School supplies -- YIKES

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by bandnerdtx, Aug 5, 2007.

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  1. moonbeamsinajar

    moonbeamsinajar Habitué

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    Aug 6, 2007

    My daughter is in honors math classes. Not only did she have to buy that expensive calculator, but she also needed an expensive graphing calculator for honors physics. Luckily, her older sister had an old graphing one, so we only needed to buy one.:p
     
  2. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Everything that is on my list are things that the kids will use. I have them bring vis-a-vie pens (1) and they use it during center time. I also have them bring in dry erase markers but they will also use those during math and center time. Here is my class list:

    Items not labled with child's name:
    * crayons, 2 boxes of 24
    *Tissue, 2 large boxes
    * large pink eraser, 1
    * pencils, 24 plain yellow (#2)
    * zipper bags, gallon (boys) & quart (girls)
    * 2 packages 5 tab dividers $1.74 at Walmart)
    (Your child will be getting a BEARS binder for these. More to come later.)
    * 6 glue sticks (NO LARGE GLUE BOTTLES)
    * 2 packages paper (wide ruled)
    * 1 vis-à-vis pen (any color)
    * 1 package 3x5 index cards


    Items labled with your child’s name:

    *$5.00 for Weekly Reader
    *Scissors (Fiskar w/point)
    *ruler (to be kept in pouch in BEARS book)
    *backpack


    I also think that the parents should provide only the things the students use. Being a teacher, I know that there are a lot of things that we use and I know how quickly (and wastefully) students can use those things such as paper to draw on instead of write; glue sticks with the caps left off; erasers that are cut up; pencils with the erasers bitten off or chewed on, etc. Those things are wasteful and frankly, I shouldn't have to pay for it.

    Speaking as a parent, I buy everything that is on the supply list. I even buy extra. For example, on my son's list, she had 2-4 black dry erase markers. I bought 4 so she would have extra. I know what it's like to not have enough.

    I think that some of you hit the nail on the head when you said that a lot of these parents have enough money to buy their kids designer clothes, ipods, mp3 players, X-boxes and games, eating fast food...they have enough to buy school supplies. They know it's coming...like paperheart said, save up for it.

    However, that being said, we cannot deny the kids their education and therefore, supply those items with which they didn't bring. I don't say anything but usually, parents bring in everything that is on my list. It's not a big list and I don't think it's unreasonable. The parents may not actually see them using everything but, they do.
     
  3. tutor1982

    tutor1982 Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2007

    now I just think it is ridiculus to expect teachers to keep kids in pencils and paper! If a parent can't find $10 a year in their budgets, then something's just not adding up!

    The most ridiculus thing I've seen so far is buying your child's own workbook! Now the school certainly should pay for that!
     
  4. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    For the record, I have never minded the school supply list including consumables (used by the students). Not then (when I didn't have a clue what teachers actually go through) and not now. I have a problem with things like $97 calculators because your child was smart enough to be bumped up in an honor's math class or stuff for the teacher. Nowadays if the item is fairly cheap and reasonable, I don't quabble like I did then. As an Aide here is what I witnessed....

    For two years we've used those sanitizer wipes. We ran out last year in spite of several notes to the parents requesting more. A 5 year teacher suddenly learns that EGAD...the janitor's building actually supplies spray stuff! Granted it isn't as easy and convenient to use, but we were supplied. When the teacher got around to proofing the new school supply list she asked me what I thought and what I would add. She didn't mind adding stuff to the list but when I tried to take stuff off the list I was met with resistence. My arguement was that we already have 3 times the class size of that nonconsumable item. She insisted that we give them back at the end of the year. I told her that I'm sure we try, but if that was strictly true, why did we have so many? She wasn't asking for my help after that. What's amazing is one of things I admire about this teacher is how frugal she is with what she has. She doesn't create some fancy lesson plans and then go out and buy a bunch of items she will use once (which by the way, I'm guilty of doing because it is too much fun). She is great about seeing uses for other things and working with what the building supplies her. Now don't get me wrong, she does buy out of pocket, she's just smarter about it than most I've seen. But she went a little nuts over this prized school supply list.

