Reading Units

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by KAgrade2, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. KAgrade2

    KAgrade2 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2010

    The school that I'm at does not use basal readers. I am very happy about this; however, I am trying to map out a rough idea of my curriculum. Since this is my first year, I am having some difficulty. I figured that I would start the year out with friendship (use Frog and Toad). Next, I thought about family. Since I am able to use any books, does anyone have a reading unit idea and/or great book idea?
     
  2.  
  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,950
    Likes Received:
    2,105

    Aug 8, 2010

    I wouldn't do themes in reading in grade 2- I'd do units of study as per reading workshop philosophy. Units such as 'Building a Reading Life/Expectations of Reading Workshop', 'Decoding Strategies',Elements of Story, Character Studies, 'Paying Attention to Punctuation', 'Fluency', Nonfiction Reading, Author Studies...

    Look at the overview here:

    http://www.unitsofstudy.com/teachingReading/default.asp

    It's a grade 3-5 resource but it gives an idea of what your year could look like.
     
  4. queenie

    queenie Groupie

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2008
    Messages:
    1,392
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2010

    Check out this website for some ideas: http://www.thevirtualvine.com/themes&units.html

    We use Harcourt and our basal is divided into themes: Being Me, Helping Hands, Our World, Imagine That, Neighborhood News, Travel Time.

    Even though you aren't using a basal anymore, could you get some ideas from the old basals as to themes to use and corresponding stories?

    Also, are there themes that would coincide with the Science, Social Studies, or Math curriculum so that you could kill two birds with one stone, so to speak?

    I was wondering- when you teach without basals, do you have one copy of the stories and read them to the children or do you have multiple copies and do group studies around them?
     
  5. KAgrade2

    KAgrade2 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 8, 2010

    Since I teach in a private school, I am able to do a lot more than public schools allow. Integrating reading with math, health, bible, language, etc. is a wonderful idea. The only thing is that since I am a first year teacher, I am not familiar with a lot of 2nd grade cross curricular books. If anyone has book suggestions that would be wonderful.

    As far as reading to the students or grouping them together... For the first few weeks, I intend on reading to the students. This is until I know each child and his/her abilities. Later, I do intend on having a few copies of each book. I am going to try and establish centers (comprehension, fluency, sequencing, etc) about the book. Another idea is to have listening centers or find a audio version of the book.
     
  6. JoviHawk

    JoviHawk Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2009
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 4, 2010

    How in the world do they expect a new teacher to effectively teach kids how to read without a reading curriculum? That is the craziest thing I've ever heard!
     
  7. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    968
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 5, 2010

    You should go off the state standards (even though it is a private school). I don't use the basal, ever. It's not very effective for a large range of readers. It does not allow for much differentiation, so it's great that you get a chance to create your own reading instruction.

    It sounds like you also do not have books for guided reading. As it gets to be VERY expensive to buy six copies of every book, I would recommend readingatoz.com. It is a much cheaper investment. These have prepared lesson plans if you are still having trouble creating your own reading lessons. They are also leveled, so you can find texts that are at each group's instructional level. I also love them because they allow me to find nonfiction texts that go along with our social studies and science curriculums. One piece of advice: make sure that students get a good mix of fiction and nonfiction. My first year I rarely did nonfiction with my students. It's very important for them to experience both types of writing! Also, keep an eye out on Scholastic book orders for $1 books that you can buy for a reading group.

    And just my two cents... I think reading to them is a great idea! It gives you the opportunity to model reading strategies. However, during those weeks the students really need to be doing some reading too!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Kelster95,
  2. ally06
Total: 297 (members: 2, guests: 281, robots: 14)
test