Scrapping the Clip Chart?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by soleil00, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Oct 4, 2011

    I post here way too much.... LOL

    Okay so I've had the clip chart going since school started. Lately... my kids have absolutely no regard for the meaning of it. They don't care! I move them down, it disappoints them, but they go right back to misbehaving (in my case it's talking to and touching their friends). The only thing that phases them are phone calls/notes to parents and you can imagine how I am not wanting to do that every single day for half my class.

    So, I think I may scrap my clip chart and start all over, but the problem is..... I don't know any other method of behavior management! Every single teacher in my school uses a clip chart. No one has anything different, other than the ones that just yell a lot. I don't want to be THAT teacher that has to yell to get her kids' attention, which has been my week so far and I hate it.

    I need help, badly. I love my kids, they are a sweet bunch and have absolutely no "real" behavioral problems, but they just never stop talking until I raise my voice and they know they are in "serious trouble".

    I'm just at my wits end with getting my class completely under control without yelling and that doesn't bode well for me having a great first year! :dizzy:
     
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  3. Toast

    Toast Companion

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    Oct 4, 2011

  4. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Oct 4, 2011

    I clipped SEVEN kids down today... and they turned right around and continued doing the behavior that caused them to be clipped down..

    I'll take a look at your link Toast and see if I like it enough to try to modify it! :)
     
  5. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Oct 4, 2011

    I think the "magic" in the clip chart is not the actual act of "clipping down" but the consequence that comes with it. I am a big clip chart advocate because last year, when I first implemented it, it worked wonders! I started it mid year and it really helped to turn some behaviors around. Now, it wasn't a miracle worker but it definitely was effective. Now this year, I started it first day of school and because this year is so crazy & hectic (new principal, many changes, noisy group of kids), I have not implemented every aspect of the clip chart idea. For example, I have not been consistent with adding up points on the clip chart for Fun Friday. I have been creating my own Fun Friday list, separate from the chart and I don't think that's fair. I do it without thinking. Also, I have not been remembering to clip students up more than I clip students down. The chart is not effective if I'm always clipping down, I think. The students have to see success, and feel a little success with it before it becomes effective. So I think tomorrow I will make it a point to only clip up unless I really, really have to...for at least a couple days. I need to bring the spark back into it. I think I will also stay true to the point system and add up points on Friday. One student made it to "Outstanding" since school started and that is not good. That means I am not holding up my end of the bargain. (I also forgot to give him a certificate for getting to Outstanding on the chart):blush:. So if I could give you my opinion, consider how you actually use the chart from day to day. If everyone clips down, the chart becomes a negative aspect of your behavior management plan instead of something positive.
    Good luck with whatever you decide to do.
     
  6. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    I do have some that go up, but they turn right around and do something that makes me move them back down.. they've done so since school started. I have yet to have one make it to Outstanding because every time they get close they do something that makes me have to move them down.. I can't reward their behavior, because then I end up doing what I'm doing now--yelling.

    I just.. am at a loss! We have both the clip chart and a marble jar, which they know the rewards and they know how to get there but it ends up being the same as the clip chart. They do amazing one day, but the next day they do something that has me take marbles away. The jar has been empty since last week.
     
  7. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Oct 4, 2011

    I can empathize! I do a marble jar & table points and it's like pulling teeth to find students doing the right thing in order to reward them. But, I will say that I've learned in the past that if I use those management tools to reprimand poor behavior instead of reward good behavior, then I'll be hitting a dead end. I am very guilty of this this year. My kids are good kids but LOUD! :lol: But I think that if we use it for good, more and more of the kids who misbehave will want to feel that same accomplishment and get a little bit of that positive attention. I've seen it happen. Tomorrow, my goal is to have students clip up every time I notice them doing good things. Somebody is making it to Outstanding tomorrow! This is the only way I can use the reverse psychology on them. I want our clip chart to be positive.
     
  8. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Oct 4, 2011

    I have a clip STICK! It is a yard stick with colored tape that works just like a chart, only I get to take it everywhere. Like the hallway. And specials. And lunch. And wherever else I can show you off to other people! (or shame you-Ha!) Maybe you need to change your format and spice it up a little bit? Especially if every other teacher's got a chart. Show up Monday morning with the portable version. They will love it. ;)

    Make sure you are consistent. For every person I clip down, I try to clip up someone doing the right thing. I have rewards attached to top colors, and specific consequences attached to the bottom ones. It's a pain in the ass to make 11 phone calls home the day half the class lands on red, but I did that for a week and had no problems. A few days with half my class in detention and that got really old for them. Week 2 I had everyone on board except 3 or 4 frequent fliers. Now I am just implementing strategies for those kids and behavior issues are way down. Most people land on top of the color stick, so the few on the bottom stick out like a sore thumb. Last Friday we had everybody in the top 3 colors except 1 person!

    BE CONSISTENT. Say what you mean. Mean what you say. If you say blue=no recess....No recess! A lot of inconvenience for you in the beginning will save you more inconvenience later on.
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 5, 2011

    Have you tried really praising the ones that are doing well?
     
  10. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Oct 5, 2011

    What happens when they move their clip?
     
  11. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Oct 5, 2011


    I do this every day. I try my best NOT to call attention to the negative behaviors (though I do slip..) but I always point out when someone is doing what they are supposed to be doing. I probably say something like "I like how Lisa is sitting/standing/walking quietly" at least 15 times a day, but just for that small handful. The others will... self-redirect but it never lasts.



    Lynnnn725 - The first time they move it down is more of a "verbal warning" basically just think about what they did and how to change it to go back up. The second time it's automatically no recess, no exceptions. If they move it again, then it is referral to our "behavior specialist" and a note home, from her and myself explaining why the child went to her room. So far none have gone past no recess, but I'm not sure how long that will last.
     
