RTI - How does it work at your school?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by SpecialEdTeache, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. SpecialEdTeache

    SpecialEdTeache Companion

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    Jul 24, 2009

    Hi everyone!

    I'm sure that I'll be asked about RTI at my interview next wk., so I wondered if anyone could give examples of how it works at your school. My concern is that there may not be enough IAs or parent volunteers who have had the RTI training to work one-on-one with the students who still don't do well enough on the tests to stay in the small groups or go back to the classrooms for reading.

    I would really appreciate examples of how RTI worked successfully at your school.

    Thanks for all of your input!
     
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  3. missapril81

    missapril81 Companion

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    Jul 27, 2009

    i am new to special education but i really wish that i could help you. i still have a couple weeks before i start my training.
     
  4. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 27, 2009

    For me, I don't really have much involvement in the RTI process. It all happens before they are identified and become my student.

    At my school, teachers must document the problem behavior/area. Then they must provide documentation to prove the baseline problem, and any interventions tried in the classroom. We have intervention teachers who also provide data. If they still haven't improved with all the interventions, they are referred for evaluation. If they qualify for special education services, then I become involved in the process with observations, or attending the meeting, then writing the IEP and implementing it.

    Hope this helps some...
     
  5. txmomteacher2

    txmomteacher2 Enthusiast

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    Jul 27, 2009

    At my old school where i taught both special and then oneyear of regular classroom it was pretty simple process. When I was the special ed teacher (first campus implemented RTI) in grades k-3 mainly 2 and 3 we put all the spec ed kids in one room during small group. They got there grade level instruction and then when it came time for work they would get work on their level. There weren't than many students to work with so it worked out ok. My next year when I was moved to kindergarten it worked a little different. We set parameters and those kids who did not meet those qualifications off a specific test that the state gives them (3 times a year) they were put into small groups. They were given whole group instruction and then small group too. The one part that I had issues with was, those who were lowest of the low's didnt not get small goup instruction they went straight to the reading specialist. So they were missing 30 minutes of small group instruction that they should have been given as well as the 90 minutes and then 3rd tier group time. I fought and fought for it but the reading specialist was her way or the highway. (the reading specialist and i went to grad school together and took the same reading classes) She knew i was correct but it was the a principal issue. The principal hated me and loved her.
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jul 27, 2009

    The way my district does it is they have three levels of intervention. They use informal and formal assessments to determine who qualifies. Depending on what the teacher observes, some students only need a few minutes of small group of additional instruction, others need more than just small group of instruction, and the third level is the most severe group and need alot of small group/one-to-one instruction.
     
  7. SpecialEdTeache

    SpecialEdTeache Companion

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    Jul 30, 2009

    Thanks everyone. It doesn't sound like the kids who don't bring up their scores after a while in small group are all getting one-on-one help. That step in the RTI process is important because some kids have an interpersonal learning style, and could improve a lot with one-on-one. That's the third tier.

    Thanks so much for all of your comments. That helps me a lot :)
     
  8. karebear76

    karebear76 Habitué

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    Jul 30, 2009

    I cannot get anyone locally to back me up when I say the intent of the 3 tiers...

    My district uses replacement reading and math, so the spec ed kids go to the special ed teacher when their regular class is having those subjects. There are no tiers, nor any differentiation.

    The theory is that your general population gets the instruction in the classroom, then a smaller percentage needs the general instruction, plus an additional 30 minutes of intervention, and the smallest percentage (identified students with IEPs) need the general instruction, the 30 minutes of intervention, and then 30 additional minutes of intensive remediation (IEP goal work). I can't get anyone to even try to implement this. The supposed experts (that have taught me this model) won't back me up in front of my admin. :banghead:

    So I always just feel like this: :beatdeadhorse:
     

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