Rewarding students to behave

Discussion in 'General Education' started by letsteach, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. letsteach

    letsteach Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 1, 2012

    What are your thoughts on rewarding students to behave?

    We are currently experiencing challenging behaviour from quite a few students across the upper primary and secondary school, and in assembly the Chairman of the School Board (who does not have an education background) announced, "Tell us what you want". This was without consultation and teachers were horrified.

    On Friday the first of the prizes was handed out. The certificate says the prize is for academic and good behavior. It is just so crazy. The academic students behave anyway and the ones that do not behave are not academic. So the ones he is trying to entice into good behaviour won't earn the prize anyhow! Also he is leaving at the end of the school year so the next Chairman will inherit a school with students asking, "What's in it for me?".

    Have you ever tried this method of behaviour management and does/could it possibly work? Am I being too negative to start with? It is just going against everything I believe in when it comes to behaviour management.
     
  2.  
  3. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Apr 1, 2012

    We have a Positive Behavior System in place in our school and do try to focus on the positive. (It has been really successful with most of the kids.) It's not blanket rewards, though. They get paw prints for good behavior that go in the hopper. Twenty kids (of our 480 - 500 kids) get pulled each week and get to wear jeans. I do give rewards in my room. Kids who have maintained a 100 in behavior get a treat and a paw print. Those who have maintained an A (no more than 2 behavior grades lost for the week) get a treat. Each six weeks, students who have maintained an A every week in behavior get a "treat" from the school. (Free dress day, get to wear hats, extra recess time, etc) We also do a "Big Paw" celebration for those who have maintained an A every week for 2 weeks. These are usually bigger. Our last one had them taking their lunch outside for a picnic and then 30 minutes of free play. We've done a play day in the gym where they can play on the rock wall, dance, get their faces painted (by high school volunteers), etc. I know it sounds like a lot all in one writing, but for the school it's only at the end of the six-weeks. For our elementary kids,these work well.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,959
    Likes Received:
    1,148

    Apr 1, 2012

    I don't think kids should be rewarded for academic results, other than what they are already getting (intrinsic reward and the actual good grade)
    For behavior, it is a good idea. We always think about all the negative consequences, and forget that some reward would do so much. (mostly because we don't think they deserve anything at that point).

    I think the crucial part is to balance the reward. Not give too much, because they take it for granted, and then want more. Not give it easily, because then it loses its effectiveness. Not give it too hard, or give too little, because they won't be successful and the whole thing falls apart.

    I'm a fan of small rewards, they really do work.
     
  5. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,934
    Likes Received:
    257

    Apr 2, 2012

    I have no problem with such a reward system. I don't see how it is any different from those teachers who let students have a say in the classroom rules. Now, admittedly, I find that practice rather silly but if it works for someone so be it.

    The idea that it won't affect the behavior of kids who aren't achieving already simply isn't true. I'm amazed what a new reward option can get my kids, all my kids, to do. I do a class management game with my 7th graders that results in a class reward roughly every 6 weeks. A few weeks ago I started offering 1 point for each student who greeted me nicely at the door. I went from a couple per period to nearly all of them, even those I never would have expected to play along. When I stopped offering the points most of them kept doing it anyway.
     
  6. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 2, 2012

    I think positive behavior should only be rewarded if it goes above and beyond normal expectations.
     
  7. bondo

    bondo Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2010
    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 2, 2012

    I go back and forth on this. It seems to only reward kids who already behave well. Plus, as silverspoon alluded too, kids should not be rewarded for behaving normally. There has to be standards and expectations that are considered normal and necessary and expected.
     
  8. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Apr 2, 2012

    I think the main problem with this system is that it was administered on a whim by someone not part of the educational program at the school, so it was given very little professional thought. I think rewards can - and often are - an integral part of many schoolwide behavior management systems, but not in the way you are describing.
     
  9. myKroom

    myKroom Habitué

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    835
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 2, 2012

    :yeahthat:

    We also do PBIS, but I have a hard time with the fact that we reward behaviors that are typical everyday expectations! If I ask you to sit on the carpet, then you should do it without a reward!!! Handing out tickets to those who do it (which are the ones that normally do it) doesn't really help anything. My behavior kids still act out with or without the reward. I could go on, but this topic really gets under my skin! It's best if I stop now!!!
     
  10. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Apr 2, 2012

    I know all schools do PBiS differently, but as a former good kid....I like it. I never got recognized for my good behavior (which I didn't expect, but I was very aware that the kids who got the attention were the trouble-makers). I don't argue with kids in my room, and I do everything humanly possible to not give attention to their behavior. So I'll sing the praises of the good kids to the rafters. It's not a perfect system. Sometimes the kids who get pulled for jeans are not the good kids. They are kids who got their name in the hopper on a fluke. That said, over all it's still a good system. There's never going to be a perfect solution to kids' behaviors. What works in one setting won't work in another.
     
  11. TeachOn

    TeachOn Habitué

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    804
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 3, 2012

    If a student prone to misbehavior behaves for a couple of days (whether as a result of something I have said to him or not), I thank him. It throws 'em for a beneficial little loop.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. TheMathLemur,
  2. KSMathMom
Total: 166 (members: 2, guests: 141, robots: 23)
test