Retaining in Kindergarten?!?!?

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by nickash09, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Apr 7, 2005

    HELP!!!

    I am not a teacher but am a very confused parent. My son is 5 (Sept. birthday) and started Kindergarten this year. He entered kindergarten with all the skills he needed. Knowing his upper and lower case letters by sight, colors, shapes, numbers, etc. His preschool teacher said he is more than ready for Kindergarten.

    He is academically doing great. He is reading now and writes his name, numbers and letters almost perfectly. He is rhyming and making up stories. He can do addition up to 10+10, he counts to 100 by 10's - he loves school. He is making friends like crazy. He is always getting invited to his friends house and to every birthday party. The kids in school make stuff for him at home and bring it to him at school.

    I was recently told that he needed to be retained in Kindergarten because he is not mature enough. He gets frustrated or upset (weepy (sp?)) when he can not share his answer/is not called on or if he accidentally does something wrong. He gets distracted and needs to be reminded about what needs to be done next. The teacher said this is much improved from the beginning of the year but she still needs to remind him what comes next.

    Now my husband and I are on the fence about what to do. Do we keep him back in kindergarten where he would be learning colors and shapes, etc. all over again, get bored and be even more distracted or do we go against what the teacher says and move him to first grade and hope that he matures over the summer.

    HELP!!!
     
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  3. Sally

    Sally Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    It is difficult to assess your son without actually knowing him. I have been teaching for 8 years and can say that those fall babies can be difficult. They are often not mature enough to move on even though their academic skills may be high. I always like to tell my parents that even though their child may have good academics, and maturity might not be a big deal in K or 1st what is going to happen to your younger (in comparison to classmates)child when he is 13? The social maturity at that age is going to be a much bigger issue then it is now. Most parents I know in this situation have had the child repeat Kindergarten, just to give them a little more of an advantage. Good Luck, there is no easy answer-that is why it is such an important job! You sound like a wonderful parent.
     
  4. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    Thanks Sally for your reply - I guess I need to hear more examples of my situation where the child is academically strong but immature in ways to help us make our decision. Thanks again
     
  5. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

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    Apr 8, 2005

    I don't think you can really make your decision based on more examples of your situation. Each kid is different. What may have been best for another kid "like yours" won't necessarily work for your child. Ask the teacher or principal for ways that you can help him. Check around your community for resources.
     
  6. Mariaelena

    Mariaelena Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    nickasho9,
    Hi, i know it hard to hear that our kids had to retain in kindergarten but as a teacher if he is not mature in off its better to be retain in kinder it willbe easyerfor him and he wount suffer as muchas as if he was in a higher level, it will be a review for him. take the teachers advice she know whats better for your kid. I personally was retained in 2nd grade and it was hard to see my friends ahead of me.
    hope my adviced was helpful
     
  7. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    Thank you for your replies. My other issue is my daughter is a Sept. baby also so I guess I should hold her back as well when she is ready to start Kindergarten.

    My biggest concern with my son is that he will be teased by the other kids. That is another concern in holding him back. Kids are cruel and because he is so weepy/emotional I don't know how he will handle it.
     
  8. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    I would say don't make any decisions about your daughter based on your son. When she gets to that age, she may be a completely different child than your son. It is important not to assume that she will need to be retained as well, although that may be the case. At the kindergarten level, it seems like generally, there is very little teasing about being retained. I don't think kids really understand why it is happening, and while it may be hard at the time, to watch all of his friends go to first grade, there would be so much more teasing at a later point in time, when the kids really do grasp why someone is being retained.
     
  9. Mariaelena

    Mariaelena Rookie

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    Apr 8, 2005

    Nickasho;
    Hi again i agree on what stephanie says. Don`t worry :)
     
  10. CeCe

    CeCe Companion

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    Apr 8, 2005

    I have a similar situation with a little boy in my Kindergarten class. Academically, he is about average. (At the beg. of year, he was quite low, but he began attending my Ext. Lrng. program an extra hour per day & after two months, he caught up to the average kids in my class.) However, he is socially quite immature -- unable to solve conflicts by using his words, but hits and kicks instead. He cries very easily and has great difficulty sitting for more than a minute. Instead of sitting, listening, and participating in whole group activities, he is rolling around on the carpet with his face in the rug and his bottom in the air. He would much prefer to be home with his stay-at-home dad and when asked how he liked a particular story or activity, he frequently responds, "I didn't like it because I'd rather be home with my daddy." When I compare his drawings to the other children in the class, there is a drastic difference in maturity level. His drawings look like the average 3 year old's. His fine motor coordination is very very poor.

