School-Wide Behavior Systems - Your Experiences

Discussion in 'General Education' started by SpecSub, Jul 9, 2010.

  1. SpecSub

    SpecSub Comrade

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    Jul 9, 2010

    Hi, everyone. I am doing a paper for my graduate class on school-wide behavior plans. I would love to get some of your expert opinions. :)

    1. If you have such a system, do you feel it's beneficial to your school? Why/ why not?

    2. Was getting the system implemented difficult? Was there resistance from other staff members or other barriers, and how did you overcome them?

    3. What would you change about the system?

    And any other info you would like to contribute would be greatly appreciated!

    Thank you!!
     
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  3. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Jul 9, 2010

    I just recently saw two posts on here about PBIS being implemented school wide by two different posters and both said it was not nearly as successful as they had hoped. I do not know what thread it was on or who it was! Drats! Sorry! This is a great research topic, I would love to hear some of your findings! Good luck!
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jul 9, 2010

    We apprently just love implementing then dropping behavior systems before they even really get off the ground. :rolleyes:

    1. If you have such a system, do you feel it's beneficial to your school? Why/ why not? I do think having a behavior system especially at the middle school level is important being that students typically travel so much. If each teacher students see in a day had a system completely independent from the rest students would have difficulty keeping them organized in their mind. A schoolwide behavior plan or system doesn't, or at least shouldn't, take authority away from teachers, just as it shouldn't completely remove a teacher's right to have his or her own procedures and other expectations specific to his or her class.

    2. Was getting the system implemented difficult? Was there resistance from other staff members or other barriers, and how did you overcome them? Yes, I've found that there will always be resistance to change, beyond just asking questions and wanting what is best for the school as a whole. We don't necessarily overcome them...

    3. What would you change about the system? It would hold students to higher standards of behavior.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Jul 9, 2010

    It's beneficial in that everyone is on the same page. Our kids see 6 different teachers a day, and about 10 during the course of the school year. When there are common expectations, then it's easier to manage.

    We've had a common system for so long that I don't remember. I'm sure there was resistance because there is for everything. There are always some holdouts. I would assume that peer pressure and administrative pressure played roles.

    We have very little turnover in our staff, and when we do have new people we tend to forget that they haven't been with us forever. We often fail to prepare people to use the system we have in place.

    I recomment making sure that everyone has input into the system. It's easier to get buy in when people have input.
     
  6. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jul 10, 2010

    1. I think it's the only way to go. Kids understand the expectations no matter where they are in school, and teachers don't have to give arbitrary consequences. I'm also confident that my admin will back me up when I need them because we're all coming from the same plan.

    2. No. Everyone was hired under the agreement that the plan will be followed. But I am going to a turnaround school where the staff is mostly new anyway. I imagine there would be objections if this were randomly implemented somewhere.

    3. Nothing so far. I know what consequences fit what infractions, and my students have plenty of chances to choose good behavior before they're sent to the office. We just go down the line....if you don't follow directions this happens, and then you have a choice to fix yourself. If you choose not to, this happens and then you have another choice to fix yourself.....and so on. It's very clear.
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Jul 10, 2010

    I'll respond for each of the systems I've been involved with.

    System One: Elementary School, token economy
    1. If you have such a system, do you feel it's beneficial to your school? Why/ why not?
    Somewhat. Students didn't really understand what it was all about, and the expectations were very vague.

    2. Was getting the system implemented difficult? Was there resistance from other staff members or other barriers, and how did you overcome them?
    There was some corruption with the implementation. Some teachers would give students not even in their class extra tokens so they'd have enough to but the most coveted prize.

    3. What would you change about the system?
    Specific expectations for the whole school, better explanation to all staff so teachers wouldn't abuse the system.


    System Two: Elementary School, "Fun Friday" reward
    1. Very beneficial! The expectations were clear, students knew that to get the extra recess they had to have all As in behavior for the week.

    2. Staff members loved it! The only problem came with rainy days. They'd just bring a treat to the room instead of letting the kids leave for a party.

    3. I'd develop a better rainy day plan.


    System Three: High School
    1. I'm not really sure what the rewards are. I know the expectations, but they aren't really tied into any meaningful reward for all students who meet them.

    2. Staff members love the expectations and include them in lessons.

    3. I'd develop a reward system. It's harder with high school. Each teacher does their own thing, really.
     
  8. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Jul 10, 2010

    Both public schools I've been in recently use a version of PBIS for behavior. The biggest difference I've seen is in the type/ frequency of the rewards.

