Reward system

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by lovinteach, Jul 5, 2005.

  1. lovinteach

    lovinteach Rookie

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    Hi all!! I hope summer is going great for everyone!! I have been trying to think of ways to change things for the upcoming school year. I teach 5th grade and I am trying to think of a reward system for good behavior and completing homework. In the past I did "Funny Bucks". If the student behaved that day (no name on the board) then they would receive a funny buck. If the student completed all homework they would receive a funny buck. They could then use the Funny Bucks to buy things - homework pass, extra recess etc. I am getting kind of tired of this and want to try something new. I was thinking of a monthly reward chart. If the student completes homework they will get a sticker and the same for behavior. At the end of the month if the student has so many stickers they will be able to participate in a special activity - extra recess, movie, etc. I don't know if this may be too juvenile for 5th grade.

    I want something that is easy and does not take too much time. Any suggestions are welcome!! Thank you in advance for your help!!
     
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  3. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    gumball rewards....Petunia

    a gumball from the gumball machine. Get gumballs and gumball machine at the Dollar Store cheap. Also you can buy bubble gum in a bucket that kids love. I have great luck with the bubble gum machine. Maybe use one the first half of the year and the other the last for variety. Or mix it up with a piece of wrapped candy from the candy jar. Or one day it might be a big candy bar ---don't tell them ahead of time. Just some thoughts for you to ponder. Or get bubble gum after they earn so many stickers. Or for multiplication tables we work on a banana split. Maybe later in the year go by weeks or months and earn parts of the banana split. Here is how we do multiplication banana split....Mad Minutes ---We start them at the beginning of the third grade. Addition, next subtraction and when we start multiplication we don't give any more add and sub Mad Minutes. Students must get 20 correct in one minute. This makes students stop counting on their fingers, using point math and number lines. If they get 20 correct they get a piece of candy from the candy jar. (a small piece of individual wrapped candy) They like those fruit square things You get a package of them and put in
    a pretty jar with a lid. Can't think of the name of them. We use
    flashcard drills. Sort out the 0s and they must get them all correct in 40 seconds. And they get a piece of candy. Than we do the 1s in 40 seconds and earn a piece of candy. Oh, yes they are easy, but they had success and you have their attention and you are building self esteem. After we go thru all the flashcards including 10s. We go to the Mad Minutes. Get gumball machine and gumballs at the Dollar Store cheap. If they improve by 3 they get another gumball We do a five minute timing on one hundred facts at the beginning of the year and at the end of each grading period. These are test and stay in their personal file folders in the teachers file cabinet. Now when we start multiplication facts. We do the flashcard thing except this time we work of a banana split party. 0s=napkin, 1s=spoon, 2s=dish, 3s=banana 4s= ice cream 5s=toppings chocolate, strawberry and butterscotch, 6s= crushed Oreo cookies 7s=whipped topping 8s= sprinkles 9s=a cherry on top. 10s
    = nuts.... Get at Dollar Store also cheap. They earn a certificate at the end of year assembly with the number of facts they mastered in one minute in each addition, multiplication and subtraction. Hope you can understand all this. You can buy a whole book of lots of sheets of Mad Minutes. You can buy a program of Times Tables the Fun Way. Longer stories, posters and etc.
     
  4. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    This is an interesting discussion. The "reward system" is one I fully understand and yet it just doesn't sit well with me. As a parent, I do not want my kids rewarded for "expected behavior" - so, if my child were to do a wonderful job on Mad Minute I would not want them to get a "prize" for it. Same with good behavior. I want my (own) children to feel pride and the intrinsic value of such behaviors.

    However, when I started teaching (like 18 years ago), I noticed that the first thing my 6th graders asked when I explained my homework policies and shared my classroom rules was, "What do we get??" They expected candy, stickers, free time, etc. for doing ANYthing. It was really annoying.