    I just conferenced with his parents & we are leaning heavily toward retention just so he can have an extra year to develop & mature. Dad was concerned that there would be teasing, but I have not found this to be a problem in Kindergarten. They usually don't realize who went to first grade & who went to Kindergarten. They just know that they have a summer break & then everyone comes back & has a different teacher. Some of their friends are in their new class & some went to a different class.

    I chose to keep my own son in PreK for an extra year & he started K when he was 6. He's now almost 16 & neither of us has ever regretted it. He is a strong & confident student with many friends. Personally, I think if there is any doubt about maturity level, it's best to give kids the gift of time. Otherwise, they may be struggling to catch up for the rest of their school years. Of course, each child is an individual & you cannot make this decision based on any other child's experiences. Every kid grows & matures on his/her own individual timetable. I just thought it might help to hear other stories. Best of luck to you in your decision!

    p.s. I think it would be a good idea to talk to the first grade teachers, like someone else suggested. I took work samples & talked to our first grade teachers before I recommended retention for the little guy in my class.
     
  11. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Thank you for your feedback. That is a great idea about talking with the first grade teachers. I really want to listen to the teacher because I am sure she knows better about his habits in school than I do. I am so confused for example - I just left his room to put him to bed and he said "Mom, I will read to you tonight and he read "Ten Apples up on Top" word for word. We have never read this book before and I could not believe he coudl read every word. He used his letter sounds etc. He seems so mature to me but then again I am a bit biast (sp?).
     
  12. Grammy Teacher

    Grammy Teacher Virtuoso

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    Nick, I am leaning toward the thought that retaining him might not be a bad idea. My husband was a young 5 year old in school, Sept. 1 birthday and he felt he was struggling all the way through. Consider the fact that kids with Sept. birthdays are as much as 9 months younger than some of their classmates and that can make quite a difference all around.
     
  13. JenColo

    JenColo Rookie

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    Apr 29, 2005

    I've been in your situation

    I am a parent with two boys who have summer birthdays. My oldest has always been mature for his age and therefore we had no problems. My youngest, whose birthday is in August, did fine academically however had the comment made to me by his kindergarten teacher that he was very young and a bit immature for his age. He wasn't disruptive, didn't have a behavior problem, and seemed to get along well with others. His problem was that he was quiet, which personally I beleive was not a immature problem but just his personality.

    The research on this very subject has shown that there may be somewhat of a struggle in the first few years of schooling, however, they "catch up" in 2nd/3rd grade. Also, once the child reaches jr. high, there are usually problems. If your child is doing well academically, then just think how easily he/she will go through elementary school, with no challenges or struggles academically. Apparently, what happens a lot is that they reach junior high and the challenges start and there are problems.

    He is now a confident 2nd grader who has come out of his shell since kindergarten. He is in advanced reading and math groups. I just can't imagine him going into 2nd grade next year with all that he does. I believe he would be bored and then who knows what problems we would have.

    As a side note, there are plenty of children whose parents retain them. In my son's 2nd grade class there are currently 4 children who are 9 years old. It seems very common these days to retain children so I don't think you would have too much of a problem.

    I just wanted to give you another view from another parent. It really depends on the child, however, I believe that there are other factors. Too bad we don't have that crystal ball! :)
     
  14. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Apr 29, 2005

    Hi JenColo -

    Thank you for your feedback. So I take it that you did not retain your son and he is doing fine now. Very interesting I enjoy hearing success stories about people who did not retain in Kindergartern.
    Thank you
     
  15. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    Apr 29, 2005

    Fall babies can be hard to place at times....but not always, I feel that parents and teachers are so quick to base things on age....last year my most mature and responsible student was a december baby, and with quite a few jan/feb babies, many of her classmates were almost a year older than her! It really depends on each child, they are all different. Does your district have any bridge classes? Not quite K anymore but not fully 1 yet? This may be a good option to look into...this way he can have the time and room to mature and still be challenged academically! It is an option many districts are starting to offer.....
     
