rica video examination

Discussion in 'Other Tests' started by tomanytests, Aug 24, 2004.

  1. tomanytests

    tomanytests Guest

    Aug 24, 2004

    HI everyone, congratulations to all who passed this last CSET. I now have the RICA to take. Has anyone taken the RICA video examination? The RICA has the option of the regular exam (multiple choice, essays) or the Video Performance Exam. I was thinking about trying the VIdeo one but I don't know much about it, or anyone who has tried to pass the exam by video. Any info on that exam would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
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  3. ABCD1234

    ABCD1234 Rookie

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    Jan 8, 2005

    I took the RICA on December 4, and just found out I passed. There is not a lot of info on this forum for the RICA, as there is in abundance for the CSET!!! So, I am here to try and give some 411 on it, as I know how reading encouraging words can be somewhat a boost of confidence!

    My classmate gave me an old version of the Ready for RICA by Dr. James Zarillo ( a green paperback book) - there is a new version now, but either way - it is by a great professor - Dr. Zarillo. This is all I studied to pass the exam. My classmate who gave it to me told me, "Just read every page of this book and you will pass!" And I did!

    I read the book in 2 weeks. I am a slow reader when studying because I always jot down notes on the side of the book and on sheets of paper.

    By the way, I have heard other classmates warn me to not take the video version of the RICA. Why don't you just take the written RICA instead? From what I heard, the video version is more difficult. Sorry, I do not know anyone who took the video. All those who I know passed the RICA, including me took the written version.

    Don't worry, if you want to be a teacher, nothing will stand to be an obstacle. Besides, think of it this way, the CSET and the RICA are a way to filter out people with low academic skills - do you really want those type to teach America's children?!
     
  4. dangerm0use

    dangerm0use Rookie

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    Jan 9, 2005

    i know ALOT of people who would debate that statement. does a test determine who is or isnt a good instructor?
     
  5. ABCD1234

    ABCD1234 Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2005

    I'm sure MANY people would feel this way, and I do too!! I do agree, a test does not determine who is or isn't a good instructor. BUT! - Wouldn't a fine instructor, one who truly respects education, and is intelligent enough to be a teacher, be able to pass a test?

    Look, the CSET and the RICA are NOT ROCKET SCIENCE EXAMS. They are passable, and quite honestly, I would NOT ALLOW SOMEONE WHO COULDN'T PASS CSET OR RICA TO TEACH CHILDREN. Would you?

    We need the finest teachers to teach our most precious treasure: America's Children. I won't go into politics, but I do firmly beleive that NCLB is meant to serve a good purpose. And one of it is to have HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS. We cannot filter out all inept teachers, but CSET and RICA is designed to prevent low academic teachers from teaching! Period!!

    In my opinion, all teachers should have at least a Master's Degree or beyond. Isn't it our philosophy that education is a life-long process?!!!!! And if it is a continous process - at what time should a teacher be allowed to pass 2 exams? Please, if someone allows these 2 exams to prevent them from teaching, then should they be a teacher at all?

    I know ALOT of people who wouldn't debate these statments.
     
  6. dangerm0use

    dangerm0use Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2005

    so by your argument we can conclude that teachers who have been teaching for 20+ years and cannot pass these tests are not capable of properly instructing our youth? a test does not determine whether or not someone is "highly qualified". all it does is say "this person can pass a test." the tests might seem not so challenging to some of us because we have been/are in school recently, but there are many who have not taken on the role of student in such a long time. i agree that we need individuals who are capable of instilling knowledge into our youths minds, but to solely base our determining factor on whether or not they can pass a test is not a strong enough argument.

    BTW: good luck to those who will be taking the test on Jan.22


     
  7. ABCD1234

    ABCD1234 Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2005

    The CSET tests on everyday academic subjects tuaght in schools. Being in school "recently" as you claim is not a prerequisite to pass this exam. Again, the CSET is a multiple subjects test, and it tests such LOW percentage of what teachers are supposed to KNOW!!!!!!!!

