Reading & Science

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teachbugz, Jan 28, 2009.

  1. teachbugz

    teachbugz Rookie

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    Jan 28, 2009

    1-28-09

    Soon I hope to become a science teacher at the middle or high school level. I would like to teach Biology or Integrated Science.
    I am wondering do science teachers have their students read the material in class out loud and have discussions or do they allow students to read the material without discussing what has been read? What suggestions would recommend for helping ELL?
    How you do motivate your students?

    Since I have been subbing, it seems to me that reading in class has been become a thing of the past. Most students are interested in answering science questions without understanding what they have read. Students must be able to understand the vocabulary, know some basic math, and interpret graphs and other technical material.
    Thanks.
     
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  3. fuzed_fizzion

    fuzed_fizzion Comrade

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    Jan 28, 2009

    I teach middle school science, but I think part of what factors into students reading in class or out of class is the amount of texts you have available. We only have a class set for each of the science texts; therefore, the books do not go home with a student. We do several different things to learn how to get information from text. I don't expect students to just be able to listen as it is read aloud. We do discuss what has been read. I use graphic organizers, retrieval charts, etc., to help students reatin information from reading. My ELL students and others who struggle with learning for various reasons benefit greatly from using graphic organizers and modeling.

    I motivate my students by providing some kind of inquiry activity at the beginning of a new concept. Students become interested in the how or why and I can use it for students to refer to as we discuss the concept. I also challenge them. Book work every day is boring for anyone.
     
  4. sue35

    sue35 Habitué

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    Jan 28, 2009

    I have them all read it aloud and then we take notes/discuss what we read. I find that even if they were to take the book home, they won't do the reading. I also do an activity to get them interested.
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jan 28, 2009

    You could always use the jigsaw activity. Each group of students gets a piece of the chapter to read. After time enough to read and discuss, the class comes back together and each group gives the main points of the part of the chapter they read.
     
  6. teachbugz

    teachbugz Rookie

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    Feb 3, 2009

    2-3-09


    I like the jigsaw activity. This approach seem to get the class involved and enhances learning skills like summarizing, comprehension, and teamwork. Thanks: smalltowngal.

    Graphic organizers, retrieval charts, are excellent ideas especially for ELL. I plan to use analogies and modeling and if possible perform experiments or bring hands-on-materials for visual and tactile learners. Thanks:fuzed fizzion.

    Note taking is a skill that isn't taught in schools today. Graphic organizers, and the like should help kids develop note taking skills which should begin in elementary rather than middle school where the teachers will probably assume most kids know how to take notes. Thanks: sue35.

    teachbugz
     
  7. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Your welcome!
     
  8. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Along with what smalltowngal said, you could also assign each group a section of a chapter. Each group reads the section and works together to come up with a poster/lesson and teach the class their section. I did this one time with my fifth graders (when I taught fifth), and they seemed to really like it and retain the information.

    We would read a section in the science book, but just a section at a time, otherwise it was too much information. We would follow up with some sort of activity. Also, while we read the section, I would make sure we stopped and discussed the section and try to make connections.
     
  9. teachbugz

    teachbugz Rookie

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    Feb 10, 2009

    Thank you Peachyness.
     

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