Reminder to Keep an Eye on Your Debit/Credit Transactions

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Ms. I, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Jan 13, 2015

    My debit card's been in my wallet all along like usual, yet this morning, I noticed a few fraudulent charges, which my bank also noticed quickly & called & emailed me about it. I guess I'm going to the bank today to get my new card w/ new #. How they obtained my # (to create a dummy plastic card), who knows. :mad:
     
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  3. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    That happened to me a few years ago. Someone ordered a bunch of stuff online with my number. I bank and the company and was able to get the charges off my card.
     
  4. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    It is really scary how easy it is for someone to get your bank account information, even if you're careful online. It's really good advice to keep an eye on your statements and also to change your online passwords often (not that I follow my own advice lol!).
     
  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Hackers don't have anything better to do than spend countless hours stealing info. My hubby is not good about being wary about junk email he opens, and he tends to believe it if someone asks for CC info. But the banks are being hacked at an alarming rate, and I am on my third debit card in one year due to this computer fraud. I don't know how to make myself bullet-proof, but I do monitor our transactions online routinely.
     
  6. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Credit card numbers are typically acquired in bulk, typically from Russian blackhat hackers - they tend to deal the most in CC fraud.
     
  7. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Yes, I don't ever leave my card around carelessly nor does anyone other than I have access to my wallet/purse.
     
  8. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    Jan 14, 2015

    Take it from me. They don't need the physical card. The bank pinpointed that mine was taken when I used it at a convenience store. My older niece and I were on our way to pick the younger one from camp. We stopped for bottles of water and a bag of chips. It was a store that had been there for years. A coworkers' account was hacked at a prepay gas pump. I am on my 3rd new card due to shopping at businesses that possibly had data hacked (places like Home Depot). It's far too easy for our information to be taken.
     
  9. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Also, card skimmers are incredibly easy to install and remove - all you do is slide the skimmer right over the reader - it scans your card and gets all of the data (the card #, expiration date, name on the card, and security code). A person could just go to somewhere like a gas station in a state where you have to pump your own gas, place one on the card reader on the pump, then come back the next day, grab the card skimmer, and have potentially hundreds of numbers.

    Here's an article on card skimming if you are interested:
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2469560,00.asp
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Yes, years ago, I read that gas stations are the worst to get your cards' info stolen. Also restaurants in which the waiter takes your card to scan it in which you no longer see what happens when they take it.

    My mom's told me years ago to pay cash for everything, which may help, but since one's card still does't have to be lost/stolen to be "stolen", that's just the advanced ways of these thieves. There also used to be a TV show that shows how thieves do things, so it's a show coming from THEIR perspective...very interesting.
     
  11. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Jan 14, 2015

    We had our card skimmed at a restaurant. We know it was there because it was my husband's card, and that was literally the ONLY place he used it over the course of 3 months. Our entire bank account, over $6,000, was wiped out in a matter of a few hours. We went to the deli for lunch and our card was denied, so we went to the bank immediately and it was just gone. This was on a Friday, and the bank told us they didn't have time to deal with it til Monday. So we were out of luck for the weekend-no money.

    I was so ******, I went on a social media rampage, and within a couple hours had tracked down the a$$hole to a house in Ohio-yes, I had Google Earth pics of his house. I literally cried to the vendors that had been used – just FYI, they are not allowed to give out any information to the person whose card is stolen. Luckily, my hacker used it at a couple of small businesses, and they were very sympathetic and gave up information freely. One gentleman even gave me an IP address. Using the information I gathered, I managed to collect the following information:

    Name
    Address
    Phone numbers
    Email
    Social security number
    Facebook page, with pictures
    Google Earth image of his house
    License plate number
    Landlord’s name, business name, address, and phone – I also talked to the landlord, and coincidentally, this scum was behind on his rent for just about the same amount as what he had hacked me for. His plan, I discovered, was buy items using my card, then return them and pay his rent. The landlord, as it turned out, had his own identity stolen a few months earlier and was very sympathetic to my plight. He was agreeable to helping in any way he could.
    Name and contact information for the County Attorney and Sheriff in Ohio
    Criminal history of the scum, including reports of the times the Sheriff had visited his house in the previous 2 years

    This is a lesson in and of itself-no information is safe, folks, if you’re on the internet. I don’t have special skills when it comes to tracking this kind of information-it just required persistence, creativity, and a few white lies on the phone, and people will give up all kinds of information.

