Self-contained teachers----> Probs with unstructured time???

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by ZoomZoomZOOM, Apr 13, 2010.

  1. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 13, 2010

    How do you do your lunches? I have five kids and one aide. She accompanies them to breakfast and lunch/recess (while I have my lunch). What I'm finding though is that my kids have the most behaviors during these unstructured times. It's gotten so bad lately that yesterday one of my bigger students put my non-verbal student in a headlock over a basketball and cut off his air! The NV student started to cry and the other student was suspended for two days.

    I just don't know what to do about these kids anymore and it's getting really frustrating. Right now I have two 6th graders and 3 7th graders but they all go to 7th grade lunch together with my aide.

    How do you maintain control during these unstructured times when you're not present? Then my aide comes in and "reports" everything that went wrong while I didn't have my students and expects me to lecture/punish them for something I wasn't witness to. Meanwhile I need to teach them and get them back on track, the lectures never seem to help, and sometimes result in disruptive behaviors that result in removal from the class. :help:
     
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  3. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

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    Apr 14, 2010

    My students eat lunch in the classroom and then my assistants engage them in a social activity for the remainder of the time. Could they eat in your room? Iused to have a much younger group and during lunch I would put in a video of some sort during that time. But, the key for me was that they were in my classroom. I would eat in the lounge. I am sorry, I know this probably isn't too helpful.
     
  4. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Unfortunately, you may have to adjust your schedule to go with them to lunch and then take your break at a time when the assistant has a controlled activity going on.
     
  5. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Apr 14, 2010

    I have this problem too. It isn't just lunch. It is recess. It is specials. It's during the after school program. It's during transportation times. It is basically any time they aren't in the classroom. They aren't holy terrors or anything nor does it happen all the time but almost every single event that requires the behavior specialist or an email home comes out of these times. I can't be with them all day. I haven't figured out how to really help them cross-apply. It also happens with some subs. (I have one that it doesn't happen with).

    I do get frustrated because it really doesn't happen like that in my classroom. I can't say my students are perfect angels in the classroom but most of the behaviors in the classroom tend to be some off-task behaviors, being slow at doing a task or something like that. The behaviors that happen outside of the classroom tend to be something related to physical space, not being nice to each other, using inappropriate talk, excluding each other or even weird behavior like spitting on the floor (what?!!) during a lesson.

    I have to deal with the parents but I don't know how to help them when it something that really doesn't happen in my presence.
     
  6. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 14, 2010

    EXACTLY! It's so frustrating. The boy that was suspended returns tomorrow and today after school my aide was asking what plan I had come up with to keep he and the other kids apart! I told her that I was absolutely baffled and had no idea what to do about it. Since these things happen at recess, it may be a matter of sending him to lunch/recess at a different time. Although I'm not sure what I would do with him while everyone else is at lunch. And there goes my lunch time too, 'cause technically I would be supervising. And that's not exactly fair to me.
     
  7. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Lunch and recess are always hard! I teach self-contained in a building that has only one grade level, but we have three different shifts of lunch and recess and typically my kids are assigned to gen ed classes that are split between at least two of them. Every year is different, but this year we were just having too many difficult behavioral issues at lunch and recess. So now I have one kid that eats with her class by herself, 2 that eat at first lunch in the cafeteria with my aide, and 5 that eat in the room with me during second lunch. With a lot of training and routine it is going very successfully. Splitting them up really helped.

    This year I also had to totally scrap recess with general ed. We just could not do it safely with 125 gen ed kids out there too, and there was no meaningful interaction going on anyway. I discovered the gym was open for about 20 minutes after lunch, so I split the kids up again. The half that need an energy break go with one aide to the gym, the half that benefit from calm things go to the sensory room or do choice time activities in the classroom and that's when I go eat. The first half of the year I didn't eat lunch at all because we were trying to get routines established, but now most days I get 20 minutes or so. :) Then we do our proper outside recess at the end of the day, when no one else is on the playground. We can work on social and motor goals out there SO MUCH BETTER with fewer kids, and the added benefit is that the buses pick us up straight from the playground. That eliminated a difficult transition back into the school. With the needs of your kids in mind, I think creative scheduling helps.