    Is there any way around this (maybe I should have started a discussion thread on this particular topic instead)?
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    TxS- I think in the behavior mgt forum you'd find this discussion- probably in archives. Yes- there is the thought that 'rewards' do foster 'sticker junkies', what's in it for me kind of mentality. But don't we all get rewards for 'expected behaviors'? A bonus in our salary, a good observation review, pats on the back in our jobs, lower car insurance for safe driving, etc. I used to use this kind of system in kindergarten but don't now in 2nd or when I taught 3rd. I do use a lotof proacitve, community buidling, expecting respect for each other kinds of things and that does curtail most behavior problems. I don't personally like the 'name on the board' behaior mgt system either though- I think it's too embarassing, breaks student/teacher trust so I don't use it buthave colleagues who do and swear by it. Just like parenting, a teacher has to find what works for him/her and the kids they teach.
     
  6. hanvan

    hanvan Connoisseur

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    I teach first graders and I used a similar system. I bought a big thing of tickets. When I caught them doing anything right (being kind, turning something in, following the rules-anything) I let them get one ticket. When their tickets built up I let them choose something out of the prize box. If they were doing something really BAD they owed me a ticket. It worked really well.
    Also we do class rewards. I would write the reward on the board "NO SHOES DAY" and every time we got a class reward "oh your class was so good during library" I would cross out one letter. Then we got the reward.
    You could also do a class reward and write in on a piece of paper and foldit into an envelope so they can;t see it. Hang it on the board and after 10 compliments they recieve the reward. I did this with a popcorn party. The kids loved the surprise.
     
  7. Kat Longoria

    Kat Longoria Rookie

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    I like the "Funny Bucks" idea, but I know when I would do checkbooks with my kids - basically the same concept - it got to be a pain. SO- I've decided that my "Caught Doing the Right Thing" book is better for me to manage, hassle free. I have this colorful lil' notebook and they all know that when I whip it out, I'm looking for those who are "caught doing the right thing" at any given moment, for any reason, i.e. homework, behavior, walking to and from places, etc. Rewards usually are more recess time, first to go to lunch (which is a huge deal apparently), brag to parents... I can't do any candy or food of any sort per state law..bummer! I know it's not much, but the kids really want to get their name written in my book. It's so funny how so little can do so much sometimes!
     
  8. hojalata

    hojalata Comrade

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    A great book on the subject of rewarding students is Punished by Rewards by Alphie Kohn. It's great, I'd highly suggest it.
     
  9. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    I, too, go back and forth on whether to reward or not reward. It is a hard issue with much merit on both sides. One area I do use a reward system in is in the area of homework. We SO struggle with getting quality work in on time, and each year it seems to become a bigger issue! For several years, I have used Homeworkopoly which can be found at:http://www.teachnet.com/homeworkopoly/

    It has worked well to help keep those students who are border-line from falling into the late work habit, and best of all, for me, it is a way to give those students who always do their best a well-deserved pat on the back. Unfortunately, there are still those couple students for whom late work is a daily issue. :tired:

    In Homeworkopoly, it is easy to plug in lots of non-material rewards. For example: make a bulletin board, eat lunch with the teacher, sharpen your pencil whenever you want, read a story to the class or a younger student, present your hobby to the class, do half an assignment, etc. My favorite is when I get to call a parent to tell them just how wonderful their child is! It is so neat to hear the initial apprehension in their voices turn to appreciation and pride. :) For the prizes they receive when they pass 'GO', I use a smiley theme. I purchase items from Oriental Trading Co., starting out with something small like a sticker and then each suceeding time they go around, the prize gets a little better. But, these could also be non-material prizes, too, just as easily.

    I have done it where we roll each day, and also, when I just pick random days. In order to 'roll', they must meet certain requirements: quality work, work on time, papers headed correctly, planners filled out by 8:30, etc. (Basically, whatever your standards are for a responsible student.) Anyway, it does work well, and the kids really love it! :)
     
  10. canada friend

    canada friend Rookie

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    I do a store in my classroom where the students can "buy" items in the store on fridays with their "Eden dollars". The items from the store are donated toys, dollar store items, etc. from parents. I also have a friend that had a cardboard canoe in her room and the students would get pieces of paper to write their name on when they've done homework, etc. They would throw those papers into the canoe and she would pick 5 names on fri. to receive a reward. This was for Gr.8 and they loved it!
     