    As far as kleenex, I never minded supplying that either. I don't like it, however, when someone puts a brand name on products unless there is a good reason for it. If it's just because they like that brand of sissors better, tough. What I don't like about my son's middle school list is that it doesn't seem cohesive. It has a general list and then a supply list for every class. Do they really expect a child to be able to carry around that many 3 ring binders and still need pocket folders? Wow! I bought them but I wonder if they will be used right.

    On another note...During my first year working I bought quite a few things because simply because I was using the teachers things and between two rooms and two teachers I couldn't keep up and I was losing stuff. I'm talking about sharpies, a hole puncher, etc. So I was restocking to make myself feel better. Then I found out my second year that EGAD...the school supplies that stuff.

    This post probably won't make any clear concise points I wanted to make because once I got started rambling, well it was just too hard to stop.

    My only real point to everything is that parents do need to furnish consumables and many don't mind. What throws parents off is seeing stuff they don't understand why the school isn't purchasing themselves. That first year I was paying almost $500/mo in taxes to a relatively cheap house and I couldn't believe my tax dollars weren't being used to supply teachers with the tools they need (nonconsumable items). If the list is reasonable and rather obvious, it doesn't bother me. It is my child.
     
  5. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    Aug 6, 2007

    I don't plan on sending a list home to my middle school parents. See I spent about $150 at all the 1,5,10 cent sales to get what I needed (well 12 for crayons). I have enough consumables, such as pencils, erasers, crayons for the year. I also got a class set of scissors marked with my name, some glue sticks (I didn't order enough from budget), pencil boxes to make my life better, pencil sharpeners, etc, spiral notebooks for ISNs, folders and binders for student organization, to make my life better, dry erase markers, to make my life better.


    Getting the point, if it will make my job easier, reduce my stress, give me a way to ensure my students are organized and I am not wasting 15 mins on the daily I ain't got a pencil nightmare.....well that would be the best $150 I ever spent.

    As for supplies for my kids, I have had stupid requests before, which I just don't buy, if asked by the teacher I say....give me a good reason you actually need this. If they cannot answer, well, they don't get it. I am lucky though, my kids have always gone to districts with a lot of money (we have a PE class at high schoo, sailing.....yeah that kind of school) We have been blessed, even when we were in the miliary it worked out that way....

    I can see a scientic calcualtor, but a $97 one? What does it do, type in the numbers itself??????????
     
  6. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    Aug 6, 2007

    To the person who needs to buy the $97 calculator: If it makes you feel better you can get a lot of your money back afterwards by selling it on eBay. I had to buy one in High School (was $115). I sold it after college (so about 5-6 years later) for $65 on eBay. It is a big expense, but some college math classes will require it anyways so just be sure she etches her name in it and doesn't let anyone steal it!!
     
  7. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 6, 2007

    I do a thing each year where I provide backpacks (full of supplies) to poverty-level kids. The difference in what schools require is astounding. I've spent up to $85 for a first grader! This year, I got two kids from a very upper-middle-class school (probably the only poverty level kids there) and, surprisingly, the teachers asked for minimal supplies per child. For both kids together, including backpacks, I only spent about $45.

    Kim
     
  8. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 6, 2007

    "I have four kids, all in school and it can add up. I was a little shocked at our list this year..."6" spiral bound notebooks!"

    Last week, Target had a pack of 10 spiral notebooks on sale for $1!
    I will only buy school supplies on sale...really cheap. Like 4 comp. notebooks for $1 or pencils 5 cents a pack. Then I buy a LOT of them and save them for when needed.
    Kim
     
  9. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    "As a middle class household on one teacher salary and a husband in college classes as well, I would find it perfectly reasonable to spend $50-$60 for school supplies per child. I mean, c'mon! Most families spend $50/month on fast food, movies, dinners out (not me, but that is about the national average). Which is more important--fast food dinners or financing a child's otherwise free education?? Families have all year to save for the expense."

    Around here, dinner out at a "family dining restaurant" like Chili's costs nearly that amount for our family of 5. And I run into our poverty level families out to eat ALL the time....