    I plopped all this on the desk of my local sheriff and I thought his eyes were going to bug out of his head. He agreed to contact authorities in Ohio, who then visited the scum’s house AGAIN. Alas, he was able to weasel his way out of this though.

    He blamed his mother. Said he bought her a new laptop and it came loaded with my debit card information. :dizzy:

    We got our money back, eventually. The frustrating part though is that the authorities did nothing about it. Their answer to me was that it was going to keep happening anyway and they didn’t have the resources to do anything about it.
     
  12. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Good info guys! Although I know this already, I need to be more diligent & do the following from now on...

    - pay in cash at a lot more places, especially for gas & dining out
    - use a credit card rather than my debit card for online shopping

    My fraud was at some video game merchant (don't know if it's just an internet OR also a B&M (brick & mortar) merchant) for 3x's of $1, then they tried $50, which was declined by my bank, thank God. It could have been worse. They could have tried something for thousands of dollars.
     
  13. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Just a few months back I had thousands of dollars of fraud on my debit card. No idea how they got the number. This person bought tons of construction stuff. I think I found who did it but the bank didn't care.

    I got my money back so that's the important part, right?. . .
     
  14. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    No wonder people keep stealing credit card numbers...it sounds like nothing will be done to them even if they get caught! It's like free money. What jerks.
     
  15. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Someone used my husband's Paypal account to spend thousands of dollars on iTunes gift cards. He's still trying to work it out.
     
  16. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Yep, my scumball opened a Paypal account too. Paypal was NOT impressed though, and put the ki-bash on that right away. Although, their refund took the longest to come back to me...

    One thing to watch for - one or more very small transactions, like even a few cents. They will test out your number with a small amount, so you aren't as likely to notice, then wait til you have a full account and WHAM.
     
  17. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jan 15, 2015

    Paypal is a bit weird with identity theft.

    Their protection methods can be a double edged sword - sometimes it stops identity theft in progress, other times it thinks good causes (such as fundraisers) are identity theft. It's rather odd. One time a site I used had the donation drive they were doing for charity frozen by paypal because the account had hit a hidden limit in the amount a paypal account can receive in a week.
     
  18. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Paypal is refusing to refund my husband's money and now he has to challenge the charge with his credit card. He's really worried he will never see that money again. Luckily, it won't break us, but I understand how someone living a little more paycheck to paycheck than we do, or without the benefit of family to help, this could be a huge, huge deal!
     
  19. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    My bank refused to authorize a transaction today so I had to call and confirm my identity. I had gone to five stores in one afternoon which is out of the ordinary for me. It took longer to check out since they had to suspend the transaction while I called my bank and that was a hassle, but I'm glad they are monitoring usage.
     
  20. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    My bank no longer used raised numbers, as they are to easy for a server at a restaurant to run a copy. They also advise we use a wallet with metal or magnets in them to keep card scanners from working (scanners crooks use to tap against wallets and purses to electronically grasp numbers from the strip) The sad thing is there is an easy solution to the scanning problem available in Europe...a chip in the card that scrambled the number if pulled unauthorized...congress has to approve the use here and has so far refuses to.

    Glad you caught it in time
     
  21. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Jan 16, 2015

    Yeah, Europe & Asia are like 5-10 years ahead of us in bank account/credit card security.

    Like my debit card literally just got a NFC chip so I can do tap payments (where accepted)
     
  22. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    The card my esposo uses that is attached to his Costa Rican account sends him an email every single time it is charged. Within 15 minutes of the transaction.

    I think that's pretty awesome, albeit annoying if you use it a lot.
     
  23. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Feb 12, 2015

    You're welcome! :)
     
  24. Sam Aye M

    Sam Aye M Mr. Know-It-All

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    Feb 12, 2015

    My credit card that I use for daily expenses sends me a text every time a transaction over $50 occurs. I set that $50 limit, and I'm usually still standing at the counter when I get my text. I tried to set my debit card from another bank to do the same, but it is usually hours later, so that card doesn't get used very much anymore.
     
  25. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

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    I have heard several people say that they saw very SMALL transactions on their cards and then bigger ones all in quick succession. The thieves test it out by charging small amounts then go for a large one. If you see this contact your credit card company immediately.
     

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