  11. Sthang6

    Sthang6 Rookie

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    Something I use we call " Decorations" Each month the children get a sheet to color and it gets hung up on the bulletin board. For thier behavior and 100's and doing thier homework they get decorations. The decorations are small pictures that I photocoppied. The color, cut them out, and glue them on thier sheet. Usually there is a monthly theme. EX. Sept. is Apples and Oct. is Halloween. Then at the end of each month I count them. The 2/3 children who has the most gets to choose a prize out of our classroom store. The prizes can be anything. The dollar store is a great resource so are the scholastic sales. The children love this. Hope this helps.
    Sarah
     
  12. pamms

    pamms Comrade

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    community building?

    I agree with you that life is full of rewards for 'expected behavior'. I am expected to show up for work and I am rewarded with a paycheck (no matter how small it may seem ;-) )...I guess we all just have to find the balance we are comfortable with. This last year I started rewarding those kids who never got 'in trouble' by letting eat lunch with me in the classroom and watch a video at the end of the month. I just started feeling like those who were simply behaving as they ought to be were sometimes getting overlooked. ANYWAY....I'd like to learn more about the 'community building' that you mentioned. This is something I believe in, but I don't think I have a handle on how to best create the classroom community feeling that I'd like to achieve. Have you posted more about this somewhere?

    Thanks!
    Pam
     
  13. canada friend

    canada friend Rookie

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    I also do a puzzle reward system with my kids. I have a picture from an old calendar covered with bristol board puzzle pieces. The kids have a reward for getting all the puzzle pieces off for example: extra recess time, movie, donuts, etc. But they also know the puzzle pieces can go back on. If they are noisy or off task I just walk up and put a piece on and they quiet down each other. I've done it for grades K-3 and it works well.
     
  14. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Thoughts on community building:
    I strive everyday to create a climate in my classroom that supports learners in their explorations, builds feelings of belonging and significance, and sends a message that I believe in my students. The thought that we are a TEAM is reinforced through class discussions, partnerships and cooperative learning experiences. Creating a classroom community in which students are empowered to make choices and feel safe to take chances is important to me as an educator. Choice can be simply where to sit, what to read, what to study, with whom to work- or more complex choices can include choices about personal behavior or choices about what we will focus our studies on as a class.
    Working on the home-school connection also fosters a strong community in the classroom. Within the first two weeks of school, I use my prep periods to make a personal phone call home to each student’s parents. During this phone call I express how happy I am to have the parent’s child in my class and share some positive anecdote of the child’s second grade experience thus far.
    In my class, students helped create the rules/code of conduct. They feel more connected to the rules and feel a sense of ownership of them. In managing behaviors I find that focusing on successes builds a child’s confidence and feelings of capability. Allowing for choice within parameters build’s children’s feelings of responsibility and give them a “sense of control" of themselves. We use the word RESPECT often.
    As a teacher and parent, I am most effective in redirecting misbehavior when I remember the child is looking for belonging and significance. When I use encouragement, I build a stronger relationship with a child and boost his feeling of being capable, connected, and contributing. Letting children know that you understand their feelings and respect their points of view is one of the most encouraging experiences adults can provide. Winning cooperation through mutual respect and shared responsibility helps build children’s self-confidence, responsibility, and self-discipline.
    I guess what this all boils down to is ATTITUDE- mine and the kids'! Being an enthusiastic teacher, bringing out the enthusiasm and wonder in kids through our daily activities and interactions, and fostering that 'WE'RE IN THIS TOGETHER' mentality build classroom community.
    I know this was long....but obviously I feel passionately about how the climate I create makes a difference in how learning occurs and most important how kids feel about themselves as learners!! :rolleyes:
     
  15. Robintz

    Robintz Rookie

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    rewards

    Another book I would recommend is "Discipline without Stress, Punishments or Rewards: How Teachers and Parents Promote Responsibility & Learning" by Dr. Marvin Marshall. I am reading it this summer and it is fascinating. Matches my philosophy but finally someone is also giving the tools that I need to make it work in my classroom. I do not like reward systems, but have used them because I've had a hard time figuring out other options.

    There is an email group through yahoo specifically for people using the book and it's a great resource and source of support.

