Second Year Sub...thoughts?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mckbearcat48, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. newteacher99

    newteacher99 Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2016

    I understand and thank you for your support. You are correct that I used the word slacker, which I made up:dizzy:. I agree that it is SO frustrating to be in a position where you WANT a job so badly that you can taste it. There are many in my position, because when I go on interviews even this late in August, there are many appointments before me, and many after me. It is quite disheartening.

    I apologize if I said anything out of line. I guess sometimes my frustration gets the best of me.:( I am not used to not knowing what my future holds. I know there is daily substitute jobs, but I was hoping for at least a LTS job due to school loan payments.
    :helpme::banghead:
     
  2. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Aug 19, 2016

    Trust me when I say that I have lived with someone just as frustrated and questioning "why them and not me?" Even as today was a wonderful day for my son, three rejection letters showed up in the mail, one of which I know he felt that he had a real chance of landing. I have my own issues as I would love a better, safer job, but know it will not happen. I console myself with the fact that I make a decent living where I am - they have stepped up and put money on the table for all the hard work and long nights. I finished 12 grad credits over the summer, and will be taking 6 hour this fall, while working full time. I understand that we all just keep moving, hoping to get a break, somewhere, from someone. Here in NJ, the competition is fierce. In watching my son's quest, I can tell you it wasn't much better in TX, KS, or MO.

    I sincerely do wish you all the best. I do know what living life, waiting for any chance looks like. If you can relocate, I would consider it. I understand, however, when that isn't going to happen. Be well.
     
  3. Xidous003

    Xidous003 Companion

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    Aug 19, 2016

    I live in Southern California and have never had to sub. I think subbing for a few years doesn't look bad, but I would get out of it as soon as I could. I've been on hiring committees and subbing is accepted to a degree, but you want to limit your time subbing if you can. I was credentialed to teach grades 6-12 social science (GEN ED) in 2009. The recession of 2007-2009 devastated school districts and social science jobs are hard to find even in good times!

    I applied everywhere within a few hours of me (hundreds of applications); I was willing to relocate if need be. I applied to private, charter, and public schools. My goal was to get any full-time job to stay afloat; I had no preferences.

    I got a job at a private school with pay/benefits that were 25% less than those of public school teachers. I took classes two nights a week for two years to earn my SPED certification (mild to moderate disabilities) and completed my student teaching in the summer at a year round school (so I didn't have to forfeit my job). I found out quickly that secondary social science positions rarely come open in my geographic area and were often "reserved" for coaches, favored student teachers, and/or friends/relatives of administration.

    I realized if I wanted to live in Southern California as a teacher then SPED was my foot in the door. Most districts have good transfer policies for employees who are already in the district. Once a GEN ED opening in my subject area opens up then I plan to file my paperwork. I thought of jumping to another district recently, but have decided to stay in my own district and be patient.

    In the end, many popular metropolitan areas are saturated with teachers. Simply put there are no shortage areas and too many teachers are being produced by colleges/universities. You have to find out what the market needs in your area and either adjust or go and seek a new market.

    If you really are passionate about a particular grade/subject then your best bet are rural areas or high growth areas (Las Vegas for example). If I were you...I'd cast my net wide and keep an open mind.
     
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  4. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 20, 2016

    This week got a lot better as it went on. I did learn one of the districts I was in last year will not be using outside subs for daily jobs, but they will hire LTS. I have noticed this year my "main" district sent the other AP (not my former CT) to observe me both days I was there this week.
     
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  5. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 20, 2016

    Yeah subbing sucks if you can NEVER get out of it and hired as a tenure track, full-time teacher. But it definitely can be an "in" to a District, and depending on how you comport yourself, can lead to good things. I was just visiting my friend's classroom and bumped into a teacher who is prepping for the school year. She was the ONLY teacher in the building and saw us creeping around (I think she though we were trouble causing teenagers) but we introduced ourselves, had a nice conversation, and then it ended with, "I'll be on the sub list, so if you ever need one.." ;):thumbs:

    It's all about showing them what you got and networking. I'm going to work like hell this year to do that.
    But at the end of the day, if it doesn't happen, you can a) either continue to sub, which is at least a job; b) relocate; c) find another job or d) complain and be miserable.

