Seeking jobs in another states

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by historical_soul, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. historical_soul

    historical_soul Rookie

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    Apr 11, 2010

    Hello! First time poster but old time lurker of the forums.

    My question is how do you let employers know you are able and willing to relocate/get the proper state certification without sounding desperate in your cover letter?

    Maybe a bit of background will help? I graduated from college in May 2009 with my Instructional I certification in Social Studies (7-12) from Pennsylvania. I applied to over 60 jobs in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, and Texas. I got one interview because I had a connection to the department, but no job offers.

    So I spent this year substitute teaching in my new home of Texas (originally from NJ). Now that the job search has started again in earnest, I've pulled all stops. I'm applying to every social studies position I can find. I currently have certification in Texas and Maryland as well as my original one, but do not have the financial means to gain certification in every state I'm applying to. I think my lack of certification and my location last summer hurt some of my employment opportunities, and I'm scared it will happen again and I'll go another year without teaching full time. I'm feeling doubtful about a job in Texas because so many of the social studies positions require coaching (I did all the nerdy extracurricular in college and high school), but would be happy to go to any other state just as long as I have a job.

    So while I am somewhat desperate, I know that's a tone to avoid when job hunting.

    So how do you apply to different states without the certification and with an address that is hundreds of miles away? How do you make it clear that location isn't a concern, and getting the proper certification (or at least a provisional license for a year) can be done for a position? I realize that now there are so many applicants that employers can be picky, but I've seen so many teachers apply in other states and get hired. How do you do it successfully?

    Whew. Sorry. That was long. Thank you for reading and thank you for any consideration. :)
     
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  3. jwteacher

    jwteacher Cohort

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    Apr 11, 2010

    I've never applied in another state before so don't take what I say to heart, but you should probably not even mention it. In your cover letter, you should just focus on your strengths and what you could provide the districts in whichever state you're applying. Then if you *get* the interview, you should tell the interviewer about your plan to be certified before the start of the school year. That would show persistence on your behalf, which can only make you look favorable to administrators.
     
  4. PCdiva

    PCdiva Connoisseur

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    Apr 11, 2010

    Im thinking if you apply to state x you should write in your cover letter that you are planning to make the move to state x and will complete your certification at that time. Like write each letter as if you are planning to move there anywya not relocating for a job

    Im never done this either, just my opinion
     
  5. historical_soul

    historical_soul Rookie

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    Apr 11, 2010

    jw - My only concern about not mentioning it at all is that resumes and applications have my address and certifications, so I'm concerned if I don't say anything at all about it in my cover letter. But maybe I've just been overacting and should consider not mentioning it? I'll have to try that on some of my new ones.

    Thank you for the response!
     
  6. historical_soul

    historical_soul Rookie

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    Apr 11, 2010

    PC - That might be a good idea. I usually put in the letter that I am willing to relocate, but maybe if I just say that I will I'll have some better luck. Thanks for the response.
     
  7. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    Apr 11, 2010

    I don't usually mention it in cover letters at all and if I do I'll just mention something about how I like the area and am interested in relocating to the area. I relocated two years ago (and then moved back home) and am thinking about relocating again. This year I'm looking in home area (Upstate New York) and Maryland and was at a job fair for Maryland yesterday. Your best bet is to find places that traditionally hire candidates from other states, because they're used to dealing with out of state certifications and are more likely to not care. If you haven't yet look into rural Colorado, it seems like there are usually a lot of positions there (in comparison to how people apply). Good luck with your job search!
     
  8. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Apr 11, 2010

    I think that sounds like a good idea.
     
  9. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 11, 2010

    Most states have some sort of provisional license for teachers who have already obtained a credential elsewhere - it allows the teacher to teach while simultaneously satisfying the new state's requirements.

    That being the case, your cover letter should emphasize what YOU bring to the job. Have you got any nifty anecdotes about how your passion for history and your substituting have coincided?
     
  10. historical_soul

    historical_soul Rookie

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    Apr 11, 2010

    Jessica - Thanks for the advice! That seems like the best course of action at this point.

    TeacherGroupie - Sadly even most provisional licenses cost a decent amount of money. After subbing and working retail for a year while paying back loans, my financial means aren't the best for applying for a lot of certifications. Thank you for the advice on the cover letter though, I'll definitely think about some subbing situations that work well with my history background.
     

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