Resigning at the beginning of the school year

Discussion in 'General Education' started by EGrace, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. EGrace

    EGrace Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2019

    Hello

    I had a dream teaching job in TN and unfortunately had to resign due to my husband relocating to GA for work. The job I accepted (first day of school was today!) I'm completely miserable at. I've left in tears everyday. The schools lacks resources, is very disorganized, the people I'm working directly with are not helpful and it's way more work than i'm used to. Today the students were so poorly behaved on the first day I was shocked. I feel like I'm already drowning and just really can't see myself even making it a month longer.

    Has anyone else resigned after the school year has started? Did it severely impact you finding another job in the future? Did they let you resign or hold you for a certain time? The only thing that's stopping me now is fear of retaliation against my license or having to put this on my resume/preventing me from getting a position I enjoy.

    Thank you for your advice!
     
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  3. Tired Teacher

    Tired Teacher Comrade

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    Aug 12, 2019

    It will hopefully get better! Starting any new school is tough at first. Try to tell yourself you'll give it a month if you can. Then reconsider if you could do another month. Repeat: at the end of every month. Organize your own room and make it your happy place if you can.
    Every state is different. They can pull your license from here for at least a yr and fine you too. If you left a district at the start of a yr, you'd be blackballed too where I live. Try to give it a chance. Other teachers might "warm up " to you after they get their stuff done. Best wishes! I am sorry you are going through such a hard time.
     
  4. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    Aug 12, 2019

    You have to think of the long term effect of leaving right now. Will your license be pulled? Even if the state doesn't pull you license will you be blackballed from future hire. Do what you can to make the best of the situation. Focus on your students and your class. Teach your behavior expectations and hold students accountable as well as you can. If you really give it a go and can't make it through the year, for your own state of mind, leave.
     
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  5. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    Aug 12, 2019

    Double post
     
  6. Pisces

    Pisces Rookie

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    Aug 12, 2019

    I work at a "fancy" private school in Georgia. We had a teacher resign last week and tomorrow is the first day of school. She took another job at a school she liked better. She is fine. We have a sub in place until we find another teacher.
    Do what's best for you. If you are miserable (like that other teacher was), resign. Being miserable at a job does a disservice to both students and yourself.
    Long gone are the days of "blackballing" as there is a teacher shortage.
     
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  7. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 12, 2019

    Wow, sorry it started so difficult for you. I would take it one day at a time. Colleagues that might be a bit cold might warm up once they get to know you. There might be some good resources on campus that others don't use. You might find yourself enjoying teaching the students more. I'd give it some time. Yes, if it is awful and you can't take it anymore, than for the sake of sanity you might have to consider resigning. You could discuss with P and she might understand that you really tried and allow you to resign with little consequence. I suggest giving it some time and see how things go.
     
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  8. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Companion

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    Aug 13, 2019

    I was always told not to quit a job until I had another job in place. See about transferring vs. quitting!
     
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  9. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Aug 14, 2019

    I feel like you should stay around a little longer. My PERSONAL philosophy is to never leave until the end of the year. I have had years that I went to work everyday in tears. The worst job I ever had made me physically ill with REAL, identifiable symptoms. I thought I was dying and I still went to work everyday. I have worked at several different schools, but have never left until the school year was up. I am not sharing this to sound like a martyr, but to show you that you truly can make it through anything. But, you definitely have to make the right decision for YOU.

    If you do leave, they probably will hold you for a while. Most places will hold 2 weeks to a month.

    I know this sounds so cliche', but each job, (even the worst one) has taught me something about myself.
     
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  10. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Aug 14, 2019

    I had to leave a job in November to move to Georgia! I hated to do it but my family had to come first and my principal understood. I would say it did not impact me getting a job in ANY way! I did start of subbing first so I think that helped but I don't think they even asked me about it. If you are in the Cobb/Cherokee area let me know and I will try to help!
     
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  11. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Aug 15, 2019

    I understand this and respect it but I disagree personally. I've had a job that also was physically affecting me, and I decided to leave, because I needed to put my personal health above the guilt I had about leaving. I was leaving work crying every night at 7pm and was purely miserable. It's a personal choice and I respect either the decision to stay or go. It's unfortunate that some states will hold your license or black ball you. Requiring advance notice is acceptable but a year is a long time to be that unhappy, and there are few jobs that would require you to do that.
     
  12. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Aug 17, 2019

    I would also agree with giving it some time. The beginning is often the most difficult part, especially if you left a place where you were very comfortable and familiar with systems and people. If you're still miserable a few months in, at the semester, or at the end of the year, then resign. It's okay to put yourself first, but give yourself an opportunity to adjust to all of the newness before you resign.

    I'm not at all in the same situation you are in, but I am at a new building and in a new grade level this year. It's the same district I've been in, and the people and resources are great. That said, I've experienced the challenges that come with being in a new setting (things as simple as learning which door to go to when it's time to pick the kids up from recess, and learning how the breakfast routine works). Despite my nine years of teaching experience in multiple grades and settings, I'm also being "coached" by someone, which means losing a lot of plan times to meetings with the coach and being forced to do things her way rather than being true to myself as a teacher. While I truly appreciate the support of having a coach, I'm reminded of how difficult changing buildings can be. It seems that I get so comfortable being somewhere for a few years that I forget all that comes with being the new person in a new setting. Now that I'm in my fifth building, I'm trying to remind myself that things will get better. They almost always do. Soon, I'll know the routines of the building and where to find things without having to ask someone. Soon, the coach will let go, I'll be free to do things my own way, and I'll have my plan times back. Soon, I'll figure out the strategies necessary for working with this new grade level of students. It will all come in time. I just have to be patient and hang in there.

    I would suggest that the same may be true for you. Hang in there, be patient, give it time. If you're still miserable after you've given yourself time to adjust, then resign. I resigned mid-year my second year teaching, and it has never presented a problem for me. In fact, it was one of the best career and life decisions I've made. But I gave myself time to work it out, and I waited until the time was right for resigning.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
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