    :cool:
     
  6. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 20, 2016

    In true education spirit, can I do all the above? :)
     
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  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 20, 2016

    It's America. You can do whatever you want, however, at the end of the day -- are you happy? I mean if you live in a very competitive area where they want the "best" (whatever that means,) what else can you do? Most teachers in my school are either related to or are bff's with the hiring administrators or BO E members. I can't compete with that. I'm trying to make a name for myself, but I don't know if it will yield any fruits at the end, especially they maybe hire 1 or 2 new teachers a year, if that. There's been more turnover in the last few years, but who knows what will happen when I go to look for a job. But I'm also keeping my options open and eyeing Florida. :D
     
  8. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 20, 2016

    You putting "best" in quotes is pretty much a perfect representation of a lot of markets.
     
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  9. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 20, 2016

    ;) We had a lot of "great" teachers (they were crap) in HS and only were there because of tenure. Just because you have tenure and have taught in the same position for 30 years doesn't mean anything. It just means you survived a long time. We had a government teacher who also taught at the Jail and would always go on and on about how much better her inmates were, how they were more well behaved, blah blah blah, but she didn't teach us anything. She just sat there and clicked through Powerpoints while we filled in the blanks. Very engaging. :rofl::toofunny::down: Where was her accountability? If we failed, it was "our fault." But I hear ya -- turds float.
     
  10. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 20, 2016

    This conversation reminds me of my cousins time on a hiring committee...he used to joke about having a long process where they hired the teacher who finished last.
     
  11. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Aug 20, 2016

    Buck up, and expand your limited horizons!! There are plenty of jobs out there other than classroom teaching, which can be hell on earth if you have That Class! You could work at a learning center, a museum.
     
  12. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 21, 2016

    oh I know your pain oh so well. I graduated 4 years ago. I sub regularly. I've done 3 LTS positions and sub in 11 schools (elem to high) trying to meet the right person who can get me a job. All the teachers share my name, I get texts all the time - so and so said to call you, you're the best - blah blah blah. Yet no interviews. I've applied for 283 jobs with 1 interview 3 yrs ago - he called me back & offered a reading intervention position, but I had just taken one at another school. I truly think my issue is my Master's degree, but law they have to pay me more $ & they don't want to do it. If I could just get someone to tell me that's the reason then I can move on.
     
  13. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 21, 2016

    would love to know what other ideas are out there....
     
  14. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 21, 2016

    Well said! It's hard to sit and cry as I watch friends decorate their classrooms every year - I've even helped several of them. Of course I will be in their rooms later in the year as a sub. but I want to be beside them as a colleague instead. Not to mention that my loans are due & I can't pay them without a full time job.
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I suggest that you keep reading in the thread, and get to know a little more about me and the struggle that I have lived with to see my son employed. luv, many of us on this site have tried to help you with your resume, cover letter, and how to present your skills in the best light, but you have refused to share what makes you unique enough to be the one hired. If it was just me, I might understand, but many members have tried to get you to tell us how your PD and experience will make you a superior candidate, because if you can tell us, you can share that in an interview. Not one of us is "high and mighty". We are, however, experienced, and I am sorry that you are not. You have refused helping hands offered in friendship, choosing to stick by your mantra that you have no special skills that would set you apart. I have a job, but I paid my dues and earned it. I wish you had a job, I truly do, but I never said that having the feelings of dejection were bad, only letting them show, for the whole world to see. Presenting that persona of dejection and depression to potential employers can't possibly help attain the job that his heart desires. Let's call that what it is - a lot of experience. I learned that what you portray matters, so it pays to get the feelings under control for the best chance of success. If you have been job hunting for four years, I would think that you would have learned that by now as well. Best of luck for success in your hunt.
     
  16. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I am no expert in the matter, but this seems promising to me!
     
  17. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I have not refused help. I literally do not have any skills that set me apart. Noone has given me any examples of skills. I've subbed that's it - so has everyone else that didn't get hired right out of school. I guess you could say I having children would be different than many of the new grads. I've listed my PD but was told to remove it that it's not important.
    I do not present anything negative to potential employers - I've only been interviewed once. Just because we come here to vent doesn't mean that we walk in to an interview complaining about how rough life is.
     
  18. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2016

    It's not up to anyone else to give you examples of skills. That's on you. A little accountability and personal responsibility go a long way.

    You legitimately can't think of any special skills that you have? There must be something that you're good at, better than the average person. It's your job to sell yourself. If you can't or won't do that, then there's really no point in even looking for a job.
     