    Kim
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Honestly, for me it really never had anything to do with the money. I didn't mind spending money on consumable school supplies ever. As a parent though, I didn't have a clear idea of how schools work and dish out money (or the lack of it). I felt I was being asked to provide things that I shouldn't have to provide. On some things, that is still my take. On most things I now know better. In any of my comments, I have never mentioned money or worrying about it (even when I was poor) except for mentioning tax dollars. Is my child's education free? No it isn't. It never was. Between the supplies, the lunch money and the tax money it never was free. Do I mind? Not really. I don't mind paying a reasonable amount for my child's education. It certainly beats what we pay for childcare. As a parent, I sometimes resent the fact that schools don't seem to spend some of that money giving the teachers basic supplies. When we work for an office, we are furnished basic supplies. As an educator, I know to give what I can because they truly do spend more money than anybody should have to mostly out of their hearts. I don't mind supporting teachers. As a parent though, I deplore schools for putting parents and teachers in this position to begin with (not talking about consummable supplies).

    As far as money goes. I've never tallied it up. EVER. So I have no idea how cheap or expensive my lists have been. It was, for me, never truly about that. Do I look down on teachers for making such requests. Not now, though I do think they need to be prudent and aware of how parents feel as well and be smart in what they ask for.
     
  11. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Aug 6, 2007

    We had to buy one of these scientific calculators for our son when he was in high school. He needed it for his calculus classes - especially the Advanced Placement Calc class. He still uses it in college.
     
  12. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    Aug 6, 2007

    We were considered "low-income" when I was in school, but my mom had no problem purchasing my graphing calculator (which was about $100). I used it in my Geometry class, my Precalculus class, and my Physics class in high school, then again in one of my college math classes. There are many systems that require parents to purchase these.

    Here is our 4th grade list:

    FOURTH GRADE:
    $4.75 check for Weekly Reader and $3.50 for Assignment Notebook (both checks made payable to XXXX Elementary School), 1 box of 24 crayons, 1 bottle Elmer's Glue, 1 pair school scissors, 2 packages wide-ruled loose-leaf notebook paper, 1 12" clear plastic ruler (cm/in.), 1 set of fine point markers, 1 set of wide point markers, 1 box of colored pencils, 1 black and white composition book, 2 red ballpoint pens, 2 yellow highlighters, 1 plastic pencil pouch, 5 folders with pockets, 2 boxes of tissues, 1 roll of paper towels, 1 paint shirt, 1 box of Ziploc gallon-size bags, 2 boxes of #2 pencils.

    I am mad that I didn't push to get the paper towels and ziploc bags taken off the list this year. I have TONS in my cupboard. I usually have a few parents who ask about supplies at our Meet the Teachers time, and my request is that if they can get nothing else...please get a box of Kleenex, the pencils, folders, notebooks, and paper. Also, the only items that are used for the whole class are the Kleenex, Ziploc bags, and some of the loose leaf paper (if needed). Many teachers I know just collect everything from the students and then they have community supplies. I just don't like doing that, my students get to write their names on everything and the items we don't need right away are put away until they are needed.
     
  13. lteach2

    lteach2 Cohort

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    Aug 6, 2007

    Here's our grade level supply list and we are a low income school:
    Pencils (3 packs of 20)
    Loose leaf paper
    Single subject notebooks (5 spiral)
    Crayons (1 box 16 count)
    Glue sticks (3)
    Colored pencils
    Pocket folders (5 - no prongs)
    Kleenex (2 large boxes)
    Baby wipes
    Ziplock bags
    Marble notebook (1)
    1 inch binder (1)


    If you took advantage of all the sales that have been going on lately and go to the dollar store, you could get all this stuff for $6-$7.
     
  14. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Aug 6, 2007


    I don't know how many of you know this, but Wal-Mart matches competitor's prices. If I find a sale at Office Depot and don't feel like driving across town, I put it on my weekly Wal-Mart "grocery" list. I do this with grocery store ads as well. I save tons of money (and gas) this way!

    Regarding the $97 calculator. I'm actually looking at it (TI-83 plus) right now! My daughter did not go to college (at least not yet -- keeping fingers crossed), but when I enrolled in college math courses, I took over the ownership of the calculator, and the only thing I had to buy to go with it was the cord that will allow it to download/upload to the computer! I figure that since both of us got lots of use from it (I still use it at home), we've gotten our money's worth, lol.

