Reward Students, Parents Pay!?!

Discussion in 'General Education' started by dolphinswim, Feb 20, 2008.

  1. dolphinswim

    dolphinswim Companion

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    Feb 20, 2008

    Okay...I am a teacher and a parent. Since when did a "Reward" at school come from me in the form of money sent to school? I am so tired of these "rewards" that I am paying for!

    My kids read so many AR books...they get a reward to the local eatery but I have to supply the money...my kids do good in a certain class(I guess they behave and don't stress out the teacher) and they get a "reward" and get pizza for lunch on Friday...I have to send $2.00 by Thursday! For being on the A/B honor roll they get a ice cream party...I have to send in the toppings! The teacher looks good by offering the reward but I am paying for it!

    How is any of this a reward?

    Here is my note back to my children's school:

    Dear Teachers, I have decided to "reward" my children for getting up every morning without my yelling at them, brushing their teeth, eating their breakfast if they choose to and catching the bus every morning since school started! I also am rewarding them for going to school every day and never complaining. For their reward I think a trip to Disney World is sufficient and would like for each of my daughter's 7 teachers, Vice-Principal, Principal, Secretary, Lunch Lady, Bus Driver and anyone else that my daughter comes in contact with to send $100.00 by Friday so I may book their "Reward" online before it is too late! I find it a privlidge to have given birth to and raising my children and think they really deserve this reward! Thank you for your agreement, your understanding and most of all your contribution to their "Reward".

    Sincerely, A teacher who "rewards" her class with out asking for money from their parents!

    ***Please keep in mind this is all in fun, I am really not mad just a bit miffed...and YES I will send in $2.00 so my daughter can enjoy her "reward" that her teacher so graciously decided to give her!

    Honestly, am I crazy or are "rewards" that I pay for to make the teacher look good just tacky?
     
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  3. jw13

    jw13 Groupie

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    Feb 20, 2008

    That is the craziest thing I ever heard of. When I had a special treat for the kids, like popsicles, it came out of my pocket. Or for special things, we would approach the PTA(isn't that what they are for?). But, I have never heard of a class reward funded by parent's. Or of so many rewards. I mean hey we all work for a reward $, but not everything gets a reward. I don't think anyone has thanked me yet for changing there diaper:D
     
  4. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Feb 20, 2008

    I seriously doubt the teacher rewards her students to make herself look good - I think the purpose is to make the kids feel good. Why should SHE pay for it? I think its a nice idea if everyone chips in a little so they can celebrate and the teacher doesn't have to dip into her pocketbook ONCE AGAIN to pay for it. You might reward your own kids at home but some kids don't ever get recognition for what they do at home, so I think its reasonable to ask the parents to help chip in.
     
  5. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Feb 20, 2008

    Some schools, like mine, MANDATE that we reward students for certain things (such as bringing back signed behavior forms) that don't really warrant rewards. (Since when do I get rewarded for being responsible?) As a result, I, the teacher, must come up with stuff, out of my pocket, to comply with school rules because the school does not supply these rewards. Not to mention how teachers supply their classrooms with the basic learning supplies so learning can occur. The expenses add up. I see nothing wrong with asking parents to contribute occassionally, to reward their children--it shows them that both the teacher and the parent are supporting their success. Personally, I can't afford pizza or ice cream parties, so I don't offer them.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Feb 20, 2008

    Can the room mothers arrange for these celebrations? That way not every parent is hit up every time...

    Does the whole school do these pay to play celebrations? If it's only this teacher you have several choices: say something to the teacher about your concerns, refrain from participating, say nothing and suck it up for the remainder of the year...

    I agree it's ridiculous to call these rewards... a sticker would be good!
     
  7. eduk8r

    eduk8r Enthusiast

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    Feb 20, 2008

    Dolphinswim, this sounds like a good racket to me. Thanks for the idea, I never thought of charging parents for the rewards I put in place... hmmm, maybe I can even make a profit...hehehe :lol: Seriously, maybe the teacher should put in place rewards she can afford to give herself? We all have our own rewards for our kids at home and what you're talking about is like a tax or something. I'd say, "No, thanks. We'll handle it from here." :D
     
  8. dolphinswim

    dolphinswim Companion

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    Feb 20, 2008

    My Idea of a Reward!

    I would love to see students "rewarded" in a way that is beneficial to everyone. Read all your AR books...get a certain amount of time free in the library, class doing great making the teacher happy...popcorn party (popcorn and a movie 5.00 total if that much!) Have a free class day where children bring some snacks from home. I just really think rewards should be easy, cost free and meaningful to the children. By the way, these are 8th and 10th graders I am talking about! I just don't think rewards need to be up to 10.00 out of my pocket a time! When they go to the eatery that is what it costs me.

