Rosetta Stone (Spanish)

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Suburban Gal, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    Feb 16, 2009

    Alrighty, given my huge kickback of financial aid money, I'm strongly considering buying the first module of Rosetta Stone for Spanish.

    If there's a demand for anything in education, I think it's for bilingual teachers and paras.

    I think if I can claim "polite" for Spanish in terms of listening and speaking on the online applications that'll increase my chances 10 fold of landing something. My phone should be ringing off the hook by claiming "polite" for Spanish.

    What do you think? :unsure:
     
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  3. dizzykates

    dizzykates Habitué

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    I think it is looked at positively, however schools often need people who can do their own translating or in a pinch serve as a translator in the office until the real one arrives (if the school has someone). I claim literate and conversational, yet some of those conversations are too deep for me. I would be careful unless you are ready to translate for someone.
     
  4. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    I have Rosetta Stone. My husband used to be fluent and he bought it to brush up. It's a very easy to use program, but in my opinion you'd do better taking a class along with Rosetta Stone. I think the level you're looking for is "conversational" Spanish - not fluent, but able to hold a simple conversation. To me, "polite" just means you know a few words and phrases - which is where you'll be with the 1st module of Rosetta Stone.
     
  5. emmakate218

    emmakate218 Connoisseur

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    In my opinion, school districts are only going to look to those that can prove their fluency through taking and passing a certification test. In Texas and most other places that have a huge need for bilingual teachers and paraprofessionals, there are going to be hundreds of candidates that can speak Spanish above and beyond anyone that taught themselves through Rosetta Stone or by taking a couple Spanish classes. You'll be blown out of the water, especially anywhere with a huge need for bilingual teachers because where there's Spanish speaking children, there's Spanish speaking adults that are looking for work and if they want to work in the education field, they're in.

    Go for it by all means though, it can't hurt, but good luck!
     
  6. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Feb 16, 2009

    emma's right. I know here you have to take a certification test, not just written but spoken as well in order to teach bilingual ed.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    I would definitely take the second and third module fo attain eventually be on a conversational or fluent level,

    I know my district has the tendancy to hurt so much for bilingual people that they'll hire someone on a "polite" level just to have someone in the classroom. I believe some of the other low-income districts with issues are like that too.

    I tried taking Conversational Spanish I at the local community college a few years back, but dropped it. I was so confused. The instructor was half Puerto Rican and half Columbian and tended to mix the Spanish. (The speak Spanish differently in Puerto Rico than they do in Columbia.) Since he teaches the bulk of the Spanish courses, I elected not to try again.

    What if that person is a native speaker of the language and has known if fluently it since childhood?

    I could quite possibly see myself having to that if I was going to be a bilingual teacher, but I'm just looking to be a para for the time being. So, I can't imagine having to take that.

    Technically, I'm half latino (my father was Mexican and Puerto Rican), even though I always mark myself as caucasian on forms and the like. If I can get up to a conversational or even fluent level, who's going to even know that it's a second language? Unless I tell them, they won't even know.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 16, 2009

    You do understand that it takes, on average, 10-15 years to become fluent in a foreign language? It's not something you do overnight, over the course of a couple of years, or through a self-taught program like Rosetta Stone.

    Rosetta Stone is probably good for the traveler or the person who just wants to expand their knowledge. For the person who wants to actually use Spanish, particularly in an academic setting, it just isn't going to cut it. I'm sorry if I sound harsh--I don't mean to be. It's just that I'm a foreign language teacher and I see how much work it takes, day in and day out, to even move from the "novice/beginner" stage to the "intermediate" stage.

    I'm not sure how it is in Texas, but here in Nevada, we have a huge Spanish-speaking population. While most of my Spanish-speaking students are from Mexico or have parents from Mexico and therefore speak Mexican Spanish, I have plenty (dozens and dozens) of students from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua. Each country/area has its own special spin on Spanish, its own slang, and its own unique grammar. "Border" Spanish is different even from all those other ones.

    In my opinion, if you can't handle Spanish from a Puerto Rican or Spaniard or whatever, you probably won't be able to handle all those other forms as well.

    Furthermore, having an academic knowledge of Spanish is a lot different from being able to hold a conversation. Many people who are "advanced" Spanish speakers, even fluent ones, may not know the words which are super common in a school or classroom setting.

    If you want to know Spanish to get by or to be "polite" then consider taking a Spanish for Teachers course. Your local university probably offers one. If a local school district is large enough, they might even offer one. Ours does, and it's a program called Reality Spanish. In any event, I'm not sure that a "polite" (read: "novice") understanding of Spanish is going to get your resume noticed a whole heck of a lot.
     
  9. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Even if they are native speakers, they would still need to take the certification/speaking exam. That's for teachers. As far as I know, paras around here don't need any type of degree.
     
