Science for K-5?

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Unregistered, Mar 28, 2004.

  1. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Mar 28, 2004

    hello,
    I am currently teaching students with behavioral and emotional disorders. I have my students in groups for most classes because I have two assistants to help me. However, during science I am by myself and have 5 students in grades K-5 to teach, and no books. Does anyone have any ideas for units I could do that ALL the children would be able to participate in?
    Thank you,
    heather lynne
     
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Mar 28, 2004

    I work in a school for kids with autism, and our room is mixed age about 5-11 or so... but many of our kids are on similar developmental levels, so that helps... we've done things like making and floating boats (with your older kids, you can even do how much weight will it hold, etc), what do plants need to grow, heavy/light predictions, lights and shadows, stuff like that... i'm sure other people will have better ideas. :)
     
  4. HannahB2

    HannahB2 Companion

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    Mar 31, 2004

    Sprouting Seeds

    This is not a really good idea but i will post it anyway-

    This is an experiment-

    Materials

    *(# of groups) kinds of seeds
    *paper napkins/towels
    *(# of groups) zip-loc bags
    *scissors
    *water
    *tape
    *hand lens

    Procedures-

    1. Split into groups ( could be age groups anything you want to do)
    2. Start With A small amount of mixed seeds. Sort them out by color, size, shape etc... Sort them into ( how many groups of students there are)groups
    3. Cut paper towels in half( number of groups there are. ex 3 groups so cut 2 paper towels in half) Fold the towels to fit into the plastic bags. Add water to dampen towels. DO NOT add to much towels or you will drown the seeds.
    4. Put 1 group of seeds into each bag. seal bags.Label Bags Group 1, 2, 3 etc... Also Label with names of students. Tape each bag to the inside of a window.
    5. Use a hand lens (optional) to observe the seeds every school day for 10 days.

    Use This Chart to record your observation-

    Days

    Seeds 1 2 3 4 5 etc...
    Group 1
    2
    3
    etc..


    Hope I helped. this may not be the right kevel but you can modify if needed. Good luck!!
     
  5. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Apr 2, 2004

    I don't know if you have access to this but I also teach in this kind of classroom. I use the FOSS kits. Our district purchases for the school but right now we are doing plants and animals. They send all the materials you need.
     
  6. Colleen

    Colleen Guest

    Apr 27, 2004

    My son with autism, 6 years old, loves science experiments, he craves hands on activities, here are some of our favorite sites:)

    www.sci.mus.mn.us/sln/tf/nav/tfatoz.html

    marcias-lesson-links.com/ScienceInvestigations.html

    lessonplanz.com

    Hope these will help;)

    Colleen
     
  7. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Apr 29, 2004

    You could go to some of the teachers in your room, borrow books/units from them. My inclusion (including severe and profound) always enjoyed the hands on aspect of science. You can "build" series circuits using Christmas lights and batteries (cut a section with 3 or 4 lights, strip the ends, they touch one end to each end of the battery (C's work best) and poof, series circuit). If you have the time and the place, planting a butterfly garden is wonderful. They make pre-packaged kits with butterfly plants now, get a parent volunteer, or partner with high school ag class to till the soil. Scatter the seeds and your good. The kids get to tend to the garden and watch it grow. (Be careful about weeding though, most butterfly plants are "weeds".) Another fun, but messy one is making paper. You can do a search and find lots different ways of doing that. Some are much simpler than others. You can build "volcanoes with bathroom cups. Another fun activity is "grow buddies". Put about a cup of potting soil in the end of a knee high (not trouser sock) the cheap ones work well. Sprinkle grass seeds in the soil, then tie a knot an inch or so above the soil. Let the loose end of the knee high sit in water. It acts as a wick to draw water into the soil. The grass grows through the holes. You can draw a face on the front of the knee high, and the grass looks like hair. It's fun!
    Have fun!
    Christy
     
  8. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Apr 29, 2004

    Even better than the knee high is those stocking you get from the shoe store... you can probably get them to donate them, especially if you have a small class. My 2nd graders did this last spring, and their "Soil Sam" sat in a baby-food jar. They absolutely LOVED it!
     
