Rigor....Is this really appropriate for Kindergarten?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by suzy7677, Feb 25, 2016.

  1. suzy7677

    suzy7677 Rookie

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    Feb 25, 2016

    I understand raising the infinite bar and pushing the kids but check out the definition for the word of the year. I hear it about 12 times a day...
    There was a really funny fb post that was about teachers new years resolutions and it said...I promise to not throw something at the next meeting when someone says rigor or differentiation for the 100th time, lol~ The other word of the year in our district is fidelity, augghhghgh. LOL
    • rigors : the difficult and unpleasant conditions or experiences that are associated with something
    • severity (2) : the quality of being unyielding or inflexible : strictness (3) : severity of life : austerityb : an act or instance of strictness, severity, or cruelty

    • 2: a tremor caused by a chill

    • 3: a condition that makes life difficult, challenging, or uncomfortable; especially : extremity of cold

    • 4: strict precision : exactness <logical rigor>

    • 5a obsolete : rigidity, stiffnessb : rigidness or torpor of organs or tissue that prevents response to stimulic : rigor mortis
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Feb 26, 2016

    "Rigor is not defined by the text -- it comes from what students do. It is not standard across a curriculum -- it is individual to each student's needs. It is not quantified by how much gets crammed into a school day -- it is measured in depth of understanding.

    Rigor is a result, not a cause.

    There it is. Rigor is the result of work that challenges students' thinking in new and interesting ways. It occurs when they are encouraged toward a sophisticated understanding of fundamental ideas and are driven by curiosity to discover what they don't know.

    Let us aspire to something greater than making difficult work for our students. Let's take them to that intersection of encouragement and engagement, where they confront ideas and problems that are meaningful. Let's stretch their thinking. Let's unleash their sophistication. And let's foster a love of deep knowledge."

    https://www.edutopia.org/users/brian-sztabnik

    You may want to follow up with the next link. IMHO, rigor is about creating interest, fostering curiosity, and the love of learning.

    http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct08/vol66/num02/Rigor-Redefined.aspx
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2016
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  4. suzy7677

    suzy7677 Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2016

    Those look like some wonderful resources. It was meant to be satirical. :)
     
  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Feb 26, 2016

    I agree with both suzy7677 and Vickilyn. By coincidence, I had journaled concerning this just last night. This is where my thoughts were....

    Too often in today’s society it seems students are being pushed way beyond what they are able to accomplish at their level of understanding. Some of what I learned in high school is now being taught in elementary school. Some of what I learned in first and second grade is now being taught in Kindergarten. This isn’t all bad. We’ve learned even more of what students can accomplish at various grade levels. But, as Vicki Abeles describes in her book, Beyond Measure, teachers today are asked to teach more than might be possible to adequately cover in one school year. In my experience, there are two ways to accomplish this overload of material; teach too quickly or overload the students with homework to keep up the pace of the curriculum. Abeles spends a large portion of her book questioning the productivity of excessive homework.

    Often this abundance of material is covered in the lower realm of a taxonomy of learning. The main goal today is for students to pass a (or several) standardized tests, (tests that are being interpreted far beyond their original intent). Critical thinking skills are still taught, but integrated wherever they can be shoved into the lessons. Do standardized tests really measure a teacher’s ability to teach or a student’s ability to learn? Do standardized tests accurately measure upper level thinking skills?
    Source: Abeles, Vicki; Grace Rubenstein. Beyond Measure: Rescuing an Overscheduled, Overtested, Underestimated Generation. N.Y.: Simon and Schuster, 2015.
     
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  6. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Mar 2, 2016

    My district has also jumped on the "rigor" bandwagon. What they expect of kindergarten students now is ridiculous!! In my opinion, these demands and lack of play and "increased rigor" lead to many more behavior problems and just general unhappiness. We are not allowed to so anything fun in kinder.. No play centers, art projects, 10 mins of recess a day, and lots of worksheets... I had students playing math games at a center and was told this was not acceptable! They were learning games... I really hope there is a large scale shift back to accepting developmental learning (each young child learns at their pace in kinder.. Some kids can read and others aren't ready for it) and increased play.. Rigor is not what's needed in kindergarten.
     
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  7. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Mar 3, 2016

    It'd be fun, if not probably boat-rocking, to demand research presented in favor of that kind of kinder experience.
     
  8. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Mar 3, 2016

    Very interesting! We are swinging back the other way and revamping our province's play based documents to support learning through play in the early years. The big push is in kindergarten right now, but I won't be surprised if it trickles up to grades 1 & 2 as well. Our kindergarten programs are required to have 45 min - 1 hour of free choice play per day in a half day program and 2 hours per day in a full day program. The teacher is to be intentional in extending and fostering learning opportunities within the students' free play.

    This document was first issued in the early '80s, so take heart, you will likely move back to a play based curriculum. I'm sorry you aren't seeing it right now, but we know education is a pendulum.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2016
  9. Newkindermom

    Newkindermom Rookie

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    Mar 3, 2016

    I have actually seen many articles recently citing studies and evidence about the importance of play, and how it actually improves academic scores/abilities in the long run as well as improves social skills. My district, however, does not do any reading apparently.
     
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