resignation consequences???

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by sunni11, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. sunni11

    sunni11 Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2011

    Hello,

    If one happens to find themselves in a teaching situation where they are very unhappy, does anyone know how damaging it is to your record to resign? How much would that hinder one's ability to get hired with a new district?
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Feb 24, 2011

    I think it depends on where you work now and where you'll be looking for work. For example, I took a job that I was really unsure about this year. I moved over 12,000 miles away from any family/friends totally by myself to an area that is extemely different culturally to where I used to live. I kept in mind that if I found I really hated it and wanted to try to look closer to home again, I'd have some pretty good reasons for resigning. I could easily say that I loved the job, got along with co workers/administration, etc. so that it would not make me look "bad" in any way. I could simply say that I wanted to be closer to family, that I did not like living in my geographic area, etc. If you could say something like that, I think it would not look bad at all. Even if you are close to home now, could you look in a new area and say something about how you've always wanted to live in that new area? I think there are a lot of ways you can spin it especially if you're willing to move. I'm not as happy with the area I live in, but for now I love my job so much that I'm going to stick it out for at least another year.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Feb 24, 2011

    It can have a huge impact, no impact at all, or something in between.

    Some districts are able to request that your license be suspended, preventing you from obtaining a teaching job in the same state for a period of time. Other districts don't really give a rat's patoot.

    I think it's in your best interest to finish the year and begin looking for a new job to start in the fall.
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Feb 25, 2011

    I most definitely think that finishing the year is crucially important. If I were an administrator looking to hire a teacher who left midyear, there would have to be a really significant and unfortunate occurrence in the person's life (more than even death of a loved one) for me to take a chance with that person over the tons of other people that are likely applying. I hate to sound harsh, and I don't want to be unsympathetic to what you may be going through, because I have left positions after short periods of time because I simply have high expectations of work environments. BUT, just know what the other side is going to think :).

    If you're leaving after the year is over, I think it then moves on to how many years you put in. If you left after 1 year, and didn't have a good reason, it may not look great. The more time, the better.

    However, at the end of the day, your life is bigger than your career, so you have to balance that - if you are that miserable and have a very strong reason for leaving, those considerations may come into play.

    I would definitely suggest giving thought to what you would do professionally next, and where. If at all possible, get a job in another district before you leave this one. Keep in mind the economy - its not a very good time for a teacher to be unemployed, unfortunately.

    Sorry for the strong words, but there was a time about 10 years ago when I was about to drop out of grad school, and a good friend talked me out of it the night before with some strong words discouraging me from leaving - it saved my career. I was really unhappy at the moment, but the moment passed :).
     
  6. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Oh I think I misunderstood- I just assumed you meant resigning at the end of the school year and looking for a new job next fall. If that's not what you mean- definitely do not quit in the middle of the year! I think that would look really bad any way you spin it- even if it's a terrible situation you really do need to at least finish out the year. Finding a new job is difficult already- I would say it would be pretty much impossible if you have something like that tarnishing your record. Like eded said I would also think about finding a job before you leave your current district- is it so bad that you'd rather be unemployed? I guess that's up to you to decide- but if I decide to leave here (maybe in another 2 years or so) I'm going to make sure I have another job before I officially quit.
     
  7. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Feb 25, 2011

    I resigned mid-year during a terrible, terrible year... but I had lined up another job before I submitted my resignation. However - I resigned BEFORE I had signed my contract for the year (in that district, contracts were signed in December).

    If you'll be breaking a contract, you need to make sure that there are no legal ramifications. It's a difficult, heart-breaking decision to make. I wish you luck.
     
  8. Joelg1980

    Joelg1980 Companion

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    Mar 2, 2011

    I considered doing the same thing a few times this year. I accepted a great job away from my family and had moments where I thought I would need to resign. Weigh how much your absence would hurt your students. I have developed rich and lasting relationships, and I know my leaving would be horrible on them. Also, weigh what you expect administration to think. This may be a hard year, but even worse if they are blindsided by this. Also, do you have a contract? IL is right to work, and teachers don't get contracts until they are tenured (4-5 years depending on the district).
     

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