Reprimanded by Administrator

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by mcamp84, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. mcamp84

    mcamp84 New Member

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    Oct 15, 2014

    Today I substituted for 6th grade. The children did not listen to me at all. They were very loud and yelling. Of course the teacher did not leave enough work for them. They claimed they finished most of the assignments yesterday. The Administrator came in the room & told the students they were being too loud as well as a couple of teachers. Then the Administrator called me out in the hallway & stated that I needed to take control of the children. She said I couldn't allow them to act like that. At that moment I became very irritated and upset. I yelled at the students and they were quiet for a while and then they went back to acting up. I was suppose to return to that school for the rest of the week, but I received a notification in AESOP that I was removed from the position. I'm sure it was that administrators' doing! I have been at that school before & that lady always rubs me the wrong way! She always makes it seem like it's my fault the children are acting out. I don't even want to take assignments at that school anymore!! I never had that experience at any other school. Even when the children act up the staff never blames me! They understand that children act out when there is a sub. I raise my voice at the children and call the office if they won't listen. What more does this lady want from me? I never have had a problem like this at any other school. Has this ever happened to you?
     
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  3. El sol

    El sol Rookie

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    Oct 15, 2014

    Just document stuff like that for future reference. I always took pictures of the sketchy classroom lessons, specially if they were minimal, incomplete, or not clear. I also kept a journal and made a note that no plans were provided.

    As a sub, you can choose your top schools to work for. If the district is big enough, continue looking to find the schools you're comfortable teaching at. You have to protect your job.

    If you were removed from the position, take it as a sign that you need to stay away from that school.
     
  4. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 16, 2014

    As a sub, you should be prepared with additional activities if you run out of things to do: a read aloud, a math game, word searches. You can also ask nearby teachers for additional work.
    An out or control classroom is not a safe place. Tighten up your mgt or run the risk of not being used as a sub.
     
  5. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Oct 16, 2014

    Bottom line-it's her school, and she can do what she wants to. Sorry, that might not be "fair", but it is what it is. You and your style just might not be a good fit for that environment. So you can either dwell on it, or choose to write it off as their loss and move on to other schools.
     
  6. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Oct 16, 2014

    If you were removed from a job at that school, it's likely you may be blocked from that school, period, so you may not have the option of going back there. We have a few subs in our district who have been blocked from seeing jobs at our school for various reasons.

    You should:

    - Document when plans are inadequate.
    - Not be afraid to ask for help!
    - Have a better management plan than raising your voice. Maybe a reward, or break them into teams and give positive points, whatever.
    - Have back-up plans in case of emergencies: puzzles, books, coloring sheets, Play-doh, whatever depending on the grade level.

    Even if you do all of those things, sometimes a school might just not be a good fit. This sounds like it might be one of those times. Learn from it, and move on!
     
  7. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 16, 2014

    You might want to expand your classroom management arsenal to include more strategies besides yelling and calling the office.
     
  8. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Oct 17, 2014

    It never fails. I've noticed on this forum that when someone expresses distress an asks for help, people just tell them they're doing things wrong. Caesar, seriously. Your comment is about as helpful and kind as a steel pipe to the head.

    The good thing about subbing is you don't have to to back to a bad school. You'll also learn what grades you prefer, and once you've built up some successes, you can stay away from the grades that are more difficult.

    Sometimes you need to raise your voice over the noise to get their attention. Then you're done with loud. Speak in an even tone that expresses no tolerance for interruptions. Explain to them that if they can't occupy themselves, you will do it for them, and assign a five paragraph essay on how to behave when their regular teacher is gone. They'll ask if they "have to" do it. Yes. You have to do it. Fifth and sixth graders want to bargain. Don't go there. It takes a while, but you learn not to outwardly express any hesitation about what you're doing. Tell them this is the way it is, and if their teacher has a problem with it, she can talk to you.

