School Counselors

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by SportsJunkie25, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    Jul 24, 2009

    Does anyone know anything about being a school counselor? Is it hard to get a job as a SC? I know this is a teacher's forum but I hear a lot of school counselors were once teachers.

    I'm asking b/c I'm having a hard time choosing my next career. Sometimes I feel like I should pursue teaching (math or science) b/c those jobs are easy to get but I'm more of a 1-on-1 kind of person. I don't like having to control an entire classroom; it drains me and annoys me.

    With that said, seeing as I think I'm the female version of Dr. Phil, and I like helping people organize/plan things, becoming a SC has crossed my mind. Although, I don't want to pursue school counseling if it's going to take me forever to find a job. I need a career that is in demand. Then again, don't we all? Lol.

    Let the advice start flowing. Thanks! :thumb:
     
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  3. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jul 25, 2009

    There was a time I wanted to do this since my undergrad major was psych/behavioral science. I'm now back in school to get my 2nd Masters, this time in Communicative Disorders & Sciences. (I already have one in Education w/ emphasis in Special Ed). I don't know about your area, but it's not mandatory to be a teacher 1st. That's probably all over though.

    Contact districts in your area to see what kind of Masters you need. It may be Educational Psych, School Counseling, or I don't know what other titles it would be. Probably just Psychology as well. Then, I don't know what the exam is called that you'll need to pass or the type of credential you'll need, but you'll need those things for sure too.
     
  4. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2009

    Some districts have 1 counselor, some have several. So, job openings are going to be area dependent.

    I've looked into the degree as a backup in case I ever wanted to leave the classroom (though I can't fathom wanting to be out of the classroom at this point).

    In my state, you have to have a teaching degree. Even though I have a masters degree in applied behavior analysis and a teaching degree, it would take 3 years (including a semester internship) to complete the degree.

    Another thing to consider, school counselors are often responsible for NCLB testing (which takes up HUGE amounts of time) ... our HS counselor works crazy late hours.
     
  5. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2009

    I don't see a high demand for counselors here. It's about like everything else.

    Our counselors very rarely get a chance to actually counsel students. Much of their time is spent scheduling and testing.
     
  6. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2009

    I find this incredibly sad. How did this become part of a school counsellor's job description? It doesn't exactly fit what our guidance counselors do...

    Here in Canada (or I should say New Brunswick, as it very well could differ from province to province) a guidance counselor is required to have a BEd (which requires a Bachelors degree as a prerequisite) and then they need to complete an MEd in the area of guidance and counselling. It's something I am considering long term, but I wouldn't say they are in high demand here. If I was do my masters, it would be so that I would be ready when there was an opening for a guidance counselor.
     
  7. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Jul 25, 2009

    Our guidance counselor does most of the testing, etc. They have other duties too of course but our behavior specialist deals mostly with the child and our school wide behavior program.

    I would imagine that since most schools only have a few of these positions, it might be a hard field to get into.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    That's about how it is here. Also, in TX you have to teach a certain amount of years before you can apply for a counselor job.
     
  9. SportsJunkie25

    SportsJunkie25 Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2009

    Thanks for all of the responses! Interesting...I didn't know most districts required you to teach before becoming a SC. I just thought they made a career change.

    Well yeah, I'll definitely have to check with my district then. The SC programs make it seem like as soon as you finish the program, you can start applying for jobs.
     
  10. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Jul 26, 2009

    Sports -

    See you're in So Cal...in my experience, counselors in California do not have to be former teachers. In fact, most of the counselors at my school are not former teachers (okay, two out of the three). But, we also have lots of interns with us every year, and with the current budget situation in California, I can't imagine the school counselor population rising dramatically over the next few years...you might be able to apply for jobs upon graduation but i'm not sure how many there will be out there...
     

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