    So you are saying a teacher with 20+ years experience couldn't pass an academic exam that tests them on what they are teaching everyday in the classroom???? :confused:

    And for your information, only new & relatively new (1-3 year) teachers are being required to pass CSET and RICA. Those 20+ years teachers are grandfathered in, and do not need to take it ever. But in my opinion, I would like to think that they could pass it. Wouldn't you?

    Besides, are we not advocating life-long learning? If so, then they shouldn't be out of the school setting too long right? Again, in my opinion, every teacher should have a Masters Degree or beyond. And if they do, surely they can pass the CSET no problem. Then this wouldn't even be a problem for you to argue. :tired:

    Again, I am not saying a test determines what makes a good instructor, and I am not saying a test determines who is highly qualified. But according to NCLB, a highly qualified teacher can pass the CSET & RICA. Are you arguing this? Especially since the CSET can be taken as many times as needed in order to pass!!!

    I am saying that this test will help prevent those who do not have high academic skills from becoming teachers. Would you want someone who couldn't pass Subtest II of the CSET - which is the math, science, chemistry section to teach your child these subjects. Would you?! As for me, not my students!!!!!!!! :eek:
     
  8. dangerm0use

    dangerm0use Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2005

    why does a 1st-5th grade teacher need to learn geometry? of course an instructor needs to know their respective subject matters. but you can draft a test, call whoever passes it "highly qualified", and those who cannot "less qualified." do you have the statistics of the retention rate since the NCLB provision? having a degree does not mean you can pass any test either. but i would guess you meant an MA in Education. none the less, "beating a dead horse with a stick"?
     
  9. ABCD1234

    ABCD1234 Rookie

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    Jan 10, 2005

    Are you purposely trying to make me laugh? A 1st-5th grade teacher doesn't need to know geometry - just because they don't teach it? Hah, HAH! You've got to be kidding. How fundamental is geometry?!!!

    Okay look, you are right "beating a dead horse with a stick", so I'll say this. If we took what you and I said in front of an audience full of our students, their parents, and our university professors and administration. Who do you think would win this argument out?

    Besides, have you passed the CSET & RICA yet? I only ask because you must realize what a tremendously LOW percentage it really tests teachers to know. :eek:

    I'll end this by saying, I have studied hard to be able to pass my exams and be where I am today. With a lot of dedication and my faith in God's support, I do not take for granted my abilities. I only hope to use what I know to be the best teacher that I can be! :love:
     
  10. Andi

    Andi Rookie

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    Feb 26, 2005

    Hi, I am just reading these threads after passing the multiple-subject CSET. I need to take the RICA this April (2005). I thought of the video exam but decided to study and take the written test. Have you taken the test? If so, do you have any info that would help? Thanks
     
  11. JAMIE

    JAMIE Rookie

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    Mar 1, 2005

    imo, i do think the cset multiple subjects is a bit too rediculous for those planning on teaching and really does not apply to the classroom. true one should be familiar with many of the subjects in the cset but they get so fricken specfic on things that children won't ever ask or care to know. i will sell my soul to the first child that i will be teaching who asks me a few of the cset questions that were/are difficult to understand. i would have no problem having my future children have teachers that may not have passed a test like the cset or rica (ok cbest everyone should pass because hell, im a horrible test taker and passed on the first time with no preparation) because heck, i have had PLENTY of my teachers in the past be "highly qualified" and explain things to me well and got me involved in academics who did not take the cset. a test that isn't the most realistic should not be a factor in determining what is a good teacher.
     