    I am all for the stickers and picture card bingo as rewards! That is what my 5 year olds like! :lol: I have never asked parents to pay for a reward for the class...but then again I teach pre-k and they are easy to please! I am just feeling a need to rant because I am being hit up for money by my kids...
     
  9. rogue0208

    rogue0208 Companion

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    Feb 20, 2008

    What happens if a parent can't afford to pay for the reward? Does the child not get rewarded, even though they deserve it? I agree that teachers certainly pay for a lot of things and that it makes sense for a parent to chip in once in awhile (especially the big huge ones, like a pizza party), but making a parent pay for all the rewards? That's a little ridiculous.
     
  10. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Feb 20, 2008

    That was my first thought as well. It would never occur to me to request parents to pay for a reward. If I choose to reward students in that way, then I choose to foot the bill - that's why my favorite reward is an extra recess ... the kids love it, and it costs me nothing! I feel like I'm asking parents to pay for things (field trips, school fundraisers, etc) often enough.
     
  11. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Feb 20, 2008

    I can see requesting the parent to pay for a fieldtrip even if it is couched as a reward. I can see doing it a time or two especially if it is couched as a seasonal party or something. If it is all the time and very OBVIOUSLY a reward such as with behavior then I think the teacher should deal with that.

    If she were smart and really wanted to be given money for this willingly then she should be planning these "rewards" as curriculum standard activities. For example, my son went on a geology hiking trip as their reward for doing well on the standardized testing (or rather working towards it and taking it seriously). I thought that was a GREAT idea and it had curriculum implications. The kids thought it was basically a reward.

    Even though I know that teachers have to take things out of their pockets too often and that I should be grateful to have a free education in this country, I STILL get a little wierd about it sometimes knowing I was paying $400/MONTH for property taxes and then seeing it in action like this. I still ticks me off. That's not the teacher's fault but she should be aware that she should not be asking for parent's money too lightly or the goodwill will rub off.

    As for my own teacher that I am an aide for, I had to caution her of this perspective at the beginning of the year and to try to pick fieldtrips that cost less but achieves the same objective.
     
  12. kburen

    kburen Cohort

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    Feb 21, 2008

    I have never asked for parents to pay for rewards that I give. The only thing that you could consider a "reward" that I have ever asked for money for, has been the class parties. If I offer the kids an extra reward, I pay for it out of my pocket.
     
  13. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    Feb 21, 2008

    The only thing I ever required a family to pay for was the ticket to the Broadway musical at the dinner theatre I took my 8th graders to every spring. But then, y'all need to remember that I'm the teacher who thinks community supplies are Satanic.

    Yay, individual supplies-with-monograms-that-are-kept-in-the-students'- OWN DESKS, and never touched by anybody else!

    The dinner theatre gave us a mind-boggling discount, too. And an amazing "welcome" once we got there.

    Two buses crammed three-in-a-seat with 8th graders who were dressed to the hilt for their "formal theatre experience." Oh, and the bus drivers got in free. It was the most glorious day for the 8th graders AND for me.

    But everything else I "rewarded" my kids with? I paid for it myself, or got it for freebies from Scholastic. Unless you hand the rewards out like mad to every kid who remembers to bring a pencil, it shouldn't really be that much! Save the rewards for the kids who truly earned them.
     
  14. dolphinswim

    dolphinswim Companion

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    Feb 21, 2008

    wow Mamacita, that would be an awsome experience!

    Now my kids do go to art museums and science exibits that I do not have any problem paying for. My one daughter is in band and I pay tons to let her go places that I feel are beneficial to her talent. I went to Memphis with her so she could play in the half time show at a Bowl Game! I love things like that...
     
  15. TampaTeacher

    TampaTeacher Comrade

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    Feb 21, 2008

    Yeah, I can see how that could be annoying, but you can tell the teachers at your school have good intentions. A friendly note reminding them that all the $2 parties are really adding up might work wonders.

    Sometimes, I get miffed at how much money I shell out for classroom supplies. I always love it when I'm buying rewards, notebook paper, pencils, markers, etc. and somebody says, "You teachers have to pay for that stuff out of your own pockets, don't you?"

    There are always other people in line behind me who gasp and say, "I didn't know that! With all the taxes we pay, teachers still have to buy their own supplies?!"

    I wouldn't dream of sending a bill home to my students' parents! However, we do send notes home asking parents to contribute food to potluck events. Nobody seems to mind that, so far.
     

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