    Someone mentioned being shocked by having to purchase a student's workbook. As far back as I can remember (even when I was in elementary/middle/high school), we have ALWAYS had to pay a "workbook" or "lab" fee each year. Once I hit high school, depending on the courses I was taking, it could be multiple fees (biology, French, chemistry, whatever).
     
  15. Tbelle1035

    Tbelle1035 Cohort

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    Aug 6, 2007

    I just ask for the usual stuff, 2 sets of markers, a pencil box, crayons, scissors, a clipboard and 1/2" binder for each child's personal use.

    Anything that is to be used for the class in general may be sent in as a donation. Kleenex, ziploc bags, hand wipes, Clorox wipes, etc. I ask those who can to send in one or two items. As the year progresses, if I run short of something, I send home a notice in the Donations section of my weekly newsletter. There are always those parents who continuously ask me, "What do you need?" and jump at the chance to donate. This way, those who want to can, those who cannot do not feel pressured and I seldom end up disappointed!
     
  16. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Aug 6, 2007

    I ask for very little from the parents:
    a backpack and lunchbox
    a comp notebook (about $1, if not on sale)
    2 pocket folders (can be found for as little as a penny)
    2 glue sticks (again, about $1)
    a 4 oz bottle of glue (I just bought them on sale for 20 cents)
    hand sanitizer (anywhere from $1-$3)

    Then, at the bottom of the supply list, I list a whole bunch of things I use on a regular basis and ask each family to choose 2. So far, it's worked out that I get a fairly even distribution of things, and I always include some more expensive items and some cheaper ones. I also encourage parents to take advantage of the dollar store! There things are for general class use, and I specify that, but they're not for MY use, so I don't mind them pitching in. If I run short of something throughout the year, I put out a note asking for it. Here are some of the things on my general use:
    plastic silverware
    plain white paper plates (small or large size)
    baby wipes
    pump bottle of hand soap
    4-pack of playdough (brand-specific)
    roll of paper towels
    package of ziplock-style baggies, any size
    box of tissues
    package of safety pins
    10-pack of washable markers (Crayola brand only)

    I figure the parents who want to spend a lot will buy the most expensive items (or purchase more than the requested two things) and those that can't or don't want to can hit the dollar store for soap and plastic silverware!!
    Kim
     
  17. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    I think the sad fact is this...many schools don't have the money to provide a lot of things that teachers and students need. I am so fortunate to teach in a school that has resources and supplies. As a first year teacher in NC, I was making $23,000. I walked into a trailer with NOTHING but some old textbooks and desks. I was able to get a stapler and a few pens...but that was all that was provided for me. The students had been asked for almost nothing (it was middle school) and even after I sent home notes stating that the students needed 2 notebooks or a binder with loose-leaf paper and pencils...I was still providing about half of my students with these items on a daily basis. I worked for about 6 weeks before getting my first paycheck, and in that time, I spent almost my whole first check on supplies and resources and things to make our awful paneled classroom bright and inviting. Our school was NOT low-income for the most part. I had a friend who was raising 2 sons solely on that beginning teacher's salary....she had to go into debt her first year because of everything we were asked to provide for the kids.
     
  18. Penzey

    Penzey New Member

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    Aug 6, 2007

    Ticonderogas are the best pencils


    I agree with everyone about not putting the weird or expensive things on the lists, but Dixon Ticonderoga pencils are absolutely the best! When students buy those cheapo pencils, they end up grinding them down in the pencil sharpeners because they won't sharpen. When they try to erase, they just smear black marks on the paper. I only buy Ticonderoga - especially for standardized testing. They are not that much more expensive and they are worth it.
     
  19. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    That's exactly what pisses me off. People pay very high real estate taxes and EXPECT the classroom to be adequately provided for. I'm not talking low income here either. Teachers don't necessarily need every wishful request they ask for (and some get) but they need BASICS. It shouldn't have to be begged from parents and it shouldn't have to come out of teacher's paychecks. Some teachers are more frugal than others but if there isn't even a BASIC list of tools of the trade, it is a disservice. You don't walk into ANY office, even struggling nonprofits without having basics. I'm not saying I don't know it is done everyday. I'm saying it seriously pisses me off.