  16. nickash09

    nickash09 Rookie

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    Hello love2teach

    We do not have the bridge class in our school district otherwise I would have not doubt but to do that. I really am struggling with this decision so I have called the school and asked for a PPT. To talk about what they will do for my son academically next year if he was to repeat.
     
  17. sbtellmann

    sbtellmann Companion

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    Apr 30, 2005

    I have a boy in my classroom just like this. He is very smart academically, but he is not ready for first grade maturity wise. He runs around screaming (laughing) and still cannot sit for even 5-10 minutes. His parents have decided to keep him in Kindergarten next year. I told them I think it is the best idea. All it can do is help. He would not be redy to sit and listen and learn to read in first grade. I believe your child's teacher is only trying to give him the best possible chance. As for the teasing, who are you afraid will tease? The new students will have no idea he was already in Kindergarten, and he could help them learn things he has already done. The teacher could use him as the helper! The first graders who see him might comment on it, but they really won't notice this young. If they do, they might already think that he needs some extra help. Children pick up on things. They know who needs help and who doesn't. My opinion is that you give your child the chance to mature over the next year and just get stronger in the Kindergarten standards. Hope it helps some! :)
     
  18. sdhudgins

    sdhudgins Comrade

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    Apr 30, 2005

    Girls tend to be more mature than boys. I'd watch her maturity level as school time nears.

    As for kids, yes they can be cruel. But if he's goign to be retained from what I've noticed the earlier the better.... especially when it comes to students teasing them.
     
  19. Peggy

    Peggy New Member

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    I'm responding as both a parent and an educator. My son has a September birthday, and after much agonizing, we let him stay in preschool an extra year. He knew colors, numbers, letters, how to write his name, how to tie his shoes, etc. but still was not mature enough for kindergarten. A wise preschool teacher advised us to "let him play" another year, and I have never regretted the decision. He's always been a leader and has done well on end-of-grade and other standardized tests. As an educator, I would love to see school systems change the cut-off for kindergarten entrance. I believe children should be 5 for a few months before they ever begin school. As much as we are demanding from children academically, they need as much preschool and/or mommy education as they can get.
     
  20. Teacher379

    Teacher379 Companion

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    I seriously think that if immaturity is the only reason why they want to have him retained,then (as a parent) would not accept it. Talk to the administration of the school, they have a sheet that explains what the requirements are to have a child retained and immaturity is not on there.
     
  21. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    I always understand wanting the best for your child because being a parent myself, I always want what is best for my son. I can't help but side with Teacher379's post above. If he knows so much, then is he just bored? All kids, no matter what age, need reminders. The whole weepy thing may just be a part of his personallity and don't think that one extra year will change that. Is he just sensitive? My son has a July birthday and we have batted around the idea of waiting until he's six to go to K. The more I think about it though, the more I don't want him to wait. If your son was experiencing an extreme immaturity then I would consider, but it sounds from what you have said, that he is just showing his personality traits and needs reminders. Even high schoolers need reminders sometimes! If it were me I probably wouldn't do it just based on what you have explained.

    Is he acting out (temper tantrums, etc.)? His he well behaved for the most part? If you said no and yes, then I would let him ahead. It shouldn't be based on her giving him some "reminders". I would trust what she says and take careful consideration, but don't make a hasty decision.
     
  22. MDmomof3

    MDmomof3 New Member

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    May 2, 2005

    Is there a school in your area that offers a pre-1st program? This is offered for those kids that just need a little extra time. My fall child was a repeater in preschool because of the change in birthdays that my state implemented and it was the best thing for him. As a mom of 2 kids that are on the older side, I highly recommend it. They are more mature, confident, and academically ahead of the younger kids (usually). Perhaps moving to another district for Kindergarten might alleviate the embarrassing issue and offer a new/different approach to the lesson plans. Also, putting him in full day Kindergarten, if he was not already there, is something different but still helpful in his emotional development while offering a change. FYI, I will most likely be holding my youngest child back (late summer bday) when she starts school having seen the benefits of being older vs. younger. I hope this helps!
     