    If you can take away recess, start making hash marks on the board to indicate the number of times you've had to stop instruction to ask for attention. Each mark is one minute of lost recess with heads down and complete silence.
    Another good thing to do is create a seating chart if one is not left for you. When they're acting up, mark who it is on the chart. You don't even need names. Just the location. It can be hard to identify exactly who is causing the problems, but if they know you're turning them in, they're more likely to get in line. When I subbed, I did things like start to write my letter to the teacher under the document camera so they could see what I was writing. That age is nosy enough to stop what they're doing and read it. It doesn't matter if that's the note you end up leaving or not.

    I agree it is hard to control a class that refuses to cooperate. The only way to learn how to do it is to do it. You try, you fail, you learn from the failures.
     
  9. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

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    Oct 17, 2014

    You didn't take control of the classroom. Period. Classroom management is part of the job.

    jen12, I'm not sure why you're going at Caesar when you basically said the same thing she did, except you gave an example.
     
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 17, 2014

    I wasn't trying to be a jerk. The OP asked, "What more does this lady want from me?" I think that the administrator probably wants the OP to have better classroom management. It is my opinion, therefore, that the OP could benefit from learning different classroom management techniques. The only two techniques described in the original post (yelling and calling the office) don't seem to be working.

    It's true that many students act up when there is a sub. That's not a reason to avoid developing strong classroom management skills. I thought that my suggestion was helpful. If you think it was stupid, you're free to ignore it and me. *shrug*
     
  11. nyteacher29

    nyteacher29 Comrade

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    Oct 17, 2014

    as a sub or regular classroom teacher, classroom management is the key but yelling and screaming is NOT an effective strategy, in mho. I agree with others, brush up on classroom management strategies which do not include yelling or calling the office. the author WONG has great books that you may want to look at.

    On another note--I do not really see how Caesars post was "as helpful as a pipe to the head". The OP asked for advice which usually implies, "what am i doing wrong and how can i fix it", which Caesar answered. I think it's important to remember that we are writing our responses and our tones can be misinterpreted
     
  12. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Oct 18, 2014

    I was a sub for many years and worked with all grade levels. I now teach special ed - have also taught all grade levels and levels of disability from mild/moderate to moderate/severe, emotional disturbance and autism. I've had similar experiences. I learned from them.

    I rarely raise my voice with my current class. There is no need. I am there every day and just a look or a gesture from me is enough.

    When you sub, the children have no prior experience with you. They will test, test, test you and see if you can break. It's not as though they huddled together before you arrived and plotted and planned their behaviors. It's just how it is with some classes. Middle school can be tough regardless of whether you are experienced or not.

    I'm not sure what good comes from calling the office. So the kids finished their work but they were yelling? Is that all? What other behaviors were taking place? Were there fights? Were you threatened? Did anyone leave the class? Yelling is bad but there are worse things that could have happened. The regular teacher may never need to call the office or perhaps they do every day. Yelling is disruptive but remember they did do their work. Kids will act up if there is nothing to do. (That's true with most classes - regular and special ed.) In high school it might be taking out cell phones, in middle school it might be yelling, and in primary grades, it might be running around the classroom or throwing crayons. In your case you got yelling as the "I finished my work and don't know what to do" behavior. There are ways to deal with loud classes.

    When you are a sub you are on your own. Call the administration when it is a safety issue, that is perhaps why the administrator was annoyed.

    The administrator may be fed up with the behavior in the class and you got the brunt of their frustration. You just don't know.

    I learned to take responsibility for classes even when it was not my fault that students had no prior management, had been taught poor behaviors by regular teacher, or didn't care. It's not fair or right but it's what I learned to do over time. It's a better way to earn favor with hard classes and administrators. The administrator may not be in that class enough to see how hard it is. Don't show weakness.
     
  13. El sol

    El sol Rookie

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    Oct 19, 2014

    It stills seems unclear. Was there a sub the day before you? And, if so, didn't that sub also got the rest of the week assigned? I don't understand why you would talk about a previous day's work unless it was also left for a sub.

    Just brush it off and grow from it.
     

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