Recording Informal Observations

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by mcangel, Aug 13, 2007.

  1. mcangel

    mcangel Rookie

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    Aug 13, 2007

    One of the things that I noticed is that when it comes to entering comments and grades on report cards is that not only are tests and paper assessments considered, but also informal observations (embedded assessments) may be included as well. However, I neglect to write down these observations and really wish that I had them during parent conferences to serve as on-going snapshots of their child, or to confirm my reason for a particular grade. What are some ways that you record your observations? Some have used journals, but I know that I can't keep up with that. Any ideas or tips welcomed :)
     
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  3. annafish

    annafish Companion

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    Aug 13, 2007

    Post It notes. I write down things as a I see them and have a file folder on each child where I stick them. For report cards or conferences I can take out the folder to use. Does that make sense? I guess it's hard to describe the system. I also use it to record guided reading observations.
     
  4. mcangel

    mcangel Rookie

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    Aug 14, 2007

    Makes plenty of sense, and it's simple. Thanks!
     
  5. sundayn

    sundayn Rookie

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    Aug 26, 2007

    Peel and stick labels. Have a sheet on a clipboard. Write the student's name on the label with what you observed. I have a binder with tabs for each student. I place a piece of cardstock behind the tab to stick the label observations. Great for conferences and report cards.
     
  6. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Aug 26, 2007

    I have a clipboard, and I have made a chart that has each child's name and a space to write a comment. It is very short. About once a week, when the kids are working independently, reading silently, or doing group work, I will pull out the clipboard and make a short comment about what each child is doing. It takes me about 5 minutes.
     
  7. lwteacher

    lwteacher Rookie

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    Aug 29, 2007

    Funny you mention this, as we just had a workshop today and this was talked about. We were given a sheet that had boxes-5 boxes by 6 boxes I believe. Our facilitator told us as she walks around the room, she writes the name of a student in the corner and jots down observations or things she conferenced with the student about. She keeps them in a binder and can look back whenever she needs. You could also keep one of these sheets for each student, and a binder holding all. Date each time you make an entry.
     
  8. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 30, 2007

    I bought an observation board and cards from really good stuff. I love it. The cards are big enough to write quite a bit and they are self-sticking.
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Sep 1, 2007

    We just had a workshop on a new way of recording information called "Learning Stories." This is a way of sharing observations with the parents and the student.

    You do some informal observation, preferably at a time when the kids have some cooperative activity, choice time, art, etc.- not direct instruction.

    You would make a title for the story beginning with the child's name... "Katie and the ----"

    Then, you describe what happened. You document what she is doing, who she is with, what you see.

    Then, you adress the child, "Katie, when you were ---- you were demonstrating..."

    The next paragraph, is for the parents, and you describe how the activity related to her learning, next steps, etc.

    Finally, you send it home and the parent writes comments. The ones we saw had photos, but you wouldn't have to. They were done with pre-school, but our school wants us all to try one, no matter what level we teach. There was an example of a chemistry class, so it can work for any level.
     

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