  9. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Apr 29, 2004

    ideas

    Grow sweet potatoes in water. Grow a seed potatoe in soil in a gallon coffee can. Measure it to see how much it grows. Hatch butterflies. Study life cycle, sequencing. PAPER RACE Use 2 sheets of paper exactly alike. Crumple one piece of paper into a ball. Do not do anything to the other piece. 2. Hold one piece of paper in each hand, extend arms as high as possible. Drop them at the same time. Which paper falls faster? You know that they both weigh the same. Can you explain the difference. Even though both pieces of paper weigh the same, they are shaped differently. The crumpled piece is more compact and is, therefore, able to push through the air better. The flat paper has more surface area and the air pushes against this and slows the paper down. Engineers design airplanes and rockets with a streamlined shape so that they can slice through the air instead of pushing against it. LOOSE CHANGE Set a small cone-shaped wine glass right side up on a table. Place a dime in the glass and then a half-dollar. The dime should rest in the bottom, and the half-dollar should slightly cover the dime. Take a deep breath and blow hard onto the inside edge of the half-dollar. The dime will jump out Can you explain why? Blowing on the half-dollar tips the coin sideways, and your breath builds up underneath the dime. This increased air pressure lifts the dime from the glass. SINK OR SWIM Cut two paper dolls from newspaper. The size of the figures should be small enough to fit easily into the glasses. Now fill two drinking glasses with tap water. Place several drops of dishwashing liquid into one of the glasses and stir with a spoon. Hold a paper doll over each glass, then drop the dolls at the same time. The doll that falls into the soapy water gets wet first and sinks to the bottom before the doll in the plain water. The dishwashing liquid is acting as a wetting agent. The detergent helps to break the surface tension of the water molecules and allows them to soak into the newspaper. The water in this glass is actually "wetter" than the plain water in the other glass. ROLL OVER Fill a bowl with hot tap water and set the bowl on a firm surface. Gently place an ice cube in the water and let it come to rest. Do not touch the experiment now, just watch it closely. The ice cube will turn over. Soon it will turn over again. As the ice cube floats in the warm water, the bottom side melts quickly. This makes the top half heavier, so the top falls and the cube flips over. Now the warm water melts the new bottom, and the process repeats while the cube gets smaller and smaller. FOOL MOTHER NATURE In the fall months, forsythia branches form buds that contain flowers. These buds lie dormant all winter long. With the spring's warmth and moisture, the buds grow and develope into beautiful flowers. You speed up this process by bringing the branches in from the cold. The water in the vase and the warmth and light of the room fool the forsythia branches into thinking it is spring. WATCH FRUIT FLYIES. Put bananna peeling in a large glass jar. When you see a little fruit fly, put the lid on the jar and watch how fast they multiply. `STRIPES Fill a glass with one or two inches of wate, then add several drops of red food coloring, add blue to some students glasses, add enough food coloring to make a deep color. Break off an inch from the bottom of the celery so you have a fresh edge on the stalk. Place the stalk, with the fresh edge down, into the glass of colored waster. Set the experiment in a warm place for at least an hour. When you come back, you will see that the celery's stalk and leaves have stripes of color running through them. All plants have cells that are full of water. The water reaches the cells by traveling from the roots of a plant into the leaves through a series of tubes. The colored solution in this experiment made these pathways visible to you. If you cut off another section from the bottom of the stalk, you will be able to see the ends of these tubes---row of small colored dots. Petunia
     
  10. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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  11. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Apr 30, 2004

    I too am a teacher of Behavior and Emotional disorders. I know your frustrations with the lack of materials and the lack of ability to do a single project because students are in different grade levels, different grades and have different behaviors.
    If you would like to chat about some new things to do please feel free to contact me
    devmomma@hotmail.com
    Natalie
     

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