  23. troxelboys

    troxelboys Rookie

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    :) I am a Sept baby and I have one of my own, I honestly believe that it was the best thing that my mother could have done was make me go through Kinder again. It really helped with my maturity level and I ended up making straight A's through high school and into college. I will difinitly hold my son back if need be.
     
  24. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    May 3, 2005

    I'm a late September baby... our cutoff was Sept. 30, and I'm the 22... barely made the cut. I DID start when I was still 4... and was an honor student all the way through college... but, most of my best friends have been from a class below me... and I have to wonder if this was just due to me having a different maturity level than many of the other kids in my class? Not neccessarily that I was "immature," but... hmmm.

    I don't think I would have had different results if I'd have been held back from K, other than that my mom would have gotten tired of having me at home... taught myself to read in preschool, was reading to my class when I was in K and 1 (even taught myself to read upside down so I could read "like the teacher.")... I'm glad I started when I did... I was almost a full year younger than many of the other kids in my grade, but that never bothered me.
     
  25. momteacher2

    momteacher2 New Member

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    May 3, 2005

    retention

    I was in this same situation last year. I did end up retaining my son and it has been a wonderful experience for both of us. Like your son, my son was academically ready but socially he was not. He cried over everything and was very sensitive. I am also a teacher so this was quite a blow to hear that my son should be retained. Once I got over my own feelings, I realize that the teacher was with him the whole year and saw him in the academic setting that he would be in for the next 12 years and I came to my senses. Teachers are usually right about these things. Even though this year has been a "review", his teacher worked with him at his level and made him the "expert" in the class. His self esteem soared and he actually loves school now. He has also become a great reader and will be a solid student in the fall when he starts first grade. Additionally, as a first grade teacher I have had younger boys in my class and the trasition has been very difficult for them. The social/maturity aspect of education is just as important as the academic level of the child.
    Talk to the kindergarten teacher and see what accommodations she can make for him next year and this might help you make a sound decision.
    It is a tough decision but you have to be at peace about whatever decision you make.
     
  26. litlmama

    litlmama Comrade

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    May 4, 2005

    My son is an Aug. b-day. We are starting him next year in K. I'm nervous, because I see what happens when these early birthdays get to 9th grade. Right now it may not be a huge issue, but in the future it could be detrimental. I guess my concern would be whether they can put him in a K-1 combo class or make sure they are going to work with him at a higher level. I tried to talk my husband into holding him out and doing one more year of pre-school, but I think I'm prepared for the discussion of his retention at the end of the year. It is definitely true that boys don't mature as early as girls and this really shows during the pre-teen and teenage years. I'm at the point when I can guess who my young students are on the second day of school.

    Good luck and let us know what you decide. Again, I'm looking at it happening next year, and I don't think it's really all that uncommon anymore. My son is reading and he's doing basic math, but BOY is he young!!!
     
  27. Cole

    Cole Companion

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    May 6, 2005

    I had this same problem this year, although not yet in kinder.

    My 4 year old is a late 4, and one of the youngest in his class. We initially thought about keeping him back a year, but after seeing how he has progressed academically, there is absolutely no way that we can.

    In fact, earlier in the year they were discussing bumping him to kinder this year instead of pre-k but I fealt he was incredibly too immature.

    Holding him back another year would do nothing but frustrate him more than he already is.

    He's already reading his older sister's books and memorizing her spelling words, and she is in 2nd grade.

    I'm just glad that my district has a G/T program starting in Kinder, or his teacher would hate us all.
     
  28. lexilla

    lexilla Rookie

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    May 7, 2005

    my son is also a sept. birthday, he started kindergarten at age 4 and turned 5 a couple of weeks later. He struggled with his classwork and I was told its because he's still very immature, but he'll catch on. By the end of that school year, he progressed much slower than his classmates but the teacher felt it best for him to move up to first grade and not hold him back. He struggled throughout first grade and was not held back but failed 1st grade. It was a mistake to not hold him back in kindergarten. He's still struggling now in 2nd grade and this is about the age where kids will be mean and tease and he now has this attitude "I'm not as smart as the other kids because I failed" and when asked what grade he's in he says, "I'm SUPPOSED to be in 3rd grade".

