Reading

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by JessieCobb, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    Jun 21, 2016

    I want to incorporate learning centers somehow during my reading block. In my classroom we have the Oklahoma Reading Street series. We get an hour and a half for our reading block. I do incorporate a Drop Everything & Read the last 20 minutes of the day that is not included in my reading block time. I've looked up the Daily 5, and I like it, but I am having a hard time understanding it /making it work with my basal. Also, I don't have iPads/listening devices/ etc.
    Does anyone use centers in their 3rd grade classroom with a basal reader? What is your schedule like? Where can I find the resources? Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  4. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    To be honest we don't have any type of model I'm assuming. No one has told me otherwise. The reason we have the hour and a half time is for our pull- out kids. My school is very small, struggling, and no organization. That sounds horrible but its the truth.
    So I'm still needing help coming up with centers or some sort of alternative to daily 5.
     
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  5. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  6. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    While I haven't done centers, and I teach fourth grade, I'd consider putting in some time that is purely independent reading with no major strings attached outside of perhaps noting when they are finishing with books, and perhaps occasionally writing to you about the books. If they're having to complete an assignment along with their IR every day, they'll see it more as an assignment, and then the love of reading and growth will be much more temporary and won't drive as much IR outside of school, either. The Book Whisperer has been eye opening to me, and I'd highly suggest it!
     
  7. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  8. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    If you have time this summer, see if you can buy or check out the book - it addresses much of this! As I read, and was reflecting on my first two full years, what I found is that the so-called "accountability" was basically something that my already-"wild"-readers would finish and do well, and my readers who were developing found themselves spending more time on that than reading (which really is what will help them grow much more than the writing about it), or didn't grow as much of a love of reading because of that extra "assigned" piece, even though you and I both would be meaning it to try to make sure they're doing their best.

    What Donalyn Miller suggests (author of the book) is that they are doing independent reading every day in class, and that yes, they'll write a response a week or so to you (i.e. perhaps a brief letter telling you about what they're reading or their thoughts, excitements, sadness over a book, etc...), perhaps less for 3rd grade, and they'll keep track of when they start/finish a full book along with a couple other 2-second things.

    The accountability comes in during your conferences with each student, their writing to you every week or two weeks, and with the fact that they are finishing books. You'll know a kid isn't reading if you notice they haven't finished their book over the course of 3 weeks. You'll know if you sit down to chat with them and they don't have much to share about what they're reading. I was worried about this just as much as you are, but then realized, after reading the book, that there were better ways and ways that will support all learners, and not maintain the status quo.

    My goal this year is to provide a minimum of 15-20 minutes each day for independent reading in class, during which they won't be doing any writing or other work except perhaps discussing with classmates to help find other books to read in the class library.
     
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  9. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    These are great! Thank you so much. I feel so at a loss when it comes to helping struggling readers. This past year was my first year teaching and the more I research, the more I feel like I could have done things better last year!
    Do you have a certain schedule you do with these centers? Maybe rotating throughout the week and have the students make sure they have been to each center? How would you hold them accountable/make sure they are doing what they are supposed to? Again thank you so much!
     
  10. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    Our school pushes AR very hard! And while I like AR, I also feel like it makes students hate reading in the long run! I make sure my students are reading on their level and they get to read whatever they choose. I am thinking about making them fill out cards after each book that give a brief summary. That way I can still hold them accountable while they re still reading what they want.
     
  11. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  12. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    Yes it is!
     
  13. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  14. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Intermediate here uses it completely, as well. Given that that isn't likely to change, my thought was to continue to use it, but with the thought in mind that if I think it's actively discouraging a kid, that I will not have them use it for a while. Since all our students use it correctly, it does provide a useful "quick check" (though again, the responses/conferences should do that this year), and I like that it tracks the number of words read, too...one of my favorite features that I found last year, in fact. I've read that 250K-300K is about a 4th grade expectation, which I upped to about 350K-400K in my mind given the set of students and the other numbers likely being a bare minimum, which gave me a general idea of who needed to read quite a bit more. The kids had a blast tracking our class minutes and books read, even setting goals along the way! TL;DR: I'm not a huge fan of AR, but think it has many useful features and will use it with some caveats in mind this year.
     
  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  16. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    When I read something like this, I am so thankful that I teach where I do. If my P or VP walked in when everyone was reading, they would, in all likelihood, approach more than one of the students to talk to them about their books. The value wouldn't be questioned--at all.

    Edited to add--this isn't just my school, it is the culture of education here. We know what we need to teach, but have complete freedom to cover that any way we wish. We have fought long and hard over many years to retain the freedom of our professional judgement.
     
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  17. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Ditto leaborb192
    Listening to reading can also be your read aloud.
    Mini lessons are often my basel lessons. I often divide one basel lesson into 2-4 mini lessons.
    Meet with the teacher may also be a basel lesson. so can your individual conferences.
     
