RTI Tier 3 and sp. ed.

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by pete2770, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Sep 30, 2013

    Is this just my district, or is this how it is?

    Supposedly if a kiddo has a goal in reading, math or both; they cannot receive tier 3 interventions with the tier teachers because they are receiving direct teaching through me, the sp. ed. teacher.

    1. Having RTI and me will only help them.

    2. I have no curriculum and have to pull things out of my butt daily. The crappy curriculum I do have, I have to share/copy/borrow from other teachers.

    Honestly, it has me down because I feel like these kids would get a lot more out of time spent in RTI.

    I'm really lost when it comes to making, from scratch, effective reading and math material...and on that end when an IEP annual goal is kid X will bring his reading level from D to F...thanks for that, let me just hop right into my D to F curriculum...oh wait, I don't have that.
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    During my SPED days, a lot of the pull-out services I did were what would be considered Tier 3 type of services, with specialized curriculum.
     
  4. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    I would feel a lot better if I had the specialized curriculum.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Our Tier 3 instruction is a step to having students placed for special education services. I teach Tier 3 math. Mine are under the 5th percentile, and they are generally former special education that tested out in late elementary school or are students who are in the referral process currently.
     
  6. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    I've been told, as a Reading Specialist, that I can't pull those kids that have an IEP. It would be "double dipping". I can, however, push into the classroom and if the child with an IEP, just so happens to hear me as I work with a child that is in RtI, so be it.
     
  7. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Our kids in special Ed don't qualify for tier III either. We do have dedicated curriculums for most things though. Even though they aren't in tier III, I don't see why you couldn't use that curriculum with them. As a general comment on moving reading levels, do you know what reading habits are expected at each level? Those skills need to be taught explicitly, plus phonics/ decoding skills, fluency, and a bank of sight words. Not sure how your classes are set up, but a reading workshop might work with your class.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Sep 30, 2013

    This is how it has been in the districts that I've worked in as well.
     
  9. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    Thanks, this helps more than you might know. ;)
     
  10. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    It sort of sounds like Tier III has actually been designed to be more specialized and intensive than Tier IV (SPED) in your school Pete? Seems a bit odd. In terms of a specialized curriculum, that's pretty unfortunate that you aren't provided any tools or materials to use. I do think at the Tier IV/SPED level a good amount of individualization needs to occur, which necessarily involves moving beyond an entirely prescribed curriculum, but you should still have plenty of materials to plug in based on what your individualized plan for the child is.

    This horse is dead, but I've been saying for a while what a shame it is how poorly RtI is implemented at some schools. In your case it actually sounds like Tier III is pretty awesome and actually provides quality support for kids without needing a SPED label, but it sounds like it's pretty poorly integrated with the rest of the services at the school. This organization IS really what RtI is, though, so if a child were to move from RtI 3 to 4/SPED and receive less effective services, RtI is broken.
     
  11. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    That's how I feel, exactly.

    Then again, the more I look at my job...I think it was created with the intention of eliminating it before tenure can occur as the primary student on my caseload, and I mean...primary as in the most time-soaking student and family you could possibly imagine existing (I don't think anyone could beat me on this, honestly)- will be done with the school right as I move into my tenure yes/no year.

    I really feel like I've been given not even a 1/10 of the materials other SPED teachers in the school have. I literally have to borrow and xerox everything from them...yet they have complete curriculum's and intervention sets.

    It's depressing.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    In my experience RtI is for students that don't qualify for sped. I have seen plenty of situations where tier 2/tier 3 kids were actually getting more interventions than students in sped, which I think is what you're getting at? I think part of it is due to the pressure to get kids to pass the state test. My last school threw all of their resources at "cusp" kids in an effort to get them to pass. Many kids were deemed "too low" for intervention to be "effective" (aka to pass the test) which I thought was horrible.

    In my current school our title 1 program does serve the neediest non-sped students, but the amount of funding they have for their program over the funding for our sped program is ridiculous. I'm the only sped teacher in the school with one .8 para. Title 1 has two full time teachers, a half time teacher, and 4 full time paras. Part of the reason is that my state just passed the READ act which is essentially a kind of "3rd grade guarantee" law that says all 3rd graders will pass the state reading test.

    In the school I student taught at, title 1 actually got pull-out resource type classes with specialized curriculum while sped was "full inclusion" and only got push-in support. I never understood why the supposed "tier 2" students got more resources than the students actually identified for sped.

    Based on these situations my opinion is that people say that students who are already in sped don't have a chance to catch up anyway, while the kids in tier 2/3 might catch up with extra support, so they put all of their resources there. I know in all of the districts I've worked in they've hired what they call "title 1" teachers with non-title money, so it's not simply a difference between title funding and sped funding at the government level.
     
  13. Jlyn07

    Jlyn07 Comrade

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    I'm in NY and an AIS (Title 1) teacher. Any special education student in New York State who qualifies for AIS services based on the district's requirements (in my case, AIMSweb), must receive AIS, in addition to their special education services. The thought is that AIS is a general education service for all students who don't meet the grade level benchmarks and since the sped students most likely will not be meeting those benchmarks they will need to be serviced.
     
  14. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Oct 2, 2013

    That's too bad Pete. Really sounds like you've been set up for failure. Started looking elsewhere yet?
     
  15. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Oct 3, 2013

    Sounds to me like the goal is written with guided reading leveling system. If this is the system used at your school. A level D is beginning of first grade. Level F is about mid first grade. DRA2 levels 6 and 10 respectively. (I have a student with this goal).

    Previously I was a reading resource (general ed, non intervention) teacher and worked with these levels. If your school has a bookroom with leveled readers that would be a good bet to find those resources.

    www.pennsaukenlibrary.org/ReadingConversionChart.pdf‎
    has a reading level chart.

    I am a special ed resouce teacher (I'm tier III). I see students for between 30 minutes and 2 hours a day. Some of my students I see for reading, writing, and math. I feel this isn't enough. I'm a half day teacher and see everyone at the same time. I will have two SPIRE groups, 1 Sounds Sensible Group, and a general reading comprehension group. Three of the students also get math and/or writing. It is tough. I service B level students.

    Two of my students are missing a half hour of services a week which scares me (I'm a new teacher) because when they were evaluated for services they were not evaluated for math so they have to go to RtI. Due to my schedule and thiers I am not sure when I will get those hours in.
     
  16. MrShiva

    MrShiva Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2013

    Hello! Can someone tell who Tier is? and what is the role of Tier in school?

    and also the RTI? Thank you!
     

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