Self sensory ideas for child with autism

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Toast, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Oct 5, 2010

    Hello all. I am a general ed teacher in 3rd grade and I have a student who has been diagnosed with autism. He is pretty high functioning, but at times gets sensory overload and gets overwhelmed. Until now, there has been an assistant giving him pressure point massage sensory to calm him. I would like to move away from that and teach him ways to give himself sensory since this is a tool he can take with him and use one day when he doesn't have anyone around to do it for him.

    What are some ways my student can get sensory that he could possible do at his desk or in the confines of a general ed classroom? Any ideas would be appreciated.
     
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  3. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Oct 5, 2010

    You could have a piece of velcro attached to the bottom of his desk and he could rub his finger along that when he needs/wants to- just like say the soft side of the velcro and then he can rub his hand on that. I wish I knew where I read that, but I think I heard about it on here too- so that may help.
     
  4. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 5, 2010

    What calms him? The pressure?

    Perhaps something like a little leg or wrist weight might help?

    My OT does that with me to help with my proprioception issues. Might help with self regulating.
     
  5. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Oct 5, 2010

    some self calming strategies that he could use would be:

    arm squeezes/self hugs
    pushing his hands together
    chair push ups
    desk push ups
    wall push ups
    sqeezing a stress ball
    theraputty or silly putty

    some other tools that may help:
    theraputty or silly putty
    a fidget box with different kinds of fidgets that feel different, ex. different kinds of stress balls, a small container of play doh, a small container of floam, pipe cleaner that he can twist and bend, a wikki stick that he can twist and bend, small container of slime, mini slinky, stretchy frogs/animals, stretchy string,tangle, wacky tracks, small bean bag, etc.
    a weighted lap pad (can be made using dry corn and fabric, ask your OT.)
    a deep pressure/weighted vest (ask OT.)

    helpful sites:
    http://brimhallwebsite.com/pdfs/braingymactivities.pdf
    http://www.itari.in/categories/brainbasedlearning/BrainGym.pdf
    http://www.med.wright.edu/CHC/healthydayton/handouts/kbrun3.pdf
     
  6. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Oct 5, 2010

    Do you know more about the velcro piece under the desk- like what purpose it serves, have you read or heard anything about it?
     
  7. in_denial

    in_denial Rookie

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    Oct 5, 2010

    Maybe try chewy tubes?

    (google chewy tubes and autism)
     
  8. Kate Change

    Kate Change Companion

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    Oct 7, 2010

    I've heard about using velcro, that seems to work mainly for kids who need a "tactile break". The child can stop working for a moment when they are getting frustrated and rub the velcro on their hands. I have not found this to be effective with my kiddos, but they seem to need pressure and may not have the same sensory issues as the OPs.

    The only other thing that has worked with one of my kiddos was the ball to sit on or a small inflatable sensory pill that they sit on on top of their chair. The OT who is working with this child will most likely have access to these materials and might be able to tell you if they will be helpful.

    I love the leg and wrist weight idea! I think I may have the try that.
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Oct 7, 2010

    Another cool idea is to have him wear a backpack with books in it, sometimes kids crave the "pressure" (weight) that the books pulling down on their shoulder provides for them.

    Fairly non-stigmatizing, also, because it's just a backpack!
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Oct 8, 2010

    A weight vest might also be good for the pressure.
     
  11. Nate

    Nate Companion

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    Oct 15, 2010

    Talk to the OT. There's a fairly common exercise that's really hard to describe that your OT should be able to show you/your student.
     

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