    Robin :)
     
  16. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    czacza - You expressed exactly my feelings about the culture of the classroom. Keeping it warm, positive, nourishing, stable, and consistent goes a long way. Even though my kids are upper elementary, I never fail to do the morning routine consistently. It is so important. You are right, it is the attitude that the individuals and the group is very important, that we belong together and are meant to work hard together. They know they are important to me and their behavior reflects that. I have small classes and don't need a reward system. I use rewards just to celebrate our being together. I approach our reading time that way, too, and it brings us closer. The highlight of the end of the year was when we had a school sleepover and every child attended and every parent was thrilled. I feel so strongly about all of this that I have a hard time taking a day off!
     
  17. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    upsadaisy-
    Isn't it funny how a little proactive community building makes such a big difference? One of my colleagues always comments on how I have a 'good class', funny how other teachers seem to get the 'bad class'- I think the climate has so much to do with it!! So glad to hear from other like-minded educators like yourself!! :)
     
  18. hojalata

    hojalata Comrade

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    Robin,
    How does the book Discipline without Stress, Punishments or Rewards compare to the ideas on Love and Logic? It seems like they might both be aiming for the same end result, just wondering how this book promotes getting their compared to Love and Logic. Could you incorporate these two ideas together? Thanks,
    Heather
     
  19. Robintz

    Robintz Rookie

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    Marshall vs. Love and Logic

    I haven't taken a Love and Logic class in a few years and can't find the book, so what I'm going to say is probably not going to be 100% accurate. That being said, however, my understanding would be that Love and Logic is still a bit more "coercive" (according to Marshall) than he prefers.

    I'll use an example from the book. He says that acknowledgements encourage and motivate, but praise has a price. It implies a lack of acceptance and worth when the youth does not behave as the adult wishes. Using a phrase such as..."I like..." encourages a young person to behave in order to please the adult. By contrast, acknowledgement simply affirms and fosters self-satisfaction. Compare "I like the way you are working" with "Your working shows good effort." Which one will lead to internal self-satisfaction?

    Comments such as "I like how Josh is working" (in the author's opinion) actually punish because the other children see the attempt to manipulate behavior (you are really trying to get other kids to do what he's doing), plus the other kids get irritated with Josh, so he may be embarrassed by the public attention which is a punishment for him.

    He is very big on having the children help come up with consequences for their own misbehaviors, which I don't believe Love and Logic necessarily does. My son's kindergarten teacher used L&L and was constantly saying things like, "you owe me x because you were hassling me so now you owe me hassle time..." which is a very top-down system compared to Marshall's.

    I'm really just getting to understand this a little bit, so I guess I'd recommend checking out the yahoo groups or the websites to learn more about the program. I know there is lots of information out there.

    Robin :rolleyes:
     
  20. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    czacza - I think it makes all the difference in the world. It is my best motivator, I believe. It is rare that a child doesn't feel it or welcome it, though that has happened. I have an advantage in that my classes are always small, which makes it easier to foster. Don't you think that it just breaks down the wall between the teacher and the students? Not in a 'friends' way but .... it's hard to explain. I have the highest expectations of any of our elementary teachers, grade the toughest, too, but have the strongest feeling of community in my class, I think. I don't do as well with my middle school math class and I should work on that.


    That book about discipline without stress sounds great. Think I'll look for it online. :thanks:
     
  21. TXTeacher4

    TXTeacher4 Companion

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    CzaCza- Do you use Tribes?
     
  22. marselyn

    marselyn New Member

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    I find it really tough to be consistent when strictly using a reward system. Other teachers at the school I teach at do all sorts of. . . bean store, ticket rewards . . . I know my style and it's too much for me. I also feel like one teacher "txsandmom" and do not want to give constant prizes, candy, and all these other things that seem, well, out of place in the classroom. So, I did devise a plan that is meant for 2nd graders, but I feel could be slightly modified for older students. It combines consequences with rewards. If you are interested, it is posted on jaszmyn's discussion- go to the discussion entitled: class rules- help! You can get there on the home page.
    Everyone really has great ideas.
    Good luck.
     
  23. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    czacza and upsadaisy,
    I've been struggling with wanting to change my behavior system as well. I like the way that both of you build a strong sense of community within your classrooms. I have a couple of questions...when a child misbehaves such as calling someone else a name ( I had a student who loved to call people fag or lesbian this year), what do you do about this? Do you think that holding a classroom meeting and discussing it as a community would solve a problem like this or do you just ignore the bad behaviors and focus on only the good? I'm really struggling with how to create an environment where we don't have problems. My first two years of teaching went well and we had few problems, however, last year I was a wit's end trying to deal with all of the problems going on.
     
