Resume Critique

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Leaborb192, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Nov 28, 2017

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Nov 28, 2017

    Can you combine your student teaching positions together? And your tutoring positions? Like this...

    Tutor, private (virtual and face-to-face) and SCHOOL Aug 10 to Aug 16
    • Privately tutored K-12 students and teacher candidates
    • Tutored college-level Spanish 101-204 students with special needs; worked with professors to develop individualized lesson plans

    I think that you can tighten up the description on your substitute position into fewer bullet points. I might do something like...
    • Taught prepared lesson plans with fidelity across all content areas and grade levels
    • Implemented classroom and schoolwide management and discipline plans
    • Delivered specialized instruction as directed, including small groups, test review, etc.
    • Collaborated and co-taught with teachers
     
  4. Kyle Spearin

    Kyle Spearin Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2017

    I recommend consolidating your resume to 1 page if possible. Only focus on the absolutely necessary experience relevant to teaching. As far as the wording, you can aim to make each point more actionable to help you stand out. For example:
    "Worked as a K12 sub in all content areas" becomes Frequently (be specific) recommended sub for grades K-12.
     
  5. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Nov 28, 2017

    I don't understand why you'd omit full-time teaching experience--even if it was in another state.

    Additionally, the resume should definitely be consolidated to one page.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
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  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Nov 28, 2017

    This.

    You have a two year gap. Questions will be asked. If it seems as though you’re hiding your previous experience, your resume will end up in the no pile.
     
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  7. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Nov 28, 2017

    I don't think I would keep Community Involvement or Honours/Achievements. The volunteer experience and PD I think need more detail to be worth including. I would take out the word Nationwide - it sounds over the top to me.
     
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  8. heatherberm

    heatherberm Cohort

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    Nov 28, 2017

    I agree with the suggestions on how to consolidate various subbing and tutoring experiences into one entry for each. I'd also lose community involvement and honors/achievements, and if you need the space, maybe even the PD. Most of them are pretty generic-sounding and I'm not sure any of them would jump off the page.
    I *completely* agree that there's zero reason to leave off your AZ experience unless you're worried about a negative reference. Actual full-time teaching experience is more valuable than anything else on your resume even if it's in another state. As saturated as NYS is right now in most areas, every bit of experience helps. Am I wrong or did you teach in an ESL-heavy school in AZ? If so, in some districts that's a huge plus that you should be taking advantage of.
     
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  9. CherryOak

    CherryOak Comrade

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    Nov 28, 2017

    I want to be bold enough to just throw my resume out on a forum for critiquing. Go you. Here's my gut instinct on ideas for you to consider:

    - With the endorsements listed as pending, I'd bring the current college enrollment back in.
    - Don't hide your teaching experience. Those years teaching need to have more inches out of the 11 than anything else. Prime real estate.
    - Minimizing the contact info could save some inches. One of my fav tricks - Put a line under your name all the way across and then put all the contact info in small, but all caps in a line right under it.
    - I'd prefer for what you're doing right now (subbing?) to be in the present tense.
    - Experiment with the fonts. Sans serifs may feel more modern. No matter what, see which fonts help you get to that one page goal.
     
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  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Nov 30, 2017

    OK, I'm not the best Danielson fan, but I do think that you should be able to use verbs that are a higher caliber action word in a vast majority of the resume. Additionally, unless you are simply choosing to sub in your new job, accept that HR knows what a sub does, and whittle down to a couple of lines at best. As far as the tutoring, I am left wondering what you are teaching, so tell me - I'm not a mind reader.

    I, too, endorse not only mentioning but filling in that gap with relevant information about your AZ job. It has to read better than multiple lines about subbing, and it will be seen as more important to a future job placement. The volunteering is overshadowed by actual paid teaching experience, therefore redundant. Lose that community section - irrelevant. Current thinking even questions dates of education, so if you aren't going to mention AZ, you might not want to mention years you were in college.

    Personally, I believe that a professionally prepared resume is the best investment you could/should treat yourself to after all of your education and experience. I have my resume rewritten after every new certification or degree addition. I don't mince words about my expectations or sign off until I am satisfied. Of course, I also believe that each person will find what feels right to them. I just refuse to spend the countless hours that I would invest in revisions, formatting, word choice. I was told that you have less than 30 seconds to impress with your resume. It's worth getting right.

    In reading this response, I realize that I may sound harsh, but you have brought your work here to be critiqued. I opened the thread while at work, so my time was tight, perhaps making it sound curt, but in rereading it, I feel that I have given an honest assessment. You are also really going to want to do some research on the look of the resume. Professional resumes have a look to them - not cutesy, but dignified. That "something extra" is eye appeal, and it counts more than you know, especially when coupled with a well crafted resume. The pros present an aesthetically pleasing product that portrays professionalism and attention to detail. Buzz words morph from year to year, and they are something that draw the eye of the HR or principal who is evaluating your resume. The small details matter, IMHO. My son had a resume that was approved by the college career center, not too different from yours, and applications went out, but interviews didn't materialize. Once I saw the "approved" resume, I saw red. My gift was a professionally written resume. The interviews immediately started coming when the resume was replaced. When he finished his MEd., I treated him to a rewrite, and the interviews increased, followed closely by serious job offers. He had to choose between 4 job offers when he used the new resume, coupled with increased interview experience and exposure. He is happy and in his second year of what he calls his ideal job, and he gives a lot of credit to the resume. I am sure that the interview experience didn't hurt, either, but if the resume doesn't result in an interview, it didn't do its job, did it? I know that the cost for the resume for a recent college grad is less than what I pay for my resume/updates. His came as a complete package - cover letter, follow up thank you note, and electronic version ideal for things like Applitrack.

    Let me wish you the best of luck as you approach the end of your coursework. My son told me that his sharp resume gave his an extra shot of confidence going forward. Since I also have my resume updated regularly, I fully understand what he is talking about. I love the "look" of the formatting, and it makes me proud to share it with potential employers. I hope your final revise will give you that same confidence boost. Best wishes!
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2017

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