  12. chicanabeans

    chicanabeans Rookie

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    Mar 5, 2005

    http://ricahelp.blogspot.com/

    I typed up a quick blog on the RICA and what you need to know for each domain on the test. A lang.arts prof I had back in the credential program typed it up for us as a simple way to review for the RICA and it helped me...Good luck :)
     
  13. specialbacon

    specialbacon Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2005

    My colleague and I took the video portion of the RICA and we both FAILED. We spoke to our college professor and he suggested that we take the multiple choice section. We did and we both PASSED. I do NOT recommend the video because only a very small portion of candidates pass.
     
  14. specialbacon

    specialbacon Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2005

    Yes, I took both parts. I did the video and did not pass. I did the written and PASSED with flying colors. Just study the domains and you will do well. A lot of the questions are very academically related and make sense in the teaching world - unlike the silly CSET plethora of questions.
     
  15. dangerm0use

    dangerm0use Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2005

    are the domains the ones on the RICA website? is there anything else besides those that we should study? or will studying those be enough to pass the written version?
     
  16. Bunnylady

    Bunnylady New Member

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    Apr 8, 2005

    No disrespect intended, but some people have excellent academic skills, but do not test well. I think that was an unfair statement.
     
  17. bonnieluvsvegas

    bonnieluvsvegas Rookie

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    Apr 18, 2005

    Abc123

    in response to your posting and I quote: Wouldn't a fine instructor, one who truly respects education, and is intelligent enough to be a teacher, be able to pass a test?

    Do you apply this same philosophy with your students? "That is, "if you do not pass a test; you are stupid".

    Your comments please.
     
  18. Eki75

    Eki75 Rookie

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    May 25, 2005


    I know this wasn't directed at me, but I wanted to add my two cents. lol.

    OF COURSE NOT! I would never tell a student that they were stupid, period--whether they passed a test or not. Equally, I do not believe that those of us who may not pass a particular test should feel or be called stupid. It's different strokes for different folks.

    Imagine this. A student is struggling with, let's say geometry. You try your best to help him/her, but it's a struggle. They try very hard and work diligently to understand the concepts, but when test time comes around, they fail. Are they stupid? No. Do they understand geometry? Probably not in this situation. Now, when you decided to let a student teach the geometry class as an exercise--and through this exercise, concepts must actually be learned by the whole class--do you pick the student who struggled or do you pick the student who excelled? The answer is clear, at least to me. (It would be a good learning tactic to have the struggling student present a lesson within his/her achievement level, but I digress...)

    SO... when some of us fail our myriad of tests, does that mean we are stupid? Not in my opinion. Does it make sense that California would prefer to hire people who pass these assessments over people who do not to present similar material to our children? It does to me. Sure, there are teacher's editions and one can learn the lesson the night before they are to present it--and that works well enough for some; but, doesn't it make logical sense that someone who really knows the material thoroughly will have more to bring to the academic table in a particular lesson than someone who just learned about it the night before? I think the quality of the lesson and in tern the level of learning by the students receiving the lesson will be greater from the teacher who really knows their material. I mean, no offense to anyone, but honestly some of the grammar I see on this board from people who are now or are aspiring to be teachers is kind of appalling, for example. How can you TEACH grammar if you don't know how to use it well or choose not to use it well yourself?

    This is JMO. For the record, I took the CSET last weekend and do not know if I passed. I do know that I will do what I need to do to pass that test before I start teaching. I want to make sure I know my stuff, and if I truly KNOW and UNDERSTAND my stuff, I should be able to pass these tests without much problem--good test taker or not. ON the CSET, there were definitely BEST answers and usually the other three didn't make sense if you really understood the material in the question. Again, JMO.
     
  19. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Eki75, sorry, but I have to take issue with you on the issue of grammar and postings on this Web site. There are places where Standard English is called for - the CBEST or SAT essay is an obvious example, as is the formal speech or presentation. But there are also circumstances in which full-on Standard English is mildly to moderately the wrong choice. Cheering on the Giants, Dodgers, Angels, or Padres is one: somehow "Judging from that call, the official would benefit from an examination by his oculist" just doesn't have the same ring as "The ump's blind! That was a strike!" I'm happy to allow personal email and chat on forums like this to be non-formal as well - people post in haste, but better they post in haste than not ask or answer at all.

