reluctant child

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by Robin, Sep 30, 2008.

  1. Robin

    Robin Rookie

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    Sep 30, 2008

    I have a 3 year old boisterous boy, full of life, and energy and ideas of his own. He has recently transitioned from a much slower, more 1 on 1 early head start class where the numbers of children are lower and the staff to child ratio is higher. He spent 6 days in my mixed 3,4,5, classroomprogram and does not want to return. The previous program he was in was much slower paced, only two days a week, with much more one on one attention and encouragement from his teachers. Now he is in the blended 3, 4,5, class and things are very different. 4 days a week. A routinized schedule that follow program mandates, and certain expectations of complying with routines. My little friend is not blending with the routine and getting a lot of redirection away from areas of interest that he would rather engage in. He is a bus kid and busing is not really fun, it's long, uncomfortable and boring. So, he has not been coming to school, because he has told his mom he doesn't like his teacher. So, I am going to have a parent meeting with mom on Friday to discuss the situation and possible ways to problem solve the situation so that our friend will feel more enthusiastic and his attendance will increase as well as his feelings about his school.
     
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  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Oct 1, 2008


    I guess as a Montessori teacher I don't understand why that's such a bad thing. Maybe if you gave him some time to explore the things he likes in an appropriate way it might make it easier on him.

    One of the things I've always tried to do is to make sure that I start with a child where the child is and where the child's interests lie. I can't expect him to come in and be where I want him to be. I understand that you have things you have to do, but can you meet him where he is and start from there? Might make the transition better for him.
     
  4. Robin

    Robin Rookie

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    Oct 7, 2008

    Tracy, you are right. I do believe in starting with where the child is. Our curriculum is to find things that interest the child and offer them in class. Unfortunately, he cannot explore toys during other scheduled times of the day, because there are 20 children in the classroom, so, I guess my question is, what can I do to make school more desirable for him? At the home visit Mom shared what he likes and those things are offered to him. He has an hour of free time where he can make his own decisions about where he wants to play and what he wants to do, but my feeling is that he feels frustrated by the schedule and the inability to set his own tone. He has a short attention span and benefits from a teacher by his side, when that is possible, which isn't always. My thought would be to allow him to have a shorter school week till he matures, but the program does not support that option.
     
  5. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Oct 8, 2008

    Well, I wonder if the program just isn't the right fit for the child? I don't know. I'm used to children being able to explore whatever they want in the classroom when the classroom is available to them, with the exception of our morning meeting time. The rest of the time the child is choosing his own work.

    Is it possible maybe to have him "help you" with some things that are special until he starts to feel more comfortable?
     

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