Round Robin Reading and reading a textbook story in class

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by Peachyness, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jun 15, 2007

    I've started thinking about our story anothologies that we will be reading in our reading program. When I taught kinder, this is how we read those stories. We would all first read out loud together. Then, I had them whisper read the story. Then, I would have them read the story together while I listened. Then, later on, with my aide, they would read the story by themself.

    Now, that I will be teaching 5th, how do you read these stories. Obviously, the most common method of reading these stories is to do round robin reading where you pick students at random, or volunteers, to read a section of the story. You go around the room until you read the story.

    But, I learned that round robin reading is ineffective. Many students are singled out because of their low reading level, some read ahead, reherse the passage, then volunteer to read, thus defeating the whole purpose, and so on.

    So, how do you guys read a story together in class? I distinctly remember observing a 4th grade teacher doing something like this: they had already read the story(not sure how), the next day, the students broke into pairs or triads and read the story outloud to each other. This was mainly to practice fluency. Alright, so there's one idea on how to read the story outloud. But, the first time around, the whole class reading is where I'm stuck on.

    :cool: :thanks:
     
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  3. natjoejag

    natjoejag Companion

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    Jun 15, 2007

    I always read the story to them first. Just like a read-aloud. I either read it from the original story book or from the basil. Sometimes I have them follow along, but more often than not they just listen while I read. This seems to get them into the story and enjoying it. On the proceeding days we usually just read parts of the story to enhance what I am trying to teach them about comprehension. I do not use my basil to teach fluency, so much. I use it as a read aloud to teach comprehension strategies. Very seldom do I do anything the basil tells me to do as far as teaching goes!
     
  4. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    This year I had several struggling readers. Because of this reason I didn't use Round Robin. I read the selection aloud with some help from very fluent readers. In the past, however, I would put each students' name on a popsicle stick and pull names from a can. The students never knew who I would call on because I would always put the sticks back in the can. I called on a few students more than once just so they would think I did not know whose stick I would pull. I knew whose stick I was pulling though.( I do this if all of my students are reading on grade level). After we read the selection together I put them in peppermint pairs(I group them according to ability, and give them a piece of peppermint to eat while reading). I also use radio reading.
     
  5. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    I remember a saying my mentor teacher once told me in the beginning, "The Robin is dead. People keep trying to resurrect him. The only thing that's ever been resurrected is Jesus, not the Robin. The days of the Robin are gone."

    I also use the basals mainly for teaching comprehension strategies or for read alouds.

    I know you assign reading to the students. Perhaps you could call on several students each day to read their favorite part of the story, and everyone can follow along. Then, they could tell why it's their favorite part. Or perhaps you could have them look for certain elements that you are trying to teach and they could read that page out loud. I don't think that this resurrecting the Robin.
     
  6. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Can you explain radio reading please? Thanks! I love your idea o peppermint while reading. Now, do they read aloud with the peppermint in their mouth??
     
  7. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jun 15, 2007

    Thanks everyone for your responses. I thought about just reading the whole story aloud, but then wondered if my throat would get raw. We do have all stories on a cassette tape. But, the teachers at my school first read the story together, then, later listen to it on tape. Do you think I should first read the story with the tape??
     
  8. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    The students are paired. So while one person is reading the other is eating his/her peppermint. Radio Reading a is strategy that helps with fluency. The students must first read a particular part of the selection fluently several times. Once they have done this, I put them in groups and they read their sections as if it is a radio program.( This is just my version of Radio Reading. Someone else may do it differently) I'm not an advocate of Round Robin. I allow my students to read because they probably get tired of hearing me read. My method is not necessarily RR because I call on students randomly. It keeps them alert and focused.
     
  9. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 15, 2007

    I have never used a basal for 5th grade. I can't imagine doing round robin with a story. Doesn't it take forever? And you do this every week? I'd go nuts.
     
  10. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jun 15, 2007

    When my students are reading new material, either we do it as a shared reading activity or they read with a partner. Rarely in my room is everyone reading the same thing at the same time (unless it is history or science). On those odd occasions when a student reads aloud to the whole class, it is on a strictly volunteer basis--I never call on students at random.
     
  11. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Yes, it's really ridiculous. I plan to do readers workshop, but that's my own thing. Our program wants us to read a story over and over and over again. I believe they read the same story 3-4 times a week. It's ridiculous!
     
  12. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I like the idea of doing it as a shared reading activity, but our program wants us to read the story together, as a class, and then discuss some strategies.

    I'm sure I could do the shared reading or partner reading the next day after we read together. I'm just trying to figure out a good way to read the story the first time around.
     
  13. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Jun 15, 2007

    When I first started in second grade the first thing we did was listen to the story on tape while the kids followed along in their textbooks and I stopped for comprehension checks. Then Wednesday they parter read the story. They did pretty good with it in second grade. They new the procedure when I came in half way through the year so I stuck with it.

    I teach first grade now and I don't use the basal anymore. I was so turned off by the first book that I didn't use it all year, but there actually were some good stories in there down the road. I just don't like using the basal because it's not going to benefit all students. Last year I only had two students *at* grade level! I had a bunch that were higher, and I had a pretty large group of low students. I couldn't imagine putting a "grade level" text in front of them and going, "Here, now read this!" They'd be so frustrated, and my higher kids would be so bored. Anyway, I love the reader's workshop because we do comprehension minilessons that EVERYONE can take part in, and then they go and apply the skills at their level.

