Requesting advice re inner city SPED position

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by SpecialEdTeache, Feb 23, 2010.

  1. SpecialEdTeache

    SpecialEdTeache Companion

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    Feb 23, 2010

    Hi everyone,

    I'm excited and a bit nervous at the same time. I expect to get a job offer as soon as my background search comes back.

    What is a tackful way of finding out if I would be spending the majority of my time working with the kids with IEPs and not as a policewoman for the other kids with behavior problems? I know they need help with the other kids, and I would be glad to do what I can. I was told it is a full inclusion position, but I know I will need some pull-out time in order to be effective and see progress with my caseload.

    Should I ask for clarification before accepting the job?
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 23, 2010

    I guess the tactful thing to say to you is have the administration clarify for you what your job responsibilities will be. If you aren't happy with your responsibilities, I would not accept the job. I'm not trying to be mean, just giving you the reality of the situation. In most new jobs, we can't set the parameters.
     
  4. SpecialEdTeache

    SpecialEdTeache Companion

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    Feb 23, 2010

    That sounds like good advice, swansong. And, I didn't mean to come across like I wouldn't help with kids without IEPs, just that I could not see how a SPED teacher could be effective and not have her kids be her priority.
     
  5. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 23, 2010

    I absolutely completely agree with you. In order for us to be effective, our children with IEP's should be our first priority. Unfortunately, the reality of the situation where I am is that my class is not capped with regard to numbers or disabilities. I am expected to make each student reach a years worth of growth even though the most I can give them is 15 minutes of direct instruction because I have to meet with 10 reading groups daily for example.
    If you are teaching full inclusion, you may not have time to do pull outs, so perhaps you can meet with small groups in the classroom and add a couple of the more challenging ones to your groups. Maybe with more attention from you, the behaviors may lessen.
    Good luck with the job if you decide to accept it. What grade levels will you be teaching?
     
  6. Evian

    Evian Rookie

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    Feb 24, 2010

    Have you ever taught in an inner city school as a sub? I believe every teacher before accepting a full time teaching position should work as a sub for a while. Why? When you are a sub you get to check out a lot of schools. You find out pretty quickly which one you wouldn't mine applying to and which you would never in your life apply to.
     

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