"Right match"

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by NewSoCalTeacher2017, Jun 17, 2018.

  1. Been There

    Been There Habitué

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    Jul 7, 2018

    I'm not sure what you mean. Would you care to elaborate?
     
  2. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2018

    This is my experience, too. I learn everything I can about the school and district and then I tailor my answers to show how my beliefs line up with the school's. For example, in my last interview, I knew that inquiry was important to the school. So I made sure to touch upon how I use open ended questions and I'm learning more about inquiry. I was myself, but I haven't brought those topics up in other interviews because they haven't seemed relevant. I knew this was important to this school, so I used multiple examples across a number of the interview questions to really highlight my beliefs about wonder and inquiry.

    When they asked if I was musical, because they are also looking for a music teacher, I gave an emphatic "NO". I cannot and will not pretend to be a music teacher!
     
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  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 8, 2018

    I don't see that as giving them what they want to hear simply for the purpose of getting the job. If you believed in inquiry, too, then you were being genuine. You had just prepared by researching the school and knowing how you would fit in there, and then you attempted to articulate that in the interview. Now, if you did not believe in inquiry and pretended to just so that you could get the job, then I'd say you were faking it. If that was the case, you might have ended up getting the job, but would it be a job that you'd really want? Aside from people who are desperate for any job to pay the bills, are there really people out there who want to work at a school whose philosophy is not in line with their own?
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
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  4. Been There

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    Jul 9, 2018

    What do YOU think? Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like you believe that teachers in general hold themselves to high moral standards. That may be your experience, but definitely not mine.:(
     
  5. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 9, 2018

    I don’t think of it as a high moral standard necessarily. I just think of it as comfort. I don’t think I’d be comfortable working in a school where the values don’t align to my own. Teaching is stressful enough when you are in a place where the values align. Why would anyone want the added stress of having to be someone who they’re not or spending time on tasks they don’t find important? I’ve worked in schools that didn’t align to my beliefs or didn’t live up to my standard before, and I’d never go back unless out of desperation to pay my bills.
     

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