  10. Windy City

    Windy City Companion

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    Feb 16, 2009

    I wouldn't waste my money on Rosetta Stone. There are so many public libraries in the northern suburbs that own it and have it available to check out. Don't waste financial aid money on that. I am currently paying back my student loans, and I wish that I wouldn't have taken out as much as I did (bye-bye paycheck!).

    Should you take this route, I would be *very* careful about how you approach principals. Be honest about your level of fluency. You wouldn't just have to worry about the students... you would be expected to communicate with parents as well. If you make your principal believe that you are more fluent than you are, then ask for assistance in dealing with parents, you could find yourself in a big mess.
     
  11. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    I can speak polite Spanish, and found it did not help me at all when trying to speak with mono-Spanish. It did help me communicate with the toddlers in Spanish. Complete immersion is a great way to learn Spanish.
     
  12. K-5Teacher

    K-5Teacher Rookie

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    Like you, I have started to study Spanish for future use in a classroom setting. I am taking a class at a local community college. Before I marked anything on an application, I talked it over with my professor. She, like others here, strongly encouraged me to be very honest and open in the fact that I have limited Spanish (which is what I was planning on doing). I have subbed in Dual Language classrooms (both before I started taking Spanish and after) and the class has helped me tremendously as I can understand more and say a few more words than I could have before I started taking Spanish. That being said, I am very hesitant to say I am even polite in Spanish on a resume. I am more willing to say I have started classes and will continue to further this education for my own benefit. Yes, I want it to be able to understand Spanish children in my classroom and to help my career but I also need it for my second job and I want it for myself. I also think a college class is a better way to learn than the Rosetta Stone program. I think the program is great for supplementing the class but I learn so much more from the class than I would from a computer program.
     
  13. buenasuerte

    buenasuerte New Member

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    Oct 24, 2011

    pretty old!! pero está bien

    :yawn: well i am using Rosetta stone and i am on level 2. I found it pretty useful(i know lot of people they would start shouting on this)
    but it's true. It's one of the best and easiest language learning solution BUT no es fácil para usar ¿cómo?
    But you aren't suppose to supplement yourself with any type of grammer books or audio courses like pimsleur(believe me otherwise you'll ruin the whole concept/idea of RS.)
    If you have prior knowledge(like basic or blah blah) still it's fine for you. It's very boring after level1 it gets harder and harder but you remember words.
    It teaches you step by step(Do not listen to others...they all were losers who weren't able to finish it and now yawning and crying that it doesn't work.
    True it's not gonna make you native fluent or something like that
    in your desired language but it'll give you very good foundation.
    No other product would give you this much like RS would give you.
    (I know the only thing i hate about RS is their advertisements--they say you will learn it very soon but it's not true...it takes years to master a language.)
    But Rosetta stone is a very good supplement to have pretty good understanding and much better than other supplements out there.
    Ofcourse you might see after finishing it.(i meant all 5levels..yes if you are not going to buy all 5levels than atleast buy 3levels not anything less than that because it's not worth it--first two levels are sort of vocabulary builders and have basic frases.
    Many people they find it very boring and they don't finish the whole course(Losers) and they start crying.
    I am one of the user of RS(spanish-latin america)
    I am on level 2 right now and many times i stumbled and didn't understand many things but carefully noticed each and every picture, the expressions they had in those pictures and found them very interesting and found it was slowly(very slowly) building a foundation for me.
    And it enhanced my listening skills also(sí aún recuerdo cuando yo estaba mirando una pelicula se llama "tres metros sobre el cielo" esta pelicula es de españa" pero yo lo estaba entiendo y mucho de esto.

    Things what Rosetta stone will not teach you:-
    1) No slangs/no abuses(whole life is there, first learn the basics and learn the language.)
    2) It'll not teach you verb conjugation but once you'll be through with the language you can work on that.
    remember even when we go to different english countries we encounter different new idioms and different new words. =)
    3)After finishing all your levels of Rosetta stone practice and practice.
    By chatting, by watching movie in your favourite language, listening, reading(everyday)....you'll learn more by doing this.

    And if possible then you can go the country where se hablan su idioma favorita.
    4)Always remember some languages are easy to learn and some they take lot of time depending how close is that language with your mother tongue.
    5)If you are a self learner than you need to give time to it. Atleast 1hour a day(and try to play the audio tapes of the conversation also while driving jogging--sounds boring but it's para mejorar.)
    And after 3months-12months time you will see significant change(Only if you were regular and practising.)

    Last but not the least i speak 4different languages(English is not my first language and my parents they don't english-even now.)
    I am not perfect in this language however i have very good knowledge of it and can easily hold a verbal conversation as well.(Native fluency is almost not possible until you don't live among them.---because language changes in every 10years...new slangs...new abuses jajjjaajajajajajaj.) But basics they remain the same.

    First learn the basics then improve your listening skills and then practice your pronunciation and then try to communicate with the natives.(text chat, voice chat etc etc.)

    That's it whatever you start be it RS or xyz first finish it all and then share your reviews.
    Because even a 2dollars frase could be useful if used properly.


    Thanks.
     

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