    I worked for a nonprofit for a short while. They taught me to recycle paper and be frugal in a number of ways. They even taught me that if I wanted to participate in a parade, I didn't need as many materials as I thought I did. They taught me that creativity is great and valued. Having said that, they STILL provided me with basics!!

    I discovered the love of Ticonderoga pencils last year. As an AIDE I bought some for my students. It didn't end up being worth it because they went through those like water too. For my own house though I now only buy those. Having said that, prior to last year when I made my own personal discovery, I doubt I would have bought anything more than #2 pencils because I wouldn't have understood. I didn't buy them for my kids because I know they will be mixed up with those cheap pencils and he won't get to use them. I didn't send the cheap pencils from staples penny sale either. For me, I look at the erasers. I know how to pick out good pink erasers too now. My teacher laughed at me last year because she picked up an eraser and I said, :down: . She picked up another one and I said, :down: :down: . She cracked up and said which one then. We had this huge dialogue of why I picked up the one I did. :lol: (She was getting an eraser for a student who has horrible handwriting and most of the time didn't erase well before he wrote over it.)
     
  20. USMCTCHR

    USMCTCHR Companion

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    I honestly didn't know that! :woot: That is great for me as a busy mom. I know other places are cheaper, but honestly with all of the activities that a new school year brings I do try to hit Wal-mart as my "one-stop shop".

    It's not worth it to me to drive to five different stores, get four kids out of the car and into the store and through another check-out line for one or two items. So, I really appreciate the heads up on Wal-mart!

    I do NOT mind buying supplies, and as I stated, I even send in extra. But it does frustrate me that I am sending them in quite often to supply other children. I wouldn't even mind if it were the low income families...but usually it's not!
     
  21. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    You know, I was *seriously* disappointed in Wal Mart's choice of rulers. My store didn't have any plan wooden or plastic rulers available. All they had were these really fancy plastic/gel inside things and ones made of metal. I know the dollar store sales 4 wooden ones for a dollar. I directed a few parents in that direction. I know those break so easily, but boys are going to attack each other with rulers regardless of what they are made of...:D

    I also didn't know Wal Mart matched prices. Is that a store by store decision, or is that corporate policy?
     
  22. willsgirl

    willsgirl Comrade

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    It's my understanding that it's store-wide, and maybe even Sam's does it, too, I don't know. But, it has to be the exact same item: brand, size, type, etc. And, I'm sure that it's per location, i.e., if my local grocery sells Cokes for $2.99/twelve pack, then my Wal-Mart will match but probably not yours.
     
  23. uclalum

    uclalum Groupie

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    My mom had to buy one of these for me too (when I was in high school) and boy was she mad!!! I still have it. I should sell it on ebay!
     
  24. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Well said:thanks:
    Come on people...
    Items asked for are needed or they wouldn't be asked for.
    Parents may struggle buying items, but am I supposed to do supply for their kids? I have three children of my own on a teacher salary. Comments in this thread sadden me :sorry:
    One point addtional point...when kids supply their own, they take better care of it especially if they know their parents will have a hard time replacing it.
     
  25. LvMyFourthGrade

    LvMyFourthGrade Rookie

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    School Supply Drive

    Where I live we have a radio station and several businesses that have a school supply drive for the needy families in our area. This really helps out a lot for the kiddos that would otherwise not have supplies!

    School supplies are really expensive. I have two kids myself and just spent $150.00 the other day. They are MY kids and they are receiving a FREE education so the least I can do is provide MY children and their teachers (that work their tails off in their rooms) some help.

    Due to the unfunded No Child Left Behind laws there is little money left in schools to help with supplies. If we have the money as parents to help out I see it as the noble thing to do.

    As a teacher myself I can't afford to purchase everything I need for my kiddos in my room. So what I do when I make my supply list is mark the extras as optional that way parents don't feel obligated to buy them and the parents that have the money usually don't mind to purchase materials for their children's FREE education.
     