    Would it help to split them up? Then you could switch off which kids you supervise every other week or so with your aide and try to troubleshoot the problems or guide her on what to do behaviorally.

    Is your recess with gen ed? Or just you guys? Could you structure it so they are doing stations or rotating somehow? Make some sort of visual chart for whose turn it is to use which equipment? Make the kids a schedule or choice chart of what to do/with whom? Or would it be better to do recess at a different time so you could both supervise it?

    I've also done OK/NOT OK individualized charts for each kid depicting which behaviors I expect and which are not OK (hitting, throwing woodchips, climbing the slide, etc.). We review them before going out to recess. If they follow the rules depicted on their charts, they earn a token for their board. They earn small prizes after 10 tokens. This has really helped some of my more aggressive kids.

    Hang in there!
     
  8. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Could you have a few of your students sit with another class during lunch? I used to eat with my students, but I sat a few seats away from them to encourage independence. I took my break during recess (20 minutes).
     
  9. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Is your kid afraid of you? (IN the good, teacher kind of way??)

    Could there be some sort of behavior checklist or check sheet to help him monitor his own behavior - and then he would review it with you when he comes back?

    My kids have had similar issues, but they're so terrified of me (in a good, structured way :)) that they know not to pull that stuff because when they get back they have to pay for it (literally, because we have a classroom economy/token system).

    This site is pretty super for behavior checklists/report cards for monitoring behaviors - and are great for kids high enough to self-monitor....

    http://www.jimwrightonline.com/php/tbrc/tbrc.php
     
  10. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Guys thanks for all the input, I really appreciate it. Beth, I think you're right. I'm going to have to split these kids up somehow. It's just a matter of figuring out how the heck to do it. It's a middle school so there are three lunch shifts; 6th, 7th, and 8th. My kids go to lunch on the 7th grade shift while I have lunch. Then they come back and we do reader's workshop while my aide has her lunch. My rough boys are 7th graders and my good kids are 6th graders. I could say that from now on, they eat with their grade level - - - but I'm not sure how we would supervise them on two shifts. Worth trying to figure out though!! Thanks for reminding me that I'm in charge of our schedule. Guess it's just time to start making some changes.
     
  11. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Oh no way. I think my kids respect me most of the time, but when my kiddo melts, it doesn't matter who it is - he'll cuss you out, throw desks, and tell you exactly where you can put your self-monitoring rubrics. This is a kid that simply does not care about getting suspended. In fact, he loves being sent home. So he's trying really hard to come up with new ways so that happens.

    And seriously sk, I used to have the mentality of "if you just love a kid enough, and teach him the right way, he'll want to learn and he'll come around." But this guy is a freakin' mold-breaker, I'm tellin' ya. He's a tough nut to crack. I even read Teaching with Love & Logic and started using those behavior strategies and language - - but the program isn't designed for chronic under-achievers.

    I'm sure it can be done, but I just don't think it can be done by me.

    Thanks anyway for the link though. I might be able to use it.
     
  12. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 14, 2010

    Hmmm... anything that is motivating to work for?

    I had a kid like that in Texas that really loved biscuits. He had to earn a certain number of checks and I'd bake him a biscuit every afternoon. Lol. Hey, whatever works.

    No behavior system, tokens, money, treasure chest, basketball time with gym teacher, trip to mcdonalds, movie tickets, anything??

    What's motivating? Nothing? (That's the hardest kind of kid to crack...)
     
  13. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 17, 2010

    He likes soda but I'm not sure it would work. What, one check per day, 5 checks = soda on Friday?
     
  14. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 17, 2010

    I'd go for daily. A certain number of checks in a day and he gets a bathroom size (small) cup of soda at the end of the day.