  24. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Andrea, again let me say that my small school atmosphere gives me an advantage. It is a big deal if someone says shut up. However, when anything disrespectful happens I don't ignore it. I speak with the individuals involved very openly. They don't like to be put on the spot. I don't drop it until they recognize their behavior and the effect it had on the other(s). That is the most important thing, that a child have empathy for another, at least to some degree. If a child is not open to this intervention, I will conference with him/her and our assistant head of school. It will involves letters of restitution. She is a master at this and a great resource.
     
  25. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    Thanks, everyone, for this wonderful thread. Blessed are the students who are in your care! :angel: Ran across this neat quote several years ago, and thought it might apply to the discussion here...?? :)

    "I've come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It's my personal approach that creates the climate. It's my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child will be humanized or de-humanized." - By Haim Ginott
     
  26. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    That is an awe-inspiring quotation. Our principal handed it out to us a couple of years ago and it affected me a great deal. It is so true.
     
  27. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    That quote is amazing and should be given to every teacher. I love it!
     
  28. j9saylor

    j9saylor Rookie

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    I agree that is a great quote and it is so true. The kids in your class follow your mood and what you model.
    Upsadaisy- I am moving to a small school next year (4 teachers per grade) from a big school (21 teachers in 3rd grade). I am hoping the move to a small school will be an advantage in many areas.
     
  29. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    4 teachers per grade sounds big to me! You will probably love it.
     
  30. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    I teach in a school with ONE teacher per grade level; now, that is a small school! :D :sorry: Couldn't resist!! That is one reason this forum is so extremely valuable to me!!

    TWENTY-ONE third grade teachers-that just blows me away?!! :)
     
  31. Margo

    Margo Devotee

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    I used to teach in a school that also had just one teacher per grade. Then I moved states and went to a school that had 13 teachers per grade. Talk about culture shock. :eek:
     
  32. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    That would be a culture schock for me, as well! :) I am thinking that four sections of a grade level would be great! Two classes could buddy-up or maybe the classes could even departmentalize. Best of all would be having three other teachers to share ideas and support with! 'Course I am sure that it would also take a special effort to work together as a team. Another facet of that awesome community building that everyone was speaking so eloquently about. :)
     
  33. pamms

    pamms Comrade

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    It's so true


    I can always see and feel the difference on those days that I may not be quite 'on my game' and then I can usually catch myself letting that happen and make a quick change! The teacher really does set the tone. Did you really have 21 teachers (21 classes?) of third grades in your school? We will have 8 teachers in 2nd this year (approx. 1100 students in k-6).
    Pam
     
  34. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    All I can say is WOW. I never even imagined that other schools had more than four teachers in a single grade. That is when our district looks at building a new school. I just can't even imagine. How many music teachers, p.e. teachers, and librarians does a school that big have. Wow.
     
  35. j9saylor

    j9saylor Rookie

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    There are 2 music, 2 art, 3 PE, 2 librarians- But we work on a six day cycle to get everything in. We were the only school in the district with third grade though. Next year everything changes though- we had about 600 kids for just third grade. It should be interesting to see what a small school will be like. The one good thing is I'm friends with 2 of the teachers that I'm moving with. The did not decide on the third teacher yet.
     
  36. divey

    divey Companion

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    Rewards

    I have never been a big fan of using those incentive charts, until I used one this year to chart my student's homework. I just put a sticker under their name beside the homework assignment they brought back, and at the end of each quarter, those that returned each homework got a pass for a free book from our book order club. I teach 2nd grade, but am sure that 5th graders would love a free book as well!
     
