Resource

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Starting_Over, May 9, 2006.

  1. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 9, 2006

    Hi Everyone,

    I've been reading through the threads, and I was wondering is there some special training that you need to become a Resource teacher? I think that I would really be interested in that. Are Resource classrooms mostly in Elementary Schools, or Middle and High school also?

    Thanks in advance.;)
     
  2.  
  3. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 9, 2006

    A resource room teacher has to be cert. in Special Ed. At least that is how it is in Maine. You would have to write IEPs and attend PETs and do all that fun stuff that a special ed teacher does.
     
  4. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    May 9, 2006


    Same here, you need to be certified in Spec. Ed.
     
  5. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 10, 2006

    Thanks for the info. So, when those types of jobs are available, are they usually posted as "Resource" positions, or are they just listed as Special Education and you don't know what type of position until you go in for the interview?

    When searching jobs, I always see just Special Ed., but never any specifics, so I was just curious if maybe that's because Resource teaching positions are rarely available, or because they just group it all together under Special Ed.:confused:
     
  6. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 10, 2006

    When applying for a position, you will have to provide a copy of your teaching certificate. Mine lists that I have a degree in Elem. Ed. with other Sp.Ed. certifications. When you go for the interview they will let you know whether it is a Self-Contained, Resource, or Inclusion position. If you have Special Education certification, you can serve in any of the three situations.
     
  7. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 10, 2006

    Thanks for explaining that:)
     
  8. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 10, 2006

    The ads here say what they are for.

    Here are some that where posted today:
    Special Education Teacher - K-3 Day Treatment Program
    Special Education, Resource Room Teacher
    Special Education Ed Tech II
    Special Education Behavioral Teacher

    Grade 7/8 Special Education Resource Teacher
    Special Education Teacher (Self Contained)
     
  9. wanateach

    wanateach Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 11, 2006

    I was interviewed for a resource room along with the self contained I was really interested in, but found I didn't think it would be for me, just because of the scheduling, that is a big factor-they are pulled out of their regular program and you have to almost fight for time for them, because that will affect their regular classroom schedule, and according to how it is planned, may be difficult for them to do both-I guess I got the feeling you would need to be pretty agressive in your approach with the other teachers, you know?
     
  10. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 11, 2006

    I've found that scheduling has always been a major problem for me. Not just with Resource students, but also with Self-Contained as well as Inclusion. Usually we have an aide that can go into other Inclusion classrooms or assist in resource/self-contained when needed. If you are very fortunate, you may be assigned a good one. My experience has taught me that they are few and far between.
     
  11. Starting_Over

    Starting_Over Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 12, 2006

    You mean you have to go to their Regular Ed. Classrooms and pull them out? Don't the teachers understand why and try to work with you? Or do they have a problem with that and act as if you're bothering them when you go to get them?:confused:
     
  12. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,143
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 12, 2006

    In our school we have a scheduling committee that schedules when all classes are having their reading/l-arts block, math block, science block, etc. When reading is going on in the regular classroom, the spec. ed. kids are sent to their respective resource rooms for their work. Not all kids are pulled out for core curriculum subjects, some just come for one subject, or just for one period of support and some teachers go into the classroom for in-class support for a core subject. In our district the LDTC's write the IEPs, the spec. ed. teachers just come up with the goals and objectives, and about a paragraph or two that gets included in the IEPs when you have your annual meetings. It all depends on the District. Some kids need to be placed in a smaller classroom setting to allow extra time for processing, completing tests, alternate learning styles, etc., and many feel more comfortable in the smaller group. They do attend all their special classes, like gym and art, with their regular "homeroom" class. Hope this helps.
     
  13. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 13, 2006

    What is LDTC?
     
  14. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,143
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 14, 2006

    Learning Disabilities Teacher Consultant - they are the Case Managers, the ones who coordinate the meetings for each of the classified kids, arrange testing, communicate concerns with the parents.
     
  15. wanateach

    wanateach Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 14, 2006

    teacher333-what age level are you talking about? High school? I interviewed for middle school-5th and 6th graders, I guess it would be similar-do you have difficulties with the regular teachers as far as tug of war with the kids? This principal indicated that I would have trouble with them as far as pulling them out of their class, because whatever they missed I guess they are still responsible for? I think different schools do it differently. When you have a variety of grade levels and abilities you are going to have more scheduling/structure time with them. Hope this helps a little, I am still in the dark about some things.
     
  16. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

    Joined:
    May 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,143
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 15, 2006

    I am a 5th grade resource, had been a 4th grade R.T. I find the reg. ed teachers are eager for me to take my kids as they sometimes are "lost" during regular ed instruction. They should, by law, not be "missing" anything, especially gym (at least in NJ it is illegal to pull them out of gym for some reason). Their special ed pullouts should be done around their time in the regular ed classroom, and it should be up to the principal to come up with some kind of master schedule to be sure they are not missing things. If they are offered a pullout Support class, kind of like a study hall I guess, you could always make up some of the work.
     
  17. wanateach

    wanateach Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 15, 2006

    Thanks this helps, because truthfully it sort of alerted me, the way this principal attacked this question with me-apparently it is a struggle. She said, "How do you resolve a potential conflict with a teacher who may need him in her room at that time for that particular class, how would you deal with that-I said "I think the teacher should be understanding that I would need him to help him decipher or understand the material-that the teacher should understand that and want to get him more help if he needs it-is that wrong? Shouldn't the regular ed teachers WANT to work with you on this, aren't we all on the same team with the same goal-success for these kids? I am just puzzled by this.
     
  18. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 15, 2006

    That is the way it SHOULD work. Unfortunately, some teachers are resistant to any change in their routine, especially if they have been teaching for a long time. Some will even try to tell the special ed teacher how to do her job. I have found that the younger teachers, just out of college, are more willing to work with you. I think a lot of it depends on the principal, and if he/she is willing to support you when you are trying to serve your kids.
     
  19. wanateach

    wanateach Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    188
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 15, 2006

    Thanks a reality check is what I needed-sometimes you get blindsided by things you think ought not to even be an issue, you know? Granted, I am an idealist-but I also have kids of my own so I know how the world works-but this should be something to be worked out. Who wins in these situations? Survival of the fittest? The one who can hold her ground-this seems so childish to me. Lori
     
  20. jhamm57

    jhamm57 Rookie

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 15, 2006

    Such is the way of the world. If we lived on an ideal planet, and everything was perfect, things would get pretty boring, don't you think? I try to look at each problem as a challenge and hold my ground when I know I am right. It is difficult at times, but when things work out, it can be very rewarding.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ima Teacher
Total: 163 (members: 1, guests: 135, robots: 27)
test