  26. 4myclass

    4myclass Cohort

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    I agree! I have four children of my own to supply and I shouldn't have to supply 25+ more students. Last year when I taught Pre-K, I used all the weird stuff on my list and more. I spent over $1000 on stuff for my classroom because the parents didn't send it and the school wouldn't supply it. In Pre-k, we use a lot of baby wipes, paper towels, paper plates, brown and white paper sacks, shaving cream, dry erase markers, tissue paper, kleenex, zip-loc bags, dixie cups, etc., not to mention the usual crayons, scissors, pencils and markers.
    In Oklahoma, education is very poorly funded. Teacher pay is ranked near the bottom. I think that it is wrong for people to accept the idea of teachers supplying student supplies.
    Teachers should review their lists yearly and make changes as needed. If you don't need 100 pencils, change it to 30.
    Parents need to be aware of the fact that teachers are only given a minimal amount to supply their rooms and it is their responsibility to supply their own children, not their teachers.
     
  27. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    AMEN! Wal-Mart and Big Lots have one subject notebook 10/$1.00
    $.10 a piece!! I had a student last year who said he couldn't afford paper, but he managed to have new shoes, new "toys". It bothers me when parents send the message that education isn't important. I live in a low income area, but people always manage to have money for "toys". They do not stess the importance of a good education. Don't these parents want better for their kids? :confused:
     
  28. paperheart

    paperheart Groupie

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    That's a great idea, Kim.
     
  29. willsgirl

    willsgirl Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2007

    Boy, do I hear that one. I have had kids use the excuse of poverty to justify not having basic supplies like notebook paper, pens, pencils. For the most part, that's all you really have to have for high school. Many schools and/or teachers supply the calcs, rulers, other math stuff. At least the school where I was did -- nothing too techy, expensive, just pretty basic. I don't ask families to buy special books or anything like that. I just want them to have something to write with, basically. It seems ridiculous that these kids could not afford the 10/$1 notebooks as described above (Target had them, too, last w/e) but can come up with an iPod, cellphone, clothes from AE, Abercrombie & Fitch, PacSun and the like (and not season, on sale...I know, my kids like to think they could shop there, LOL). And guess what? The parents of these kids have told me they couldn't afford simple supplies, (they're on food stamps, assistance, etc.) but drive nicer cars than I do!!!

    Someone please explain this to me...
     
  30. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 7, 2007

    The same phenomenon occurs at my school. I really think it's just that education isn't valued in the same way that material objects are in these types of communities. I mean, when you turn on the TV it's all about someone showing off their ride or crib or bling... You never see popular celebrities showing off their diplomas and honor cords and scholarship award letters.

    Plus, I know for absolute fact that several of my students have obtained their techy gadgets and bling by less than legal means, if you know what I'm saying.
     
  31. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oh, and I also think that a sense of entitlement and immediate gratification plays into things as well.

    These are societal problems, not just problems in low-SES communities.
     
  32. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Aug 7, 2007

    Cassie, you are right that these problems transcend socio-economic levels. My school is an "alternative" school, so we get kids from all over the district. Some of our kids live in $500,000 homes while others live in HUD apartments. The wealthier kids have a much larger sense of entitlement than the ones from the poorer communities.
     
  33. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I agree about the sense of entitlement as well, and it is not limited to high school students, either! I have observed students of all grade levels (usually through my daughter's classmates), who just had to have this shirt or those shoes, plus a computer, tv, dvd player and telephone in their own room, a cell phone and $100 hair highlighting jobs! I see people "just starting out", who have a brand new house, 2 new cars, etc. They live in a constant state of debt! Often, credit cards are used to pay off other cards, etc. Anyway, sorry for the rant. The sense of entitlement and need for instant gratification knows no societal boundaries.
     
  34. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2007

    We have definitely become a materialistic society! I don't blame the students for wanting material items, BUT I think their parents should be emphasizing the fact that a good education is much more important. I only require about $7.00 worth of supplies for my class. I even save three-ring binders from the year before that any student is welcome to use. I have gobs :woot: of them!! They were just going to be thrown away, and they were almost like new!

