Selling a planning period?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by each1teach1, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. each1teach1

    each1teach1 Cohort

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    So I just received a voice mail from the school asking me about scheduling. They want me to teach 6 classes, three regulars and three pre-APs. I'm only required to teach 5 classes per day, so they're basically asking me if I would be willing to "sell" one of my planning periods and take on an extra class for extra pay. However, they wanted to ask me first since they know I'm a brand new teacher, fresh out of the academy, and so they don't want to overwhelm me. My initial reaction was an automatic "no". Even though I wouldn't be gaining or losing a prep, I want the planning period. However, I wanted to ask you guys and see what you thought.

    Have you ever "sold" a planning period? Was the extra pay worth losing a planning period and gaining an extra class? What were some of the pros and cons (outside of the lost planning time and the extra work) ? Would you do it again or recommend it to another teacher.

    As always :thanks:
    e1t1
     
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  3. ancientcivteach

    ancientcivteach Habitué

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    I once agreed to teach a related arts class during my planning period. It was only a semester, but I decided I would never do it again. There were a couple of reasons:

    It was tiring. It was every other day, but on those days I got no break at all since we have lunch duty.
    It made planning with my team/scheduling parent conferences difficult.
    I had many interuptions during that time as people would "forget" that I had a class that day. Front office would send parents, phone would ring, etc, etc.

    It was actually an awesome class, less than 20, all GT and children I had taught before - it was an enrichment course which is why I said sure, how bad can it be? *geesh* :)
     
  4. janlee

    janlee Devotee

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    I would have to present this to my union. My contract states that I must have a planning period. If I agreed to this on my own I would be setting a precedent and it would cause a lot of problems.
     
  5. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    I sold my lunch time. I promptly quit at the end of the year. I got less than $2,000 and I gained the stress of being one of four teachers watching 400 students.
     
  6. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    Why are they asking you to do this and not a teacher who has been there for a while? Maybe the other teachers all turned it down because it's a pain in the butt? LOL I wouldn't do it!
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    At our school, it's fairly common for teachers to sell one of their preps, especially in high-demand subjects like math and Spanish. For most teachers, selling a prep still leaves at least one prep period of 85 minutes every other day.

    I haven't done it yet, but many of my colleagues have and they love it! Most of them actually request to sell a prep the next year.

    It amounts to about $500-800 per paycheck (so, $1,000-1,600 per month), which is not insignificant on a teacher's salary. Plus, it tends to lighten the teacher's load in his or her other classes....Rather than having 40 kids in each of 6 class periods, the teacher might have closer to around 33 in 7 class periods.

    From the posts I've read here, the situation at my school might be unusual. It is permitted per our contract because we are paid extra for extra duties. I guess our school day is also a lot shorter, about 8 AM until 2:15, than some of the times I've seen posted. And none of us has lunch duty--we all get a 30-minute, duty-free lunch.
     
  8. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

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    We don't even had the option to sell, but I'm not sure if I would or not. The money might be nice, but you may need a sanity break. Just pray about it.
     
  9. Pencil Monkey

    Pencil Monkey Devotee

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    since its your first year, I wouldn't do it. Simply because the first year of teaching is very hard on new teachers.
     
  10. alilisa

    alilisa Habitué

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    I wouldn't do it for being your first year. I would just stick with the "normal" schedule and see if you could handle selling a prep in future years! It might be a lot of work and you will already have a lot on your plate!!
    I am still curious as to why they offered it to you, a new teacher! HMMM...did others turn it down?
     
  11. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    I have sold my prep evey year that I have taught. I might be in a little different situation in that I teach in a private school and normally we teach 5 classes and have 2 preps. I teach 6 classes and have 1 prep but since we in-house sub, I never have to sub with only 1 planning period. I love it and would consider it especially if it is not another prep. This year to have 6 classes I had to take 3 preps.
     
  12. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

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    I have never heard of this before. If it were me, I would sell my prep because I never seem to get much done during that time anyway and I might as well get paid some extra money.
     
  13. Jem

    Jem Aficionado

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    I sold mine last year for a drama class. It would have been fine, but they gave me the worst kids and NO cirriculum. Not even a script. I quite it at semester. But if you have cirriculum, it shouldn't be a problem. The money was very, very good.
     
  14. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    It depends on a lot of things...how much money are you talking about? If it truly is about $500 a pay, I'd consider it. That's a lot of money! Another question - do you have any other planning periods? Or would you be selling all of your free time? I'd only do it, no matter what the pay, if I still had an adequate amount of planning time. And, keep in mind, although you say it won't add a new "prep," which I think means that you are already teaching another section of the same course, so you wouldn't have to plan an additional set of activities....you'd have another set of kids to mark papers for, another set of grades to compile, another set of parents to deal with, etc.

    Planning time is sooo different between high school and elementary. I teach two sessions of PreK, an AM and a PM, so I only have to plan for one class and then I can repeat it (K-5 teachers at my school don't have that luxury!). However, my one session is 9-12 and my other one is 1-3:45. My only break of the day is that 12-1 break, and that is my 25 minute "duty free" lunch AND all of my planning time. I'd LOVE to have 85 minutes of uninterrupted planning time, even every other day!!!

    Kim
     
  15. NJArt

    NJArt Comrade

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    Depends on how much they are willing to pay you. My girlfriend teaches an extra english class when it's available, but they pay her an extra 6,000, so it's totallly worth it! If they were only giving her 1 or 2k, it probably wouldn't be worth the hassel.
     
  16. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    As a first year teacher do you have a mentor? This is a question you might want to ask him/her. They know the school better and would probably give you better advice if it was worth losing a prep or not.
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    They are asking you because you are a new teacher and chances are you will do it because you want to please the admin and do everything possible to impress them/keep your job (their thinking, not mine)... They are not asking more seasoned teachers because those people aren't going to go for it...

    You have some options here:
    Say yes if you want the extra money, don't mind teaching another class and think you can do it well

    Say yes if you think you can do it well and want to "do everything possible to impress them/keep your job" (see their thinking above) especially if you think there's a chance with numbers, teachers returning from leave next year that your job might be in jeopardy

    Say "gee, I'd really love to but as a first year teacher in your district I really want to use my preps to a, b, c... Thanks for thinking of me, it really means a lot that you have such confidence in me but for this year I think it best that I pass on this opportunity"

    You could always check with your union/association rep about the admin's past practice with buying prep periods...
     
  18. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    I've never worked any where you can sell a prep. It's an interesting thought. On the other hand, this is what our district is doing this year. They have forced all high school teachers to teach an extra class (now they will be teaching 6 of 7). They will not get extra money and they already have other duties (lunch, hall, etc). The district fired 70 teachers to do this. Elementary teachers have had their day increased by 30 minutes (no extra pay) The union has filed a grievance but what usually happens is that the school board says this is what we are going to do, the union wins the grievance, the board says they don't have the money to pay the grievance, and status quo stays.
     
  19. GatorGal

    GatorGal Cohort

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    That's exactly how it sounds to me. Last year was my first year, and I would have HATED not having a prep. I wouldn't agree to do it even this year if they asked me.

    At my school, seasoned teachers love selling their prep periods because they don't need to use that time and they like the extra money. I don't even think my admin would offer something like that to a first year teacher.
     
  20. each1teach1

    each1teach1 Cohort

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    well, I went ahead and called them and told them no. There is just too much new stuff going on for me. I get the feeling planning periods will some times feel like my saving grace, lol.
     
  21. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    I think you made a good decision; better to do an outstanding job on a normal amount of classes than take on too much!
     

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