Reading Strategies

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Morgan_Mac, Dec 3, 2015.

  1. Morgan_Mac

    Morgan_Mac Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 3, 2015

    I am currently teaching a resource reading course. One of the classes I have is very difficult, very talkative and disrespectful to one another. I would like to read novels aloud with them but when they come together as a class it is very difficult. Today I told them to read independently and I got complaints and lots of questions about the story from about half of the class while the other half read silently and complained when the others would ask questions and disturb them.

    How can I teach these students while keeping them all at ease? any suggestions?
     
  2.  
  3. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2010
    Messages:
    1,560
    Likes Received:
    737

    Dec 3, 2015

    I taught a class like this one year and it was HARD. Especially since the curriculum was unbelievably, horrendously, ridiculously bad. But I did find a few things that worked, somewhat at least...
    1) Popcorn Reading: I didn't use this strategy before teaching this class, and wouldn't use it much in another setting, but my kids liked being able to pick the next person to read and it kept them paying attention, at least somewhat.
    2) Reader's Theater: this would be harder with novels (we weren't allowed to use novels...), but you could do it with a novel, having a narrator read the narration and pick readers for the characters. Some kids loved getting into character, using voices, making sound effects, etc., and the other kids loved hearing them "perform."
    Those were my best strategies, as I recall...I've tried to block most of that year out of my memory. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger...
     
  4. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,418
    Likes Received:
    1,172

    Dec 3, 2015

    I'm not sure what level you're at - but another thought, in addition to the ones mentioned above, would be to do some cloze reading at times / at first, reading it out loud yourself as they follow along, stopping here and there for them to fill in the word (to keep them accountable for reading with you). Perhaps even mixing in a few different strategies (cloze reading a part, then asking them to independently read another part with a specific purpose in mind) might keep them engaged more due to the extra bit of variety.
     
  5. Sarahhoffman

    Sarahhoffman New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 4, 2015

    First of all you should try to study all students. You should try to study their characteristics ,behavior and all. through the good teaching you can handle the students. You should give chance to all students to read books. You can read this type books outside of classroom. so all students should get more concentration on that.
     
  6. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,752
    Likes Received:
    217

    Dec 4, 2015

    What grade level(s)?
     
  7. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2015
    Messages:
    1,348
    Likes Received:
    834

    Dec 4, 2015

    Sometimes when facing a class like that, I'd always wonder what I'm doing wrong. Although there's always room for improvement, if it is just an individual class, then perhaps it's not the teacher but the students who need improvement. At a workshop a few years ago, research was mentioned that the key problem with a class like this is that there are several students experiencing behavioral difficulties grouped together in the class. The behavior seems to bounce off these students, and several students misbehaving becomes more difficult to manage than just one. For students exhibiting such learned misbehaviors, often the situation can't change overnight, but sometimes the best approach, I've found, is to be firm with what rules and procedures are already in place and bring the class up to those procedures rather than condescending to where the class is. My favorite response to a situation is a "whenever" message; "whenever we are quiet during class, it's easier to learn." If a discussion can develop about expected behavior, I try to encourage the students to develop input on how they should behave; (I figure I have 2 ears and only 1 mouth, so listening is often more important than what I say).

    I also wonder, if the class likes to talk, perhaps a good choice for a novel is one that would invoke discussion. I think I would even allow discussion to go a bit longer than planned, to promote more interest in further reading through the book, and then catch up either by me reading aloud one day or by assigning homework.
     
  8. Morgan_Mac

    Morgan_Mac Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 17, 2015

    Thank you all for your feedback. This class is 7th grade, with a majority of the class being boys.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ready2learn
Total: 413 (members: 3, guests: 390, robots: 20)
test