Reading Program: Reading Street or Journeys?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by tradershez, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. tradershez

    tradershez New Member

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    Aug 14, 2013

    Hello,

    I am an ex-teacher who for very strong reasons has had to bring our daughter home to be schooled. We have been using stereotypical homeschooling curriculum and materials and they are not rigorous enough, they do not have proper scaffolding for teaching writing properly & have are not updated to include technology in the real world, or links to the real world. I really want to provide her with at least the quality that she would be getting from a school.

    I have been studying a number of samples of different language arts and reading programs provided by their publishers. Two of these are Reading Street & Journeys.

    Reading Streets appears to be on steroids and looks very disjointed. I would like to find whether you think this program builds proper scaffolding for the writing process, has any retention for the skills taught and any other thoughts you may have.

    How does this program compare to Journeys. From the sample online, it appears to be concise, clearly written, following one topic at a time compared to a plethora of topics thrown at the student on one page. What are the pros and cons of using this program. Is it 'enough' compared to what Reading Street offers. Does it cover the skills I should be teaching?

    Do you recommend either of these, or any others?

    I appreciate your time.
     
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  3. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Aug 14, 2013

    I have only used Journeys, not Reading Street. I didn't like Journeys because there was absolutely no focus on fiction text. It was all non-fiction. And it was very predictable. The kids had the same activities for each "expedition". I feel like it took the fun out of teaching reading and made it very mundane. However, some may argue that the consistency is good. It's just not my style.
     
  4. kab164

    kab164 Companion

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    Aug 14, 2013

    There is a new requirement that textbook publishers have to use at least 50% nonfiction. While I do not agree with this, our reading scores have gone way up since we got Journeys 3 years ago. We have 80% of grades 2-5 at benchmark with spring Dibels scores and almost 80% in first grade. Our K students are over 80%.
     
  5. Tyler B.

    Tyler B. Groupie

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    Aug 15, 2013

    Unless your daughter has some kind of reading problem, I would steer clear of either of those programs. They seem heavy on skills and short on quantity.

    Subscribe to several magazines that she'll love and put forth a writing project where she will submit content to be published. This will cause her to not only read for pleasure, but also to study the style and content of the non-fiction publication. She'll also need to develop research skills to develop her own articles.

    I'd also have her read for pleasure an appropriate amount of time teach day.

    I'd pick a high interest book that is just out of her reading ability and read it together discussing the ideas and vocabulary.

    For writing, I have her imitate some aspect of the author you are reading together. For example, let's say you are reading something by Beverly Cleary and notice that she has quite vivid verbs of attributions (said words). Have her journal time be to write like Cleary.

    Our district has been doing this for several years with excellent results. For staff development we used Literature Based Writing published by Mt. Hood Press.
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 15, 2013

    I like your ideas, Tyler B.
     
  7. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Aug 15, 2013

    If my P would allow it, I'd send you my Journeys books. I don't think much of them. There is great fiction and non-fiction books free at your library where your daughter can learn way more than most students. I would be more than happy to send you a list.
     
  8. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Aug 16, 2013

    We had 2 teachers who threw a FIT until they got Journeys. Everyone HATED it. Too low level, too cookie-cutter, no challenge for advanced readers. It was awful.
     
  9. BumbleB

    BumbleB Habitué

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    Aug 16, 2013

    Agreed.

    We used Journeys for two years. All of the stuff is now sitting in storage. Very useful purchase right there :rolleyes:
     

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