    If I could turn back time I would have held him back in kinder. since he was struggling with his work, but if his work would have been great like your childs, I think I would have let him go on to the next grade and pray his maturity level rises over the summer.
     
  29. Sarah Leigh Ann

    Sarah Leigh Ann Companion

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    I have two children in my class that should have been held back in kindergarten. They cry over the littlest thing! The other children get so annoyed by their crying. Those two students have not learned anything at all this year (well I'm sure they learned a little something) !! I do know that in my county to hold a child back it has to a be a comprehensive reason meeting at least one academic area and social or attendance.
     
  30. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    This is such a tough call. I teach Pre-K, and I get tons of parents, especially those with boy with fall birthdays, coming to me each year with the same concerns you have. I wouldn't automatically assume he's not ready to move on, based on the teacher's recommendation. I agree with what one of the other posters said...perhaps all of those things are just part of his personality? That won't change in a year's time And there are lots of studies that show that kids do "catch up" in maturity by 3rd grade.

    I like the idea of going to talk to the first grade teachers, and I also think it would be good if you can observe your son in class for a while to compare his behavior to the other kids'. Try to watch from a doorway, so that he doesn't see you right from the start (get the teacher's ok, first, of course!). You'll quickly be able to see if he stands out as immature compared to his classmates.

    I think that some teachers see a boy with a fall birthday and just say "oh he's too young," without really thinking about it. I'm not sure this is the case with your son, but if I were you, I'd make really sure that this retention is something that YOU think is best...otherwise, you'll second guess yourself and wonder "what if?" forever. If you DO think it's best, then you'll be comfortable with it and that's a good thing.
    Kim
     
  31. RRLL

    RRLL Rookie

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    May 17, 2005

    I am a kindergarten teacher (8yrs.) I will complete my master's degree in June and have done all of my research on retention over the past year. Each child is different and we don't know which children will benefit from retention. However, there is not any legit. research that shows positive results from retention. Children compare retenion to going blind, losing a parent, etc. It can be devastating. In the 8 yrs I have taught K I have retained 4 children. Only 1 child has had any positive results from this action. Talk with your child and see how he feels, does he feel ready for first? Also, what type of requirements does the first grade in your area have as far as testing, structured classrooms and seatwork, etc. I would even look for a multiage classroom where there is a mix of K-1 children. This is a very hard decision to make as a teacher or as a parent.

    Good Luck,
    RRLL
     
  32. litlmama

    litlmama Comrade

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    May 18, 2005

    Hi- it's me from the high school level. I find it hard to believe that by 3rd grade they catch up in maturity level. Mainly because I see them in 9th and it's painfully obvious when a kid is in school too early. Right now out of the kids who are failing my class plus others, 90% are on the very young side. They get into trouble because they have no concept of when to stop. I also have quite a few kids who were held back in K. They are happier in high school, well adjusted, and high performers. (Obviously not all, but a HUGE majority claim it was the best thing their parents did for them.) It's not research, but it is an observation over the past 10 years at the high school level.
     
  33. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    May 18, 2005

    At the middle school level, I have made the same observation. In 26 years, my school held back only four students, but should have done so for many others. Their parents refused to allow it, and it was mainly for sports reasons. (Don't get me started on that one!)

    But since I mentioned it, red-shirting down in the lower grades is pretty common in Indiana, what with the basketball-frenzied parents here.

    In other words, they want to hold back their perfectly capable sons down in the lower grades so they'll be bigger and stronger for sports when they get into the upper grades. BUT, they raise the roof if it's suggested that their older child just isn't ready to go on to the next grade.

    "He'll be too old to play ball his senior year!!!!!!"

    Please, parents, if your kindergarten child is babyish, let him/her repeat the grade. A babyish middle-schooler is the butt of horrible jokes and pranks, and the target for all kinds of peer abuse.

    Yes, and every student we've ever retained or tried to retain is a younger-than-average boy whose parents absolutely refuse to admit there is a problem with HIM or THEM; it's always the school who 'doesn't understand him.'

    Right.
     
  34. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    May 18, 2005

    Just a thought/question: do any of you think it would be easier to send the child to K and let them repeat K, or let them repeat preschool twice and send them to K a year later? I ask this because my son has a July birthday, but is extremely bored very easily because he knows so much already. He's not even three yet so it's not like I have a decision to make right now, but this kind of instance crosses my mind and I seem to waffle in the idea. One minute I am totally against it, the next minute I wonder if it would be better. Thoughts?
     
