Relocating for a job (does it go both ways?)

Discussion in 'General Education' started by engineerkyle, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. engineerkyle

    engineerkyle Companion

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    Apr 21, 2012

    Hi All,

    Advisers have told me I could go to a job fair and get hired on the spot, as long as I am willing to move to another state. That makes it sound like there are no jobs in MI but there are in, say, ND.

    Do you suspect that candidates in North Dakota and being told the same thing. You can get a job if you are willing to move to Michigan? After all, a new hire that is willing to pull up stakes should be very pliable to the administration, right?

    EK
     
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  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Apr 21, 2012

    I think anytime you are willing to relocate you open up your possibilities. There might be jobs in your current area, but that doesn't mean they'll be easy to land.
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 21, 2012

    Michigan is one of the absolute toughest markets to find a teaching job in. No one is telling teachers to go there.
    As someone who relocated from MI to NC, they do not say the same thing here. I moved when there was a teacher shortage here (that is no longer the case), but even now people don't really talk about relocating to get jobs.
     
  5. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Apr 21, 2012

    There are jobs in ND, but you have to be willing to live in some pretty remote areas with brutal weather conditions. The Williston area is experiencing a major oil boom and there are an enormous number of jobs open in pretty much every sector. Unfortunately, the infractructure is not there to support all these people, so housing is in very short supply, driving up the cost of rent to NYC levels. Many, many people live in RV's in the Wal-Mart parking lot because there is simply no other place to live.

    The weather in NW North Dakota can be brutal. Temperatures of -50F aren't unheard of in the winter. Imagine a day like that in your RV. Living in that area right now isn't for the faint of heart. If, however, you are up for the adventure, it's beautiful country, and ND is a great state to live in.
     
  6. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    Apr 21, 2012

    MM, my cousin's husband works off shore for a company in the gulf. They live in La. His company sent him to Williston for a few weeks this winter. He's from Southern La. Can you imagine his surprise at the temp's he encountered? He posted pictures on facebook of the porta potty coved in ice. He says there are a lot of jobs and no place to live. (sorry, bout the hijack)

    I relocated and didn't feel I needed to be anymore pliable. I can see why you might think it though. My state still needs teachers and even teachers that get non renewed can still get a teaching job in another district. (Co-worker non renewed has another teaching job within 2 weeks) Some areas of the south don't have the best reputation but I've found the area close to perfection. I absolutely love the school I teach at and the students for the most part WANT to learn. Such a difference from the wealthy district I left to the title 1 school I'm in.
     
  7. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Apr 21, 2012

    haha! Good question! I hope they don't!
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Apr 21, 2012

    And, for the record, I do live in ND. As far as I know, the students here are being encouraged to look for jobs in the more rural counties, but not outside of the state.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Yep, I have a friend who teaches in Williston in elementary ed, which is notoriously the absolute toughest market to get into. She got hired after what she said was a 5 minute phone interview her first year looking after having a negative student teaching experience (she was in my school, her class was ROUGH and she didn't get very good reviews). She said the principal asked her a couple of questions on the phone, basically if she was certified and willing to teach in the area, and then asked her to come to the school for a "tour"- after showing her around a bit she was offered a contract. Her school alone is supposedly hiring 30 new teachers for this upcoming school year.

    To answer the original question, no I don't think places in the supposed "better areas" are really telling candidates to look in other "worse area" states. There really are parts of my state that need teachers- namely rural areas. There is some competition there in your really saturated areas like el ed or hs english/ss but overall the markets are good and even asking for some certification areas. So the advice I generally hear in my state is to look rural, not to look in another state. I went to a job fair in March and the notoriously bad "inner city" district in denver had HUNDREDS of candidates waiting in line to talk to two representatives. Schools with much better reputations but far outside the city limits or on the far east side of the state couldn't get anyone to stop by their tables.
     
  10. teachart

    teachart Comrade

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    Apr 22, 2012

    No one is telling anyone to come to MI for a job :)
    I don't know why your advisers are telling you that you will get hired on the spot. (We must be at different universities.) I'd be wary if you are - make it contingent upon visiting the school.
    My advisers are saying we should look out of state, but truth is the market is tough every where. There are smaller applicant pools in some states and especially in rural districts (maybe even urban, DPS has quite a few job listings last I checked and I even applied for one of their non-credentialed summer jobs.) My Aunt (retired teacher and now mentor for the Ohio Intergenerational Mentorship Program) suggests looking for districts that are doing buyouts. Considering Michigan already did this within the last few years, I wouldn't get your hopes up.

    If you do want to get hired in Michigan, I'd look for a long sub term placement.
     
  11. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    Apr 22, 2012

    I went to a job fair last April in Michigan and saw districts from AZ hiring on the spot. Another student teacher in my seminar class accepted one of those jobs, that day.

    I was one who WANTED to move out of state, and did get a job in another state after applying to hundreds. So it wasn't like just because I looked out of state I automatically got a job. It's still tough. However, of the people I know that graduated with me last year and stayed in Michigan ONE has a full time teaching job, at a private school. Some are subbing, some working random jobs... not full time teaching. It is simply extremely competitive for very few jobs in MI. Even in rural districts... my friend applied for a job wayyy up north and there were over 200 applicants. Even my cooperating teacher during student teaching got laid off because she wasn't tenured.

    Luckily, I was prepared for the reality of this all through college so I felt prepared to compete in this market. But no, I don't think anyone is telling people to look in Michigan for jobs... there are very few out there.
     
  12. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 22, 2012

    And, unfortunately, all the teachers who moved out of state within the last 10 years are now trying to relocate back. That makes the market that much harder, since we all have experience. :sorry:
    I graduated in 2006 and left MI in 2007. Recently, I applied for several positions before I said anything to anyone. I finally told my best friend (who teaches in VA), and she is also looking back in MI. I know of at least 1 other person that graduated with me and is now looking to return.
    I had exactly 1 interview in 2 hiring seasons in MI after college- and it was with the district that I graduated from. Of the positions that I have applied for now, I got a call on Tuesday after I applied the previous Friday. That is the only position that I have applied for that has conducted any interviews. So my experience is already working for me. I unfortunately did not get the job, but they interviewed over 100 people :eek:, so I am not super surprised. I am impatiently waiting for the district I graduated from (and subbed for for a year and a half) to call in their interviews. Unfortunately, they are waiting until May.:down:
     
  13. teachin4ever

    teachin4ever Cohort

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    Apr 22, 2012

    It's possible to find a teaching job in MI, but it'll be tough, and take a lot of hard work and persistence on your part.

    I got my first teaching job four years ago in MI. I was subbing for a year and started looking at private and charter schools. My first teaching job was at a Catholic school and I worked there for three years. I ended up leaving the school (loooong story) and spend the entire summer updating my resume, fixing up my portfolio, and sending literally HUNDREDS of emails to principals in my area. I applied to every school that was hiring and even schools that weren't. I ended up getting a call for an interview in a district about 40 min. from my house. The principal told me the ONLY reason he called me is because I had emailed him my resume and cover letter. He said there were over 200 applicants that had applied for my position but because he personally received my information, he went ahead and scheduled an interview. I ended up getting the job and I absolutely love it.

    So it is possible to get a job in MI. You just have to work really hard, be incredibly persistent, and be willing to start off at a school that may not be ideal in order to get experience.

    Good luck!!
     

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