  19. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2016

    Perhaps it's time to go acquire some skills?

    Things that come to mind include:
    - technology skills (coding, robotics, general computer skills), bonus points for being willing to teach said skills in either an elective or after school club setting
    - sports/ athletics skills and willingness to lead after school activities in these areas
    - leadership skills, particularly in settings that have things like student government/ ASB
    - ELL and/or SPED credentials
    - ability to communicate at a basic conversational level in a second language, especially if that language is spoken by a meaningful percentage of parents/ families
     
  20. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2016

    thanks for the encouragement. Now I know I've wasted my time.
    Nope I'm not good at anything.
     
  21. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2016

    Sure I have basic computer skills but so does everyone else under 40.
    robotics & coding aren't useful in elementary schools around here
    I haven't played sports in over 20 years and the only sport in elem schools here is archery & the P.E. coaches teach them
    I took Latin & 4 years of French, but no French speaking people around here & even if there was I'm not conversational.
    I'm checking into going back to school to add ELL but that wouldn't open a huge field here, most schools it's an itinerant position, because there aren't enough students. So there aren't that many teachers in the county.
    I like crafts - but that certainly wouldn't be something to hire a teacher on.
    See, nothing to offer.
     
  22. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2016

    [​IMG]
     
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  23. phillyteacher

    phillyteacher Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2016

    Welllll... I think this is that negative attitude others have referred to.
    • NOT everybody under 40 has useful computer skills. You could become Google Apps for Education certified, for example. I'm not quite sure why you are stating that robotics and coding aren't useful in elementary schools. Because they don't already have programs? STEM is huge just about everywhere, and being willing to start a program where there isn't one would be a huge bonus for many school leaders.
    • If you have any interest in general physical fitness, you could try volunteering with a program like Girls on the Run or similar. (I am not sure your gender, but I believe you don't have to be female to volunteer.) Again just because something doesn't already exist doesn't mean it wouldn't be valuable to have and advertise the relevant skills.
    • You could LEARN another language. There are both free and paid apps and websites that help with this, such as Duolingo.
    • ELL skills may also make you more competitive for non ELL-specific jobs, as well as just making you a better teacher in general.
     
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  24. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 22, 2016

    So what did you do the entire time you were in school? Did you not have an area of interest that you learned more about, through reading a book or actually getting involved in some way? Did you not become exposed to certain curriculum programs or intervention programs during your student teaching? What have you been doing since school besides subbing? If you're only subbing, you must have plenty of time to go learn something new... as someone else mentioned, Google Apps for Education Certified, Wilson Reading Program... SOMETHING. Besides attending PD, what did you do with that knowledge? Did you seek out further PD in the same area? Did you volunteer to do anything related to education?

    If you don't believe in yourself, no one else will... Whether or not you explicitly complain about how rough life is in an interview, it will come through in your cover letter and in person. You can come to this board and complain all you want, but you shouldn't be shocked when others tell you (and the other people who mope and complain) like it is. Why not go do something to better yourself than vent and complain repeatedly on a message board? Clearly that's not getting you anywhere.
     
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  25. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2016

    your message is helpful. I have never heard of these things - if I don't know things exist it's kinda hard to become certified in it. (goggle apps, Wilson reading).
    yes I've read some books but haven't used the info yet
    I haven't done anything with the knowledge from the PDs since I haven't been in a classroom to use it.
    No I didn't get involved with any curriculum programs or intervention programs in college. I had a seminar on intervention but that's it.
     
  26. luv2teach444

    luv2teach444 Companion

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    Aug 22, 2016

    Here we have a science program implemented into most schools but you have to be a classroom teacher to be trained in it.
    I will see what I can find out about coding & robotics.
    I will check into the free language apps - I tried Rosetta Stone some but didn't learn much. I figured if I don't have a degree/certification in the language it wouldn't be beneficial. I know basic sign language, but that's not going to get me anywhere.

    thanks for the specifics. this is what I've needed - knowing what skills to go learn since I don't have any. I get that I SHOULD have something to make me stand out but I'm just stating the facts, not trying to be negative.
     
  27. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2016

    I learned the "hard" way how all of us are in this for one reason: to make students' lives better. I know I've been pretty negative, but the first week is over...good luck to you luv...hope you find that which you seek.
     