  35. litlmama

    litlmama Comrade

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    May 18, 2005

    We are sending My August b-day to K this year. Academically he is ready to go. We also understand that if he doesn't grow he will have to do K again. His pre-school teacher has advised that we send him to K, because the older kids will have a better "influence" than the younger kids he would be surrounded with next year. He has grown up with older kids (teenagers, swimmers, students) he is more at ease with the kids in our neighborhood that are a year or two older than with the kids at school who are the same age. We have already told him that sometimes kids have to take K two times to get really good at school and there is nothing bad about it. We put a positive spin on it, because our neighbor was held back last year and there is a very real possibility he will have to be held back next year...

    That's just my thought... he can read and do basic math... I feel like one more year of Pre may be a disadvantage. He also relies heavily on structure. That has been the best thing about Pre, we are hoping K will be as beneficial. Plus there is a really good K teacher who may be moving on in the next couple of years.
     
  36. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    May 18, 2005

    Good point about the positive role models that older kids make. That's something I haven't thought of.
     
  37. MDmomof3

    MDmomof3 New Member

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    May 18, 2005

    My son is a November b-day and Maryland was in the process of changing the birthday requirements. He was able to start the 3s but then had to repeat them because he missed the cutoff. It was the best thing for him. I was fortunate to have been able to go from a 3 day program the 1st year to a 5 day program for his repeat 3s. It was different, more "work" and he was older. He thrived. Is this a possiblity for "Frogspond?" He didn't notice and is no worse for the wear!!
     
  38. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    May 18, 2005

    We have the option of half days and full days, but not the number of days. Depending on where I am working will determine what kind of days he'll be in when he's in K.
     
  39. CeCe

    CeCe Companion

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    May 18, 2005

    This is such a tough call because bottom line is, we don't have a crystal ball and we can't see what the future holds for our kids. When I made the decision to keep my son (July b'day) in Pre-K an extra year & start Kindergarten at age 6, I just went with my gut feeling. My co-teaching partner did the same thing with her son with an August b'day. Neither of us has ever regretted it and now that they are 9th graders I REALLY see the benefits of being a little older. I think both boys have a confidence level that we might not be seeing if they had started school a year earlier. Middle & high school years can be challenging from a social aspect. Being a little more mature only works to their advantage, I think.
     
  40. lee3296

    lee3296 New Member

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    Jun 3, 2005

    I have a question, my friends daughter's teacher wants to retain her in kindergarten. She is totally against this. However, the teacher says she can not do anything about this. Is this true. Can you legally retain a kinder student without parental consent in texas?
     
  41. lowrie

    lowrie Companion

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    Jun 4, 2005

    Having agonized over the decision of starting kindergarten or waiting a year (rather than doing a year and retaining) I'm in a somewhat different boat than other parents on this issue. Our cut off date for school is December 31st. (IE: If your child turns 5 by December 31st of the year, they are eligible for kindergarten. My oldest son was born on December 17th, 1991. We agonized from early on whether to send him. Academically he was extremely high, early talker, early reader etc. Yes, he was less "mature" than some of his classmates but not in a way that was disruptive to the class or made him a difficult child in class.

    He's 13 now and just finishing grade 8. He goes to high school in the fall, starting grade 9 three and a half months before he turns 14. He made the A/A+ Honour roll last report card and has won a Striving for Excellence Principal's Award for Self Control.

    The bottom line on this issue is that you just need to decide what you are going to choose to do with your child and then accept your decision. Don't second guess yourself once you choose! My sister has a son that is exactly 2 weeks younger than mine (he was born the afternoon of December 31st.) She chose to wait a year before enrolling him in school and it has worked well for her. I think that this has to be a personal decision and you can get all the advice you want, but you still have to make your own choice and then accept it.

    I will say that if you are leaning toward retention, then doing it in Kindergarten is much better than waiting until later in school!

    Lee, I can't speak to Texas specifically (I'm in Canada) but I know that here you cannot retain a student without parental consent. Perhaps your friend needs to research at her school district office and through the principal? Good luck!
     

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