    Having said which, I now need to turn to the issue of geometry and its claimed irrelevance for the first- to fifth-grade teacher.

    According to the state content standards for math (you can download this document from the Web site of the California Department of Education, http://www.cde.gov), by the end of kindergarten, kids are comparing objects as to which is longer, wider, higher, or heavier and identifying and describing triangles, circles, cubes, squares, cones, and the like. By the end of first grade, they're measuring items using non-standard units and sorting common two- and three-dimensional shapes according to attributes such as squareness, roundness, number of corners, size, position, etc. By the end of second grade, they're measuring items to the nearest inch or centimeter and classifying plane and solid objects including spheres, pyramids, and rectangular prisms, and they're breaking complex plane shapes down into simpler ones. By the end of third grade, they're choosing appropriate measurement units, dealing with liquid volume, mass/weight, and length, they're estimating surface area and volume of solid shapes, and they know the attributes of several types of triangle (including isosceles, equilateral, and right), some quadrilaterals (including parallelograms), and regular polygons including octagons, and they're identifying simpler solids in a more complex solid. By the end of fourth grade, they're calculating area and perimeter, using coordinate grids, identifying congruent figures, making models of solids including pyramids from two-dimensional patterns, and identifying and defining all the different types of quadrilateral. By the end of fifth grade they're computing volumes in both customary and metric measure, they're using straightedges and compasses and protractors to measure and draw various angles, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles, and rectangles, and they know the sum of the interior angles of a triangle is 180 degrees.

    That's all geometry, the sort of geometry that's on the CSET.

    And why is this geometry stuff on the CSET, even for people who will never teach fifth grade? Because math as a discipline is additive: it builds on what has been learned before. What's more, it depends on the student's confidence in her ability to use what she's learned to work out an answer even when the going gets tough. Not that that will be news to anyone who has ever sat in a math class and muttered, "Oh, no - I just don't get this any more!" - as nearly everyone on this Web site is sure to have done at least once. (Even me? You betcha.)

    So it seems that in order to help our students not get stuck as we got stuck, we're going to have to do something about our issues with math. That probably sounds like bad news - but it's also good news. First, we're not where we were in third grade or fifth grade or tenth grade: we're grownups, and we can demand and get good explanations instead of being blown off; we can find the good teachers and the worthwhile supplementary materials such as MATH ON CALL or the USBORNE ILLUSTRATED DICTIONARY OF MATH; we can politely but firmly insist that the people teaching us do their job so we understand. Second, as we work on the math issues we ourselves begin to move out of their shadow, and that can be incredibly liberating after all those years of flogging ourselves for being "stupid". Third, we'll be much more effective with our students - we'll know more, we'll be better models of persevering with the material even when stuck, and we'll be more convincing when we say, "Being stuck doesn't mean you're stupid, it just means you're having to work on this one."

    I think California's kids deserve that.
     
  20. Eki75

    Eki75 Rookie

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    May 29, 2005

    There's nothing grammatically wrong with your last two examples! lol.

    I know there's a time and a place for heightened language, but I was referring to people who post "The ump are blinds," or "Those was a strike," etc. Typos are one thing, and we all make them. But I've seen many posts with glaring grammatical errors that are more than mere typos from people claiming to want to be teachers--and that makes me nervous. That's all I am saying. It's a pet peeve of mine, though, and JMO. No biggie. :D
     
  21. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    May 29, 2005

    I hang my head, chastened: can't even manage a decently ungrammatical sentence. Insert here mournful sigh.
     
  22. naomi

    naomi Rookie

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    Jun 12, 2007






    I am reading the Zarillo book....I am curious, you said you read it for 2 weeks.....was that all day, everyday for 2 weeks? Thanks, Naomi
     

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