Roman Empire Cross Curriculum Project Inquiry

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by chessimprov, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. chessimprov

    chessimprov Rookie

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    Nov 2, 2010

    My school is doing a cross-curriculum project on the Roman Empire for 9th Grade. I'd love some ideas and any help I can get. For math, I know what I want to work on basic shapes, Roman numerals, and scaling (i.e. a 5000 ft length aqueduct can be represented as 2 cm on a piece of paper).

    Thank you very much!
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2010
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  3. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Nov 2, 2010

    Totally out of my league... but I bet a fun (and educational in SO many ways) culminating projeect would be to create a model of a building or a whole city... I did a model of a Pompeiian house for a project when I was in jr. high (complete with Lego guys in toilet-peper togas)... I learned so much doing that and it was FUN which motivated me to keep working on it.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 2, 2010

    Could they read or watch Shakespear's Julius Caesar?

    For science, could they learn about how an arch stays up??(That's the right time period, right???) Or how the aqueducts actually worked?
     
  5. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Nov 2, 2010

    There's tons of science and math stuff you can do with them.

    The arch and aqueducts are just the tip of the ice burg. You can do mapping looking at the rates of growth of the empire over time, figure out taxes, how long it would take get somewhere in the empire, percentages of slaves in the empire (at one point there were 10 million slaves in the Roman empire and it wasn't just blacks who were slaves back then), etc.

    Lots of graphing and charting as well to present such data.
     
  6. chessimprov

    chessimprov Rookie

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    Nov 7, 2010

    Good ideas Muttling! Have to figure out how to put all this together from scratch :/

    For science, they are planning on discussing sanitation issues and maybe even taking a trip to PNL Park. I do not know what PNL park is, and it's possible that that teacher got the acronym completely wrong.

    Art is building stuff, probably the aqueduct, and he is considering graffiti, other things I think, and maybe the human form (I know I wouldn't want to touch topic this unless I was at a primarily arts school as an art teacher).

    English I believe is doing something with Shakespeare, and S.S. I cannot remember.

    Feeling so stressed out about everything :/
     
  7. Muttling

    Muttling Devotee

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    Nov 7, 2010

    My BS is in Civil Engineering and my focus was hydraulics & hydrology (e.g. the study of how water moves.)

    If you send me a jpg of what they're doing in art for the viaducts and I can show you how to calculate the rate of the water flow.

    Your kids will have to draw an x-y diagram showing the side view (called an "elevation view") of the channel. Then they have to get the slope from the diagram they drew.

    They'll need to also draw a cut away view showing the cross section of the channel and depth of the water in it. From that, they'll come up with the area of the water filling the channel in the cut away and the wetted perimeter (e.g. the length of the sides of the channel that the water is touching.)

    Finally, I'll give you the formula for them to plug those numbers into and calculate how many gallons of water per minute flowing through it.

    They can make posters showing the process of making these calculations.

    If you want to go a step further, you can have them do the calculations for several depths of water in the channel and come up with a graph showing how the rate of water flow varies with the depth of water in the channel. (It follows an exponential growth function.)
     
  8. chessimprov

    chessimprov Rookie

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    Nov 21, 2010

    No pic for viaducts or anythign will be available. I just have to come up with some curriculum building as much as possible. It will be the first time for a grade wide cross curricular project.

    Anyone know anything about Roman arches or aqueducts and how shapes can apply? I keep thinking that the fulcrum of one of these two is a triangle, but I cannot find any resource to say that. All I find is that Roman arches have a keystone in the center.
     
  9. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Nov 21, 2010

    The aqueduct is made up of triangles I believe. One of my students made me one out of Popsicle sticks, toothpicks, and straws. It was really neat and actually worked to move water.
     

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