Reality/Fantasy

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Zelda~*, Aug 25, 2009.

  1. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 25, 2009

    I have a first grader who seems utterly unable to distinguish reality from fantasy. I'm thinking this will be an IEP goal this year.

    He's a great kiddo, he's funny, wanting to learn, etc. But boy, this worries me no end. For example, he was telling me a wild tale about killer bugs and told me that I was there. I very genly told him that I didn't remember any of that and perhaps it had been a "dream".

    He shook his head and insisted it "was real". :unsure: This is only one example out of many. Also, when doing a DRA he was asked "Can a rabbit sing?" He said, "Yes. You just can't understand what they're saying."

    I want to help him out of these worries/thoughts without being hard-headed and cruel. I've currenly just been listening to him and saying "Hmmm." and "Huh!" and "I did not know that." and "Is that so?" a lot.

    Any suggestions?
     
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  3. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

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    Aug 25, 2009

    Be Honest With Him Zelda About What Happens.

    Zelda,

    You need to be honest and concrete with him. I would share some of these things that he tells you with the psychologist as much as possible, keep a journal of his "wild stories" and try to document when these occur the most by keeping data. Find out what triggers him to ask these questions and forget asking him, "Why are you asking me these questions?" That will not answer his questions. You should be realistic and concrete as much as possible. I hope these suggestions have been helpful.
     
  4. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 25, 2009

    Thank you for the suggestions. :) I am documenting these stories.

    He is currently identified as being ED. He talks about ghosts and other things trying to hurt him often---I am currently unsure if he actually sees/hears things that are not there yet.

    He doesn't really have questions---he just says things that are off the wall like "If we tell anyone about the color of this marker the world will be in danger." or "That lion tried to bite me and I broke it's neck" etc.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 25, 2009

    You should try to find out what triggers them.

    When I was in HS, one of the kids in my homeroom and adaptive PE class was like that, he had Asperger's and Tourette's. He was nice, but he was a bit odd sometimes. The sped history teacher had to restrain him once when he was unable to determine reality from fantasy.

    The sped teacher, whenever she would hear him say things like that, would repeat what he said back to him, and ask him if it made sense (if he said yes, she would tell him that it did not, because it was not real/true). It seemed to work rather well for him.
     
  6. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Aug 26, 2009

    Thank you! :)

    I will try that---he's a great kid, and learning by leaps and bounds---but I don't want to drop the ball on this issue.

    Thanks again!
     
  7. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 26, 2009

    No problem, it just seems like repeating what they say back to them can help.

    But sometimes (in the case of this student) they can become highly irritated when you challenge what they are saying, but you have to persevere even if they are screaming at you.

    Sometimes bringing them aside and asking them what is wrong can help too
     

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