    I think that starting out daily, you could move to weekly if it's motivating enough. Not sure that weekly would work, especially without being able to "mess up" and still get the treat.

    When you determine the daily amount of checks, I would start out leaving some room for error. That way, if he misses a check, he doesn't have to give up (and act like a terror) for the rest of the day. Try to go "errorless" as best you can so he is successful the first few days. Then you can up the anty so to speak.
     
  15. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Apr 17, 2010

    I am with my students 24/7. I am with them for specials, recess, lunch, everything. I still have behavior problems on occasion. So, I can understand your frustration.
     
  16. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Apr 17, 2010

    Can you use a visual timer and if he keeps his hands to himself (example) for that amount of time then he gets 1 pop cap, and once he earns 5 pop caps (you can increase the amount of pop caps needed over time) he gets a super small cup of soda. A behavior card could say I am working for.... and then you could provide him with 2 choices of soda to choose from and that card could go in that spot, the under it there would be spots for five bottle caps (velcro spots) and then velcro on the bottle caps.

    Or another idea, what about a store, he can earn 1 token every 10 minutes and at the end of the day he can "buy" something with his tokens or save them up.

    Items that may be in the school store could be:

    fun size candy
    snack size bags of chips
    fruit snack packets
    fruit by the foot or fruit roll ups
    small cans of soda/cup of soda
    bouncy balls
    Mcdonalds/wendy's free coupon things
    stickers
    pokemon cards/yugio (sp??) cards/star wars cards/baseball/sports cards/bakugan cards, digimon cards etc. ( open the packs of cards to make them last longer so he only gets one card at a time.
    cool pencils
    cars
    animal bandz bracelets
    smencils
    puzzles from dollar section at target
     
  17. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 17, 2010

    Love the pop tab idea! That's a very visual and reinforcing way to approach it.
     
  18. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    I was thinking the bottle caps for 2 liter pop bottles, but the pop tab idea is a good variation to it as well :)
     
  19. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Apr 18, 2010

    Also there are soda pop candies that may work as a good motivator, gummy cola bottles, soda pop jelly belly jelly beans, fizzy soda candies
     
  20. ZoomZoomZOOM

    ZoomZoomZOOM Devotee

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    Apr 18, 2010

    Good ideas, but I'm wondering about the fairness to the other kiddos that aren't having behaviors that don't get soda at all. My kids are all cognitively high enough to say, "Hey... wait a minute..." I could also see this student rubbing it in. Any suggestions? 'Cause I think it's a good idea - love the bottle caps too!

    I do classroom store every friday already. I have a wheel that the kids spin to get money for their banks for positive behavior. At the end of the week they use their money to "buy" things from the classroom store.
     
  21. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Apr 18, 2010

    "Life isn't fair." Especially if they're high enough to get it :)

    "Mind your own business."

    I tell my kids that every day!

    You can also have some sort of "higher" privilege (such as your school store) that your other kids get - but maybe your soda student doesn't get until his behavior improves.

    Sort of like a behavior ladder. You can say, "Johnny's working to earn that, you're working to earn the store on Friday. Everyone is different."

    Then maybe if Johnny wants to earn store too, he'll get a hold of his behavior.

    Or he might like the soda and keep going for it. Lol.
     
  22. beatlebug731

    beatlebug731 Comrade

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    Apr 18, 2010

    As my professors used to always say. "Fair doesn't always mean equal."
     
  23. teacher12345

    teacher12345 Cohort

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    Apr 18, 2010

    if there is a need for each child to have an individual system you could have it so each child has a token board and instead they earn tokens to put into their bank, for example there board could have 1-3 behaviors that you want to correct (pictures of them) and then it could have spaces for 10-15 tokens and then those tokens go in their bank and they spin the wheel, if they don't get those tokens then they don't spin the wheel either?
     
  24. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Apr 18, 2010

    We always say "Everybody gets what they need." The kids understand that.
     

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