  12. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I see you teach 1st grade... so do I. Something really important to remember is that they are 6 years old. They are LEARNING.

    I praise ALL DAY as I see students behaving the proper way. I don't do a clip chart. I praise students when they are behaving properly and I implement consequences when they aren't. Today I had a student say something really rude in front of the entire class while we were getting settled for lunch. No reminders, no clip charts, he ate his lunch at the office.

    Re-direct as much behavior as possible, but make sure you have consequences for inappropriate behavior. Also make sure your routines are predictable and well rehearsed. Just yesterday we practiced walking from their tables to the carpet. We practiced 3 times in a row and today I really praised students when I saw them behaving the way we practiced. The student who crawled to the carpet today? He was sent back to his table and he practiced coming to the carpet properly. The students who goofed around during "Read to Someone"? They stayed in at recess and practiced the proper way to read to someone.

    Make the consequences productive, praise the ones who are doing what they are supposed to do and keep practicing and establishing those routines and procedures.

    Sorry - that turned into a longer post than I had anticipated. Hope this helps.
     
  13. soleil00

    soleil00 Comrade

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    Oct 6, 2011

    I try to remember their age, I really do, but I knew these kids when I was ST in kinder and they didn't act like this. Then again, they had "yellers" for teachers. They were always being yelled at so I don't think they are used to NOT having someone yell at them, so they tend to not listen to me until I yell.

    Today was a bit better. I did praise a lot more than usual and for about 85% of my class, it worked. They would get really loud and I'd say like "Oh thank you Kaleb for sitting quietly" and a majority of them would immediately shut up to vie for my attention.

    I think it helped. I hope I can get my "behavior" kids under control... I had a kid spit on another kid's desk today. He is missing out on our AR party tomorrow because of that plus his rude actions towards another teacher.
     
  14. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Most days I feel like a cheerleader the way I praise and try to engage my students with enthusiasm. I think I need to keep some pom poms in my classroom!!

    I'm not a yeller either. You don't have to be "scary" to effectively manage a classroom. Don't resort to yelling as much as you can. If you yell, it sets the bar that they don't have to really listen until you yell. It's a tricky habit to break!

    You said today was better! Great! Keep praising and they will all learn that that is the best way to gain attention.
     
  15. crunchytxmama

    crunchytxmama Companion

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    Oct 8, 2011

    I haven't done a clip chart, but last year I did a similar concept. The students would get tickets for good behavior and could trade them in if they misbehaved and had a bad consequence. Long story short, it didn't work.

    I scrapped that this year, and went super simple. I use the behavior management plan that is recommended on www.smartclassroommanagement.com and I absolutely love it! I don't do a ton of rewards for behavior that I expect them to have. Instead, I try to make the class fun and a place they really want to be, so when they are excluded from the fun, they realize that they need to follow the rules if they want to participate. For instance, a student broke two rules yesterday before 9:30 in the morning, so he was in time-out during a game of around the world. He did NOT like that, and really wanted to come back and be part of the class. He apologized to me (and to the classmate who he was rude to), and rejoined the class with no problems for the rest of the day.

    I do have a prize box, and when kids are super quick to follow directions, or go above and beyond, I'll tell them they can go choose a prize from the box. I also send home good notes to parents for students who are consistently trying their best, or show excellent behavior and effort.

    I looped with this group and last year every day I thought about quitting! This year I feel calm and in control.
     
  16. crunchytxmama

    crunchytxmama Companion

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    FWIW, here is how I would have handled the behavior kid with the spitting. I would have said (very quietly in front of the whole class), "Johnny, you spit on Susie's desk. Rule number four is that we treat out classmates and the teacher with respect, and you broke that rule." I would have told him to clean up the mess he made, and then immediately sent him to time out. At which point, I would probably pick a fun brain break or other fun activity to start. The child in time out would not be allowed to participate. The child would be left in time out until they raise their hand and wait for me to acknowledge them. I usually wait a while before I do. Then I go to them and they apologize for the rule they broke, tell me they would like to join the class, and I let them know whether they can or not. Sometimes if they are sitting in time out being noisy or still trying to talk to classmates, I tell them they are not ready. Usually I tell them that they may join the class, have them apologize to the other student (if necessary), and then I let them re-join us. I don't bring it up again or hang it over their head in any way, unless they break another rule at which point they are sent back to time out and get a parent letter home with an extended time out.

    This is remarkably effective, even with several students that have behavior problems. I have a student with oppositional defiant disorder, and it is amazing to see him really ready to apologize and come back to the class with his behavior completely turned around.

    The trick is that they have to LOVE your class, and want to be a part of it! :D

     
  17. ami6880

    ami6880 Companion

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    Oct 8, 2011

    maybe you could keep the concequences that go along with the clip chart but also implement some positive reinforcement for the talking such as table points. I do this sometimes towards the end of the year when my kids start to get really chatty and it creates a competition between the tables AND also allows the other children to be accountable for their peers behavior.

    tally a point on my whiteboard for each time I notice that an entire cluster of tables is showing expected behavior. I set a goal such as 5 or 10 points and that table can have some sort of set reward. My kids love gum so maybe a gum day or a trip to the treasure chest or lunch with the teacher.
     
  18. gutterballjen

    gutterballjen Comrade

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    Oct 10, 2011

    One of my favorite things to do is catch my more difficult children doing the right thing. Most of the time, all I have to do is say "Thank you, ______, for sitting correctly and quietly." It's amazing how quickly the others will follow suit.
     

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