Scrolling - Math

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Beezus, Jul 30, 2009.

  1. Beezus

    Beezus Cohort

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    Jul 30, 2009

    Does anybody do scrolling with their class? Basically, this is when students fill in hundreds charts, taping them together, and rolling them around a pencil. They can do this during early finish time, etc.
    Just wondering -- for those who do it.....do you provide a blank grid for them to get started? Any preferences for size of the paper used? Any other suggestions or heads up?
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Would they use the scrolls then for math problems or is this a 'filler'? Something tells me I've seen something like this in a video, but I'm not sure of the purpose...
     
  4. Beezus

    Beezus Cohort

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    yes-- it's used as a filler
     
  5. greengables

    greengables Rookie

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    Why do they roll them around a pencil? Is it so they'll have them handy?
     
  6. BethMI

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    I do. It gives me a good idea of who gets/doesn't get number sense and relations, also patterns. I have them tape it to an empty paper towel tube and then they paperclip the loose end on the tube. They keep in their desks.
     
  7. Ms.T

    Ms.T Comrade

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    Everyday math has a grid for this. That's what I use.
     
  8. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

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    I use a grid provided by Everyday Math, but I'm sure basic hundred charts would work. We have parents send in paper towel rolls that are empty and we do a lesson on how to start it and then I keep grid paper in the room so they can grab it as needed. They learn the routine to how they work and it was a great thing for them to do when they were finished early!
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    So they keep adding hundreds charts until they get up to what number? Do you check these? :eek:
     
  10. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    My intern teacher used these in second grade, but the scrolls were not around a pencil from what I remember.
     
  11. GoldenPoppy

    GoldenPoppy Habitué

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    I am very confused.

    What I think I'm reading is that students are filling in 100s charts (like a 10x10 grid with the numbers 1-100?) over and over again and taping them together and wrapping them around a center (like a tube or pencil?).

    Or...is it writing numbers on pieces of paper and adding to the strip as the numbers get bigger, for example:
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    attach a new strip
    11
    12
    13
    14

    So when I unroll my scroll I have the numbers from 1-whatever, depending upon how many I have written?
     
  12. Beezus

    Beezus Cohort

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    They're filling in blank 100s charts. So it's (you'll have to imagine they all line up under each other -- I can't get it to post right):
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20.......

    It helps kiddos see patterns, place value, etc. I had seen it done in classrooms during my field, and the kids were always very excited about it...but I didn't see any educational value in it. Last week, I went to a math training where we were immersed in different base counting systems (like base 4 or base 5). It was a bit confusing. The instructors emphasized that our discomfort with these different base systems was much similar to the how students feel as they are learning the base 10 system.
    I noticed as I was filling in the chart, how I began to notice patterns, and place value became so much easier. The instructors actually suggested doing scrolling in early primary classrooms to support students. You can also have them shade in squares to notice patterns (like every other one for odds or evens).
    That got me thinking...if I was noticing how it was helping me understand this new base system....it certainly would help my students (1st graders as well)....plus, I remember how much the students I have seen doing this enjoyed it....so I decided I will give it a try this year.
    Thanks to everyone!
     
  13. Kangaroo22

    Kangaroo22 Virtuoso

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    In a first grade I subbed the kids loved scrolls and would actually choose to do them during indoor recess and you could definitely tell which students understood the patterns in the scroll and which didn't.
     
  14. BethMI

    BethMI Cohort

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    First sheet 1-100, then 101-200, etc. In 2nd grade our kids have to know how to count to 1000, so I usually have them go that high, but many choose to go higher.
     
  15. GoldenPoppy

    GoldenPoppy Habitué

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    Jul 31, 2009

    Okay, the terminology of what the paper is called was the problem. I think of a hundreds chart/board as the 10x10 grid, but place value strips are different. I first saw this activity at a Math Their Way workshop.

    I've done the place value patterning in 4th grade and it has been helpful in getting the students to really look at the patterns that form. Most of them know that we count 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, and regroup, but they don't have a true understanding of why. After we have explored the base 10 patterns some, I have them work with counting in base 4 or 5 and compare.
     

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