Self Contained bridge class (three grades!)

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by MissPapa, Jun 14, 2016.

  1. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jun 14, 2016

    Hello!

    So I am going to be teaching a bridge class next year. I am technically on the 4th grade, but I also have a couple of third and second graders. During my student teaching experience in a K-2 self contained class, the teacher taught the 1st grade curriculum with supports for Kindergarten (2nd grade was performing on 1st grade level). I was thinking of doing that, but again, most of my kids are 4th grade. Should I use a 3rd grade curriculum or use the 4th grade curriculum but modify to the levels of the kids? Or are there any other suggestions when teaching a self-contained class of three grades?

    First time doing self-contained on my own, so I'm a bit nervous! So best to be prepared :) Thanks!!!!
     
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  3. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Jul 16, 2016

    I've taught classes like that.
    The best thing to do is ask your principal and department head, as well as any curriculum peeps.
     
  4. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    Jul 16, 2016

    I would wait until you do beginning of the year assessments and see what grade level your students are performing on. Then go from there. :)
     
  5. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jul 27, 2016

    Thanks everyone! I'll probably ask admin or when I do baselines! I'm so used to doing one grade. I'm technically 4th grade, but they needed to place a couple of third and second graders in my class, which I don't mind! Just my first time doing this...plus two of my students won't be taking state exams and the majority will be taking 4th grade state exams, so I'm a bit here and there about it. Preparing as best as I can!
     
  6. Christopher Ellis

    Christopher Ellis New Member

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    Aug 28, 2016

    I have a similar question. I have been teaching SDC in the same district in California for more than 10 years. This year the sped dept. at the D.O. said we have to teach grade level curriculum to our students with special needs even if they're 2-3 skill levels below their grade level. In past years I taught from curriculum that was at their instructional grade level. So if a fifth grade student is assesed and working at a first grade instructional level, I would teach from the first grade curriculum at their skill level. Now I'm told that is not legal. Is this true?
    C Mee
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Aug 28, 2016

    If most of your students will be taking 4th grade exams, I'd be focusing on 4th grade curriculum. Modify for the others as needed. They will need tons of scaffolding to access the 4th grade curriculum anyway, but in the end those are the scores you will be accountable for.

    I have a much less extreme situation where I teach high school electives. I have all grades. Our big standardized test is the ACT for juniors. So, I focus on ACT prep stuff in my speech and film courses, even though not all of my students are juniors. It wont hurt the others to get a head start, or to review those skills if they are seniors.
     
  8. Christopher Ellis

    Christopher Ellis New Member

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    Sep 10, 2016

    Most of my students will be taking the CAPA. They are I'D and still struggling with CVCe words. I do have a few that will take the SBAC. The curriculum I have used in the past was at their instructional level, ZPD. The lower grade level curriculum is scaffolding.
    My other challenge is behaviors. Our DO decided to bring many students back from County ED programs and place them in our SDC. We have been told to focus on behavior first, academics second. This isn't fair to the bulk of the students who can't learn while staff is dealing with behavior students. I see a similar trend happening in the gen. Ed Classes. The DO frowns heavily on suspensions. The office has no room for these disruptive defiant students, so after 20-30 min they send them back to class. Is anyone experiencing a similar trend?
     

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