    School 1:
    PreK-5, although I was the PreK and didn't give out the paws (mascot was cougars... it's just a 1/8 of a sheet, photocopied with a picture of a paw on it and space to let kids write thier names). Although there were occasional all-school prizes like movie or whatever, the rest of the rewards seemed more classroom-based... trip to the treasure chest, help a teacher, lunch with principal or teacher, etc. Helping out in my room for 30minutes was the most coveted item for many of the 4th/5th class across the hall from me. It typically cost them 10 paws and often was achieved every week or so. I did have kids who tried to abuse it as a way of getting out of THEIR class instead of helping out MY class... they weren't allowed back. If it took kids a week to earn 10 paws, I'm not sure they were given out as frequently as the program probably recommends. I came in mid-year, though, so I'm not sure how it was initially billed... I think it's been used for several years.

    School 2... actually, this should be district 2, as all 3 elementaries use the same sytem, and it's modified for the jr high.
    Use PBIS, except we don't use the I the way it's intended, apparently, so we call it PBS with the district number.

    We're PreK-6, although PreK doesn't really participate in the big ticket items... our kids are thrilled to be GIVEN tickets, but just take them home. :) We use tickets (the 2-part raffle ones)... they keep one side for the school-wide rewards, the other side they use for whatever classroom incentives/ raffles/ drawing/ prizes the teacher chooses. Every month is a big-ticket, school-wide incentive... extra recess, open gym, craft project, movie, etc. the kids save their tickets for. A couple itmes during the year, they also do a raffle that kids can enter tickets in order to win specific items (build-a-bear gift card, movie passes, t-shirts, etc). The favorite big-ticket event is the staff vs. student ame days... the set up a relay race in the gym (ride tricycle, hula hoop, basketball shoot, etc), and kids enter tickets to have a chance to compete against a team of teachers. All kids get to watch, but they're spending tickets on a chance to compete. All the other events have an "entry fee." At the end of the year, the BIG event for K-3 is a dance with a DJ in the gytm, and the 4-6 grade is a minor league baseball game. It costs a fair amount of tickets, but we're all pretty conscious about giving them out when warrented, and there are very few kids that it seems don't earn the rewards.

    On the flip side, they also give Discipline Action Forms (DAFs) when warrented... a lot of the K kids really don't seem to understand that they don't WANT to receive them, but I think that comes with maturity. 3 DAFs earns you a lunch detention, regardless of the amount of time it took you to get those 3. (You can also get lunch detention before 3 DAFs if behavior warrents it) Any kid who earned 3 DAFs after spring break didn't get to do field day. We seemed to spend a lot of time this year reviewing with the teachers what does and doesn't warrent a DAF because there was some inconsistency... but unless they actually tracked the grade levels, individual students, and infractions, that probably wouldn't have been noticed.

    In addition, my school (and as far as I know, we're the only school in the district that does it) also gives CLASSROOM tickets. If the entire class has exceptionally good behavior (no behavior reports from a sub, finally turning in all homework, walking silently in the hall, excellent lunchroom behavior, fire drills, etc), any adult in the building can give them a CLASS ticket. These are placed in a jar in the office, and on Friday, 10 are chosen to receive "Star Classroom" awards... this is literally just a small die-cut star (our "mascot") they hang outside their classroom and see how many they can collect by the end of the year. It is such a tiny thing but it's a HUGE deal to win one.

    School-wide behavior expectations are posted in every classroom, hallways, etc... practiced throughout the year, and often targeted in a ticket blitz... plus a "cool tool of the week" which teachers get reminded of DAILY in our email. :) I think having a single set of behavior expectations from the time they enter our school until they leave does make a difference, because they honestly can't say nobody told them. They're EVERYWHERE. :)

    At the jr high, they are in houses (think Harry potter-esque) and instead of earning tickets, they earn points... they can also lose points, apparently... and the House with the most points at the end of the year earns the traveling trophy. I'm not sure how the points and tickets and DAFs are handelled at that level.
     
  9. Aussiegirl

    Aussiegirl Habitué

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    Jul 10, 2010

    We have one in our middle school, there is a degree of resistance (another thing to keep track of), it does little for the 8th graders. A great number of them don't even hand in their behavior chart at the end of the marking period in order to earn the prize activity.

    At the school where I student taught, they also had one, but dropped it for 8th grade due to lack of participation by students.
     
  10. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Jul 10, 2010

    We use it and it is not working. It is nothing to do with PBIS and EVERYTHING to do with the fact that a good number of teachers will not get on board. If every teacher doesn't buy into the program it diminishes the power of the program and leads it to fail. And then of course those teachers that didn't buy in can say they knew it wasn't going to work and that's why they didn't do it.
     

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