Runner and a cryer

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by minnie, Aug 13, 2016.

  1. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Aug 15, 2016

    For outside doors, you block with your body and put up with the kid beating on you.
     
  2. minnie

    minnie Habitué

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    Aug 15, 2016

    Ok so the first day of school was today. I heard his grandpa talking as they were both coming down the hallway towards my classroom. As soon as he reached the door, he stopped and absolutely refused to come in. His grandpa picked him up and took him in the classroom as he screamed and kicked. His mom was there too. When the grandpa put him down, he took a bee line out the door and just sprinted as his mom went after him. I stayed behind to watch after the rest of my class. Then it was time to go outside for the flag salute with the rest of the school. When we lined up outside, he was playing on the playground. I tried to approach him but when he saw, he ran away. I just decided right then and there that I was not going to ignore the rest if my class because of this little guy so I let his mom and grandpa take care of it. So, the rest of us went to class and started our day. About 30 minutes later, the mom walks in holding the student who was kicking and screaming. She wasn't giving in and held him in her lap as he squirmed and yelled. I just went back to reading my story to the rest of the students (they were a little distracted by him but not much). Suddenly, he started to calm down a little as he listened to me read. Then he got quiet and was listening. I then started talking about the rules of the classrooms and rewards they would get for following those rules. The student soon became very engaged. The mom slowly slid him off of her lap. After a few minutes, she snuck out the door and the student didn't even notice.

    He was totally fine the rest of the day. No problems. I even asked all of the students how they felt on the first day of school and he said "happy." Go figure. I really, really hope he doesn't do that again tomorrow.
     
    Backroads and Leaborb192 like this.
  3. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Aug 16, 2016

    Minnie, that is great to hear. I hope it doesn't happen again, but I wouldn't be surprised if it does happen for a while. Some kids have severe separation anxiety or hate change. It seems you all worked as a team to get the child where he needed to be. Mom and Grandpa did what they needed to do and you gave them the space to allow it. I've seen this scenario where the teacher tries to push the parent out with terrible results.
     
  4. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Aug 16, 2016

    Yeah kids can be fun with their bipolar ways!
    ;)
     
  5. HowardCox

    HowardCox New Member

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    Aug 23, 2016

    For engaging students in your classroom teach them by using some playing materials so as engage them .
     
  6. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Aug 31, 2016

    Throwing this out there... based on a kid of mine who liked to break/throw things in class when he got frustrated. I had a heart-to-heart talk (quite a few times) with this child about his actions and how it worried me/made me scared (because I was afraid that he would hurt himself or others by accident) and made me sad (because I can see that he's not happy and not able to learn when he's upset). The more I talked to him about it and how his actions made me feel, the better he got about it - I think perhaps we made a connection with one another and he started realizing his actions could really hurt me (and possibly others).

    Instead of him asking to leave (he thankfully never left the room without permission, although one time he refused to come back and hid in the bathroom unless recess time), I let him know that he could go sit in a secluded spot in my classroom if he needed a break - a break could be that he needed to work by himself, he needed to take a break from the activity if it was frustrating him, or he needed to work through some negative emotions. If he chose that spot, I never commented on it - although I would seek him out at homeroom before recess to ask him if he wanted to talk about what was going on with me (just let me know what happened - not me offering him advice on how to handle it - I just wanted to listen).

    I also made a point of frequently (at least 2 times a class because of his needs) praising him for a job well done. "I'm so happy you were here today to show me/us how you can write a prediction." "You did a great job packing up those supplies today. Do you think you can show your table buddies how to do it now?" Letting him know that his presence in class was important to me and others.
     
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  7. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Sep 2, 2016

    If it makes you feel any better, we still get "runners and criers" in high school...senior girls still cry a lot... :(
     

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