  18. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    This post gave me some great ideas! :)
     
  19. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    This all breaks my heart. Sometimes it's so hard to be a teacher - to know what kids need, and then to be told you have to do it another way that actively goes against what you're trying to accomplish.
     
  20. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  21. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  22. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    What do you mean you divide one basal lesson into 2-4 mini lessons? I'm thinking of our stories, which are intended to be read together with stopping points for teacher questions. Do you read the story in parts? Or, are you splitting up other lesson components?
     
  23. Rabbitt

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    I'd read the story in listening to reading or mini lesson or morning meeting. I'd have other components such as writing, grammar, literature components, etc in small groups or additional mini lessons and small groups. Phonics I pre-record on the i-pads for word work using educreations.
     
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  24. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    It takes me about 8 weeks to teach Daily 5 and build stamina. After that, it looks something like this...
    Morning meeting 8:30-9:00 which includes a focus lesson
    9:00-9:20 Daily 5 round
    9:20-9:30 Focus lesson
    9:30-10:00 special (gym, music, art, guidance, library, tech)
    10:00-10:20 Daily 5 round
    10:20-10:30 Focus Lesson
    10:30-10:50 Daily 5 round
    10:50-11:00 Focus Lesson
    11:00-11:20 Daily 5 round
    11:20-12:00 lunch and recess
    12:00-12:50 Math
    12:50-1:20 Special
    1:20-1:30 Math facts
    1:30-1:50 recess
    1:50-2:20 Writers workshop
    2:20-2:40 Daily 5 round usually work on writing as it followers writers workshop
    2:40-3:20 Science/social studies (ELA covers much of the text)
    3:30 dismiss

    Each year I try for 20 minute intervals. I like that because even if we get off time, 15 minute intervals are still sufficient.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2016
  25. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Wow! You have a lot of time to focus on ELA! We less than two hours for reading and writing.
     
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  26. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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  27. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    You can cut out focus lessons Daily 5 rounds, The new book now suggests 3 rounds a day but I still find that if I can get in 5, the kids are better off in all subject areas.

    Can you incorporate some ELA into science and social studies? A lot of our ELA is also science and social studies based. Writing workshop incorporates research and opinion writing, text features, and timelines. Nearly all of our non-fiction readings are based on science and social studies concepts. Actually, even fiction.
     
  28. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Yes...with one special fit in.
    Yes...ELA is all focus lessons, small groups, individual conferences, and Daily 5. Although we have an intervention coach, at times I have an intervention during small group too. Or assessments...PALS, Aims, and F & P.
     
  29. otterpop

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    Yeah, I incorporate a lot of reading into my social studies time. I wish I could teach social studies maybe 3 days a week instead of 5, and do an intervention block in the other two.

    Actually, thinking about it now... I bet I could do that. Get students started on working independently during social studies and then pull a few students for more reading practice. The only problem is, we team teach, so I can only give that extra instruction to my homeroom.
     
  30. Leaborb192

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  31. Rabbitt

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    The above was grade 2. Grade 1 worked even better but took about 12 weeks to estabish. I follow the Daily 5 book to a tee and am patient on the stamina building. I teach the kids to be independent and solve their own problems. When it breaks down, I reteach the expectation either in a focus lesson or morning meeting. I will have individual students stay in for recess for 3 minutes to demonstrate the right way to read to self ( or whatever broke down). If several are off task, I stop and discuss what's right and what's not at the moment. The kids don't like to stop so they are content.
     
  32. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    This gives me so much hope for my coming year. I just started reading Daily 5 and all I can think is, "Wow, it must be nice to have such independent students, but there is NO WAY THIS WORKS THIS WELL." So I'm glad to hear someone actually has a lot of success with building stamina and independence in such young grades. (Sorry, off topic from the thread, but I had to comment!)
     
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  33. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    It t
    You truly can. You have to be committed and understand that stamina sometimes is a step backwards. Watch Daily 5 videos that came with your book or youtube might have them.

    You will have to think hard about those who do not build the best stamina. I've had kids do 2 ten minute rounds while the others did the 20. The next round, he/she did the same two for 10 minutes each.

    Kids who cannot stay in one spot, have taped boxes on the floor. I just read how one student sat it a laundry basket while working and it worked. I had a student who functioned better standing all morning! She read standing up. Word work standing up.
     
  34. JessieCobb

    JessieCobb Rookie

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    I've been gone quite a while! lol!
    You said you can track books read and class minutes? I'd LOVE to do that with my class next year. Is this a feature on the Accelerated Reader program?
     
  35. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    You can't track minutes using AR, but it does track the number of words read in total, as well as the number of books (the latter of which would be simple to keep track of regardless of program).
     
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