  28. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    If you truly left with no skills after graduating from a teacher's program, I would be pounding on the door of the university and asking for my money back. Guess what - you wouldn't be the first to share the blame with universities that "prepare" you for a job you can never get hired for. Honestly, I would think that by now you would be thinking what else can I do, maybe looking to acquire SPED certification, which can be done one class at a time, in grad school, usually in evening classes, since it is a cert mostly employed teachers pursue. In my most recent class, however, it was virtually all para's who were trying to become more marketable. Start coursework as a reading specialist - just the gumption of starting may be enough to turn you from ho-hum into desireable.

    The problem that people are having, luv, is that you should be able to figure some of these things out on your own. If you can't be a self starter to some degree, how will you be the leader in the classroom? If you took PD, well, we have all taken some that isn't our fave, but we learn something that we can take away with us, use in the classroom, or incorporate into our teaching strategies from even the most boring and least stimulating programs around. If anything from any of those experiences sparked even the least amount of interest, did you consider building on that, learning more, finding the big picture and seeing how it could help you be a stronger candidate? These self starter skills seem to be what you are most lacking, or at least unwilling/unable to share here. If you can't share with us, I can see where you would struggle in an interview, and I do know how frustrating that can be. I actually only see two paths. In the first, you find a way to build on an interest or existing, but weak, skill set. If you can't find one, do some research and find out what most of the employment ads are looking for in your area. SPED is usually top of the list, and middle school teachers, science and math are not far behind them. If you haven't considered changing your preferred age range, maybe you should seriously look into that and see if you can't get your transcript evaluated, the first step in adding more endorsements.

    The second path is less extra work for your own learning, but also less desireable financially - stay a sub. There is nothing wrong with subbing - I should know, I did it for a long time before earning my license, but financially it is not the best. In some states, a certified teacher gets paid much more than a regular, 60 credit sub, but I don't think that is common in all states. Good subs can work almost every day of the year, but no benefits, no stability.

    You have assumed that we don't want to help, but we have been trying all along, asking questions that should prompt you to start looking for some answers on your own. No one here has made the assumption that you can't think for yourself, hence the lack of step by step instructions. Teachers lead and inspire, luv, and mindless robots seldom succeed in education. This field is exactly where most of us want to be, and the fact that we are learners in addition to being teachers is a primary reason. We see "why?" and immediately jump to "why not?" If the square peg doesn't fit into the round hole, we think of ways to rebuild the puzzle board to make success possible. The education we receive formally is a mere fraction of the education we create for ourselves. That's not "high and mighty" talking but experience and hard work along the way. Virtually every successful teacher has at least some similar stories to tell. I can tell you that as a parent I never wanted my son to have a teacher who couldn't think outside of the box, or be creative when hitting a rough patch. I believe now, as I did then, that what the students learn from that teacher is how to throw up their hands and give up.

    I hope that you will do some research, get in touch with professors, use them as sounding boards, tell them your sad tale, and hopefully have them continue to mentor you - it does kind of go with the territory. Those are the people who know you best, so maybe they can phrase advice in a way that is easier for you to relate to.

    Best of luck, no matter what path you choose.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2016
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  29. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 23, 2016

    Agreed. I walked into the school where I am currently employed and looked around. It's a fairly new school and the lobby area is almost empty. However, there is a raised area that can function as a stage. By the time I hit the interview, I had planned a talent show and a open-mic reading night. I have no idea if I will get to do either of these, but it was my initiative that got their attention.

    mckbearcat48, I'm glad you're having a better week of it. Any chance you can volunteer to help with things in any of the schools where you are? I will bet the house most schools are short on activity chaperones.
     
  30. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Aug 24, 2016

    Well....my 2nd year lasted 6 days. I interviewed for a Social Studies position and was hired to teach science specifically because I did LT sub job at the "rich" junior high in the county!
     
  31. tigger88

    tigger88 Rookie

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    Aug 24, 2016

    Congratulations!!!
     
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  32. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    So are you happy with the job? I know you were looking for English and/or SS... I mean a job is a job, so it's a good thing to have one. Just curious how you feel about teaching science.
     
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  33. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    Congrats!!!!! I second asking how do you feel about teaching science?
     
  34. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Aug 25, 2016

    Remove thy scarlet letter and GET TO IT!
     
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  35. atobeteacher

    atobeteacher Rookie

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    Aug 27, 2016

    Congrats Mckbearcat, I've read bits and pieces on the forum about your job seeking adventures! :)
     
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