  37. hojalata

    hojalata Comrade

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    Robin,
    How funny, it actually sounds like they might be more alike than different! Especially if people do Love and Logic correctly! Love and Logic actually focuses on handing the problem back to the student and having them solve it themselves. Part of this can possibly be coming up with their own consequence. For example, instead of TELLING your class what might happen if they talk during a test, you might say, "And guys...what do you think might happen if you choose to talk during the test?" (class says some ideas...) Teacher: "Great, I'll be sure to choose one of those if I come across that situation."
    Another similarity that struck me is that you're not supposed to use the phrase "I like how.." One of the Love and Logic strategies is forming a relationship with the student by "noticing" things about him or her. For example, you'd go up to him a few times a week and say things like "I noticed you like to wear tennis shoes." or "I noticed you like to draw dragons." Jim Fay says it will completely backfire if you say "I noticed you like to draw dragons. I like that" because then the student's talk inside his head can be negative "he's just saying that.." or "yeah but i'm not that good at them."
    I LOVE the idea of NOT saying "I like how Josh is working..." This has always just seemed so wrong to me, even if I wasn't sure why. Another great book that touches on this topic is called Teacher Talk: What is Really Means by Chick Moorman. It has a bunch of these phrases, and it tells you why they're really negative statements. Anyway, it sounds like an excellent book.... a mix between the ideas of Love and Logic and Alphie Kohn's (Punished by Rewards..) I'm going to look for it at the library ASAP. Thanks you! Heather
     
  38. jeanie

    jeanie Companion

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    Jul 11, 2005

    I agree with all of the ideas to build a community in the classroom, with an atmosphere that promotes self-respect and natural consequences. I feel that way because I want the students to know how to behave always... whether I am there to notice or not. I want them to personally feel in charge of their decisions to behave or not behave, and in their abilities to learn on their own and to excell. I have struggled in schools where there is a set discipline program to give checks for inappropriate behavior. (One check was a warning, two checks time out, three to the office, four detention, five supension) It felt negative, depressing and unnecessary. I do not want to control the kids, I want them to learn how to control themselves. I know this is a process and I know it takes time. Usually it works, and the kids are absolutely awesome within the first month two. But I have run into a problem about once every 4 or 5 years that totally frustrates me. My problem, it seems, is when I have more than two or three emotionally needy students in my class. Their misbehavior is both supported and mimicked by the others, until it seems to me that they actually misbehave to get more attention from me (and it works, because I certainly can not ignore the behaviour). The classroom "personality" definitely factors into this. In theory, no problem: I simply give them support, encouragement and attention, lots of it, before there is any misbehavior. I discuss problems openly with the class if there is something all can learn, I discuss privately any infractions that I feel are related to the student only. I help them identify more appropriate ways to solve problems or ask for attention.
    In reality: While I am giving this attention to one or two, I may have another one or two who are misbehaving. I stop to deal with that and the first one or two are apt to begin misbehaving because they see how much attention I am giving to the others. Isolation of the involved parties is quite effective usually... but this bouncing back and forth to solve one problem only to have it mimicked elsewhere becomes frustrating! And at the end of the day, I feel like I didnt give much attention to the kids who were behaving. My only consolation is that these kids still seem to like to come to school and I continue to model, model, model respect day after day. So they see it and it may affect them in ways I cannot know. I do usually end up with a special behavior plan for these students that involves the parents (who sometimes don't give a hoot) But I wonder if the extrinsically controlled classrooms may have better success with these characters. Any thoughts?
     
  39. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jul 11, 2005

    I don't know what TRIBES is? Never heard of? Is it a book/philosophy?
     
  40. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jul 11, 2005

    jeanie, the extrinsic motivation method is one aimed at a lower level of behavior, for less mature kids. In that sense, yes, it may be more successful for those few who can't self-monitor well enough. I have used it quietly with select students. They started out with chips and had to turn one in when they weren't on task or whatever. At the end of the day if they had any, they chose a prize. Then we moved it to a week. It didn't disrupt the rest of the class because I simply went to the student and quietly said 'You owe me a token.' This seemed to remind them of the rules effectively without having to make a big deal out of it. This was especially true for impulsive kids. The other kids didn't pay much attention to the system, which was great. I hate a behavior plan that takes time away from teaching.
     
  41. TXTeacher4

    TXTeacher4 Companion

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    Jul 11, 2005

    TRIBES is a method of developing a trusting, open, non-threatening environment. I just went to a 3 day workshop and actually had a great time. A lot of what you are saying sounds like what they are all about. This website probably explains it a little more www.tribes.com.

    When I saw your post I just had to ask!
     

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