    I know this is off the topic of school supplies, but is on topic with materialism. I'm sure most high school kids today would laugh if they had to attend a prom like mine in 1982! Couples spend more on prom night than I probably did on my wedding.:lol:
     
  35. consideritkids

    consideritkids Rookie

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    Aug 17, 2007

    cost of supplies enormous

    :2cents: I spent almost $100 on my 5th grader's supplies, including Lysol wipes, 2 boxes of Kleenex, required art book, paper, 12 sharpened pencils, 4 pack Dry Erase markers, 4 pack Sharpies, binders, music instrument, required vinyl folders, required vocabulary book, school tshirt, crayons, highlighters, colored pencils, 2 bottles of antibacterial soap, and more. Come to find out, the teacher had everyone dump their supplies together. I hate that. More germs then necessary.
    I also have a freshmen in high school and we didn't even get a list of what he needed until school started. By then nothing is on sale anymore and the lists come home Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday - you're going to the store everyday. Very frustrating.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2007
  36. moonbeamsinajar

    moonbeamsinajar Habitué

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    Aug 18, 2007

    I have 2 children who have gone through public school here in PA. My youngest in a Senior in High School this year. We have never received a list of supplies that they were required to have! Of course, I always bought them the supplies I thought they needed, but the school district never asked families to provide any thing in particular. Now, maybe this is a regional thing, or maybe it just did not happen while my kids were in elementary school. I know my daughter is still given a new pencil every year with the school name on it, an assignment book, and file folders and notebooks for each class. When the notebooks are filled, she can ask the teacher for a new one. These are supplied by the school district, not any particular teacher. This is not a wealthy district, by any means. It has a very high percentage of low-income families. The only thing I ever remember supplying to the whole class was snack, in kindergarten. I also sent in boxes of tissues when my daughter would tell me the classroom was out. I wonder why things are so different here?
     
  37. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    Supplies

    It has only been in recent years that we have sent home a supply list. Each teacher in lur school makes their own list of what they want, but this year we must include a statement that these supplies are "optional". Many parents complained to the school board about the extensive lists sent home by many schools. I have seen list from other schools and it seems the 'richer' schools had long, detailed lists. Our poor school lists were very basic. W
     
  38. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I think part of it might be the ways that the school districts are funded. I may be spewing misinformation right now, but one of my college instructors told his class that regions with high performing students, well-stocked schools and classrooms, tons of new technology, and well-paid teachers were the ones with a distinct and dedicated school tax. Here, we do not have a "school tax," in which funds are set aside and dedicated solely for the use of school funding. Here, the legislators have the opportunity to decide how much the schools actually need.
     
  39. Kindergarten31

    Kindergarten31 Cohort

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    Supplies

    This year our school board has mandated that all supplies lists have the word "optional" or "not required" on them due to the parent complaints about the extensive supply list sent home by some schools. I have seen alot of school lists and it seems the richer schools have very long, detailed lists and poorer schools have just the basics included. It seems a shame that a few greedy teachers can ruin it for the rest of us. All of our Kindergarten teachers send home a simple list, then at the bottom add a Wish List of the things we would like, but aren't really a necessity. There are always the same few parents who send in everything and the same few who send in nothing all year. One of my teammates worked for a service group this summer who provided free backpacks to needy children filled with school supplies and she said the parking lot was filled with Lexus, Cadillacs, Volvos, etc. She was very upset. You always know who can or can't afford to send in things to your class and often the most needy struggle to send in things and the people who can afford it, just don't bother!
     
  40. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2007

    I did the gold star teacher at my WalMart last year (I had A LOT of trouble and never did get my package of samples, apron, etc). Some of the lists were insane, I have to say, though, most of the more outrageous requests were kindergarten/preK level including things like wooden puzzles, handwashing soap, etc. I had one family that I helped fill their lists (I know we technically weren't supposed to, but only the father spoke English, and he didn't speak it well, they had 4 kids to buy supplies for, and just filling those 4 lists probably cost them over $200. I'm sorry, that's crazy. I personally think $20 should be the limit on class supplies. My own list could have been purchased for $5 or less.
     
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