Removal of Salary Schedule?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by bandnerdtx, Jul 13, 2012.

  1. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 13, 2012

    Several districts in my area, including my own, are getting rid of a set salary schedule and moving to something else that I really don't understand.

    The new system supposedly normalizes salaries and gives us a standard when increasing salaries. There is no rhyme or reason when people move up on a step (or get a M.Ed/Ph.D). There will no longer be a salary schedule and if you want to know what a teacher gets paid, you'll have to call HR. They say it shouldn't affect current employees too much, but new hires will be impacted more. They also said when the state mandates raises, it is going to be more fair and equitable so that ALL can see the raise.

    One of our school board members said that there are no negative repercussions to this, and that it's mainly to get the salary schedule on a predictable schedule. It was sporadic - there was nothing to determine how much each step would be. Some years, you'd get a 500 dollar step, and some years it was a 100 step. This is supposed to fix that.

    I don't know. I'm nervous about the whole thing. Is anyone else in a district that uses this system? This year, 3 of the major districts around here are moving to it, maybe more.
     
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  3. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2012

    So you won't move up a step every year you work?

    Are they looking at percentage raises?
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Jul 13, 2012

    In four years, I've never had a raise :( In fact, I make less now than I did my first semester teaching!

    We used to have steps. There is still a schedule posted for it. But we never see the increases. Each year, right before increases are to take place, they change the schedule and knock everyone back down a level.
     
  5. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Jul 13, 2012

    No, Mopar, from what I understand, we won't automatically move up each year. IF we get a raise that year, it will be applied equally to all of us where we are starting this year. So after 20 years with a Master's, I now make about $55,000. The only way I'll get an increase from here on out is if every teacher gets a raise. So if they decide that we'll all get a 3% increase in salary, I'll earn 3% more of that $55,000 whereas a new teacher would earn 3% more of their $45,000 salary. (And don't even get me started on the fact that after 20 years and an advanced degree I only earn $10,000 more a year...)

    They *say* it's more equitable this way.
     
  6. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 13, 2012

    I think our state is going to move to something like that. In a couple of years we are supposed to go to minimum salary schedule which is supposed to be supplemented with merit pay based on test scores. Should be interesting.
     
  7. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2012

    This sounds like what the private sector does. It's almost like everyone is already in longevity.
     
  8. catlover

    catlover Rookie

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    Jul 13, 2012

    My district (in the Houston area) is doing the same, as is my husband's district. So we researched the idea of salary ranges as applied to teachers.

    What we're seeing on the web is that a salary range system is supposed to make annual increases more flexible. For example, annual increases could be any amount, not a fixed amount (like 3%). Also, the size of your annual increase could be different from someone else who has the same degree and same number of years experience -- for example, based on your evaluations.

    I can't post links because I'm a new member, but you can read a summary of the difference between step and range systems if you do a web search for the following article title, then go down to the headings for Scales and then The Movement Towards "Bands":

    "The Faculty Salary Challenge: Not Just How Much, But How?"

    You can get another good description if you do a web search for the following phrase, and then scroll down in the resulting web page until you find the paragraph that starts with the same words:

    "As with many communities, the community we visited currently uses a "step" system"
     
  9. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jul 13, 2012

    Never heard of this. I don't think my district's doing it as far as I know.
     
  10. sumnerfan

    sumnerfan Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2012

    I've heard our superintendent talk about the movement to this type of pay. I don't like the idea. I worked hard for my Master's degree and would like to be compensated for it. Is this the same type of salary schedule that would allow them to pay more to teachers who teach math and science? I have a huge issue with that idea.
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Jul 13, 2012

    My state has made step pay scales illegal, but that's because they're going to pay for performance. So there is no "schedule" anymore because your raise (if anyone was actually getting one, haha) would be based on your performance. Supposedly, one teacher might get a 300 dollar raise and a "better" teacher might get an 800 dollar raise.
     

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