    EDIT: sorry about my rant... I didn't really answer your question... :sorry:
     
  14. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    Same here Miss Kirby. What model does your school follow? We're supposed to follow the below format for Reader's Workshop, although most of us do what we choose to do.
    Independent Reading
    Mini-lesson
    Guided Reading/Centers
    Closing/Share Time
    I know several teachers that just use the Basal Readers and do a story for the whole week. Teacher reads the story, teacher & students read the story, listen to the story on tape, Partner read the story, and independently read the story. Like you, Miss Kirby, I find that my high students are bored and my lowest students are frustrated. I dropped the basal readers after my first year of teacher and just followed the Workshop format with Guided Reading. I use the stories when I can as Shared Reading and Read Alouds to teach reading comprehension.

    I'm thinking of making the book as part of Buddy Reading during centers. What do you guys think?
     
  15. MissMcCollum

    MissMcCollum Companion

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    Jun 15, 2007

    The reading series our district adopted two years ago has us read the anthology a few times a week, plus leveled readers. I found it very ineffective during student teaching and don't plan on using it a lot. What I did do, though, was have the students listen to the story on CD first, because they are not all at grade level, but their listening comp is way higher, and then chose some activities from the series to go along with it. We also have the leveled readers on CD, and I may have them listen to them in centers, though I haven't decided for sure. It's ridiculous to try and force kids to read books that are well beyond them, only to have them ridiculed and singled out by their peers.
     
  16. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Whenever I called on students randomly it was never forced. They even had the opportunity to pass(which they rarely did). Everyone would want to read at once, so calling them randomly also insured that everyone would get the chance.
     
  17. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    We generally do round robin reading with social studies and that is plenty. My 5th graders would never have stood for reading a story 3 or 4 times, oh my gosh. I'm switching to 3rd next year so I will use the basal - but we'll read it together first along with the CD.
     
  18. Erin Elizabeth

    Erin Elizabeth Groupie

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    Jun 15, 2007

    Peachyness, do you use Open Court or Hougton-Mifflin?
     
  19. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    I didn't read all of the posts so I'm sorry if this has already been said. I would NEVER do round robin reading. If you go around the room and have them read aloud, all they will be doing is trying to figure out what part they are going to have to read and not pay attention to the rest of the story. That being said, I do have them read aloud. I have the whole class read the page to themselves and then a volunteer reads it aloud.
     
  20. divey

    divey Companion

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    Jun 17, 2007

    At our school, we are expected to use the basal (which in our case consists of one story/week). Last year I usually followed this format for the week: Listen to the story on tape, vocabulary/comprehension test/read aloud whole group/read aloud small group. Needless to say, it was MIND-NUMBING!!!!! I desperately want to use guided reading in addition to using the basal. Any suggestions on how to incorporate the 2 so that I'm still teaching the basal, but also using real books to teach them to really read/enjoy reading?
     
  21. Miss Starr

    Miss Starr Companion

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    Jun 17, 2007

    We sometimes do "popcorn reading" which is a variation on round robin reading that my students enjoy. Students read aloud until they want to stop...at which time they say "Pop" and the next student must immediately start reading from the correct place. It keeps them paying attention to the stroy and from reading ahead. If a student does not want to read they just say "pop" immediately and can skip a turn. For the most part my students love reading aloud or they have practiced the story already and feel confident with the reading. Just another strategy.
     
  22. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Corps, my school doesn't really have a model for reading right now. The principal provides us with resources but it's up to the teacher on how he/she implements it.... which is great! The reading specialist is pushing the reader's workshop model and I know several other teachers are going to try it this year. I use the same schedule as you do.
     
  23. yclark

    yclark Comrade

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    I know my instructors have all discouraged Round Robin. I do use a variation during Science and Social Studies lessons (similar to Miss Star's popcorn reading) except that I do it with groups so everyone has to pay attention. A group will be called on to read, not just a person. For example, everyone with buttons on their shirt, then everyone with a team shirt. This includes more students and the random timing and grouping keeps everyone involved.
     
  24. corps2005

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    I wonder if for this idea would work for Science and Social Studies. Present the students with a series of questions that they have to answer. In order to find the answer, they would have to read section. You could put them into groups to discuss it. Thoughts?
     
  25. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    I do a Kagan structure (don't know what it's called) similar to this... What we usually do is read something together and pose a problem, they discuss in teams, and (my students have table numbers) I call a number and everyone who has that number stands up and shares with the class what their table decided upon. You could do this with reading science/social studies. Read a small part, discuss with tables, then share with the class what they read, the main idea, a question they have, whatever skill you are working on.
     
  26. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    This works really well--it provides purpose for their reading and gives them a focus.
     
  27. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    I used this a lot in Science and SS, but I found that the students only scanned the chapters for the answers. They did not read the entire section. Towards the end of school I would give them a time limit to read, and only provide the answers when time was up. With so much time and no questions they had no choice but to read. After each group was finished I would have them present their questions and answers to the class. They really enjoyed it.
     
  28. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2007

    I just started reading a book called "Goodbye Round Robin". It has a lot of great ideas on how to teach reading comprehension and strategies without having to do it in the round robin format. Great reading lesson ideas in there PLUS they suggest reading books for each lesson. So, if you're looking for a good summer read, this book is great. I can see a LOT of these lessons being used for reader's workshop.
     
  29. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Thanks for sharing this! I love this idea. I will write this down in my idea book. :)
     

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