Reading Groups/Centers

Discussion in 'Second Grade' started by map, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. map

    map Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2007

    My plan is to divide students into groups of 5-6 for reading so I can attempt to individualize the program for each child. I thought I would set up center activities to keep the other students engaged during that time. Is this realistic? Is this the norm or do you teach reading whole group? What types of activities do you have the other groups doing? I am open to any suggestions. Thanks for your time.
     
  2.  
  3. MsX

    MsX Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2007
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2007

    It is definitely not unusual to have centers while meeting with a small reading group. Also, I know some teachers use a Reader's Workshop model, in which a mini-lesson is taught whole group, then the students read independently, respond to what they're reading in some capacity, and re-group for sharing. During the independent time, teachers conference with readers and/or pull small groups for guided reading. This is what I'm planning to use this year. I'm not really explaining it well, but I'm sure if you search this site for Reader's Workshop or do a web search, you'll find lots of information.

    Last year, I did some whole group reading activities (usually dealing with a read aloud), but I also met small leveled groups. I gave students seat work during this time. I did not really LOVE this setup, hence my making changes this year. But centers is another approach that can allow you time to work with a small group, while giving the rest of the class something worthwhile to do.
     
  4. gab

    gab Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2007
    Messages:
    293
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2007

    I do whole group followed by small groups. While groups meet with me my students work through a posted list of 'jobs' which can be anywhere from 4-8 tasks depending on the time available. Job 1 is always buddy reading(this gives me time to prep for groups, about 5 minutes), Job 2 is generally workbook pages pertaining to whole group instruction from the day or previous days, Job 3 AR reading...a book at their level. I prioritize my jobs...reading, practice reading skills, and more reading adding other, also important tasks but those not necessarily needing to be corrected or monitored as often. The rest of the jobs could be: Hwg(Handwriting) Writing activity WC(word card practice) Making Words Math(practice) Otter(math fact practice) Dictionary Skills(alphabetizing, looking for definitions) Social Studies(rereading current themes or looking ahead) BC (book choice including AR at or below level). There are others but I can't think what they are at this time. This works for the most part with the exception of less than independent students and my Title kids who leave for 30 minutes...their tasks can often be completed but sometime need to be modified. Good luck!
     
  5. patti2

    patti2 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    557
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2007

    I am implementing The Daily 5 this year-it sounds like NO prep and the kids are on task practicing reading and writing at their own levels while I pull small groups. I bought the book a few weeks ago and can't wait to see if it works!
     
  6. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 19, 2007

    I think most 1st and 2nd teachers do centers while kids read with you in small groups. I like a variety of centers cuz kids this age get bored and will misbehave if you just have them read read read. So try some variety such as bingo games, magnetic games, flannel board stuff, math manipulatives w/tasks, read and write the room using clipboards, listening post, etc. I bought The Daily 5 too and I agree with it but I will use independent reading and buddy reading at other times. Any word work is a great center. Are you going to do the daily 5 in order like they suggest?
     
  7. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,277
    Likes Received:
    745

    Aug 19, 2007

    Get the Debbie Diller book on Literacy Work Stations.
     
  8. patti2

    patti2 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    557
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 19, 2007

    Pattie-I am going to do the Daily 5-but cut out Listening-I only have time for 4 and they listen to me read each day and others in guided reading. I think that Word Work is where I will stick in a lot of different activities that I actually had in a writing center last year....and I do have games like Hangman, Boggle, Jr. Scrabble and some card games. This is also an area for the pocket chart activities. I hope it works! I used silent reading seperately last year and the kids really liked having that time to themselves! I just need to work on building STAMINA!!!! I thought that was one of the best ideas in the book!
     
  9. MMRbella

    MMRbella Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2007
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 19, 2007

    Not only is it not unusual... it's best practice! :)
     
  10. Lysander

    Lysander Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Messages:
    147
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    I begin my centers about the third week of school. I have my class broken into three groups: Above grade level, on grade level, and below grade level. Obviously, I give them other names (mine are all baseball teams). Each group meets with me for 20 minutes, does a quiet seat assignment for 20 minutes, and does centers for 20 minutes. I have lots of different centers. There are easy medium and difficult centers for spelling, writing and comprehension, plus a listening center and computer center. In spelling, kids can use letter tiles and cards to make spelling words, or use sign language to fingerspell their words, they could also make spelling flashcards using index cards and colored markers. For writing, they could practice penmanship or write a poem or respond to a writing prompt or create a story. In comprehension, they could read a short passage and respond, read the room for different patterns, read directions to complete a project, or read a story of their choosing and write a book report or some other response project (picture, timeline, story map, etc.) The key is introducing each center slowly and giving studnets time to practice it, because they will have to do it completely independently, since you can't be interrupted during small group instruction.
     
  11. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 22, 2007

    If you have a drama center, can someone tell me how it works in your classroom? Where do you find the reader's theatre scripts? Do you do over it with them in guided reading groups first and then move it to the center? I wanted to create a drama center for them to practice their fluency in a fun way.
     
  12. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    1,217
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 23, 2007

    I stopped using centers last year - to me, it's a lot of busy work - for the kids and for me - all that prep... really my focus is on getting them to enjoy reading and become better readers... reading workshop does that... I have more detailed info on my class website under the FOR TEACHERS section (below) as well as some posters I've made to use.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,949
    Likes Received:
    2,101

    Aug 23, 2007

    do a search on amazon for :

    What Are the Other Kids Doing While You Teach Small Groups? (Paperback)
    by Donna Marriott (Author), Joel Kupperstein (Editor), Carolea Williams (Author),
     
  14. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 26, 2007

    I have a puppet theatre I only open at times during the year. I got some simple plays out of our guided reading library and copied a few copies and stapled them together. I have a holder for the puppets and the plays are in little pockets, like a pocket chart. I also have finger puppets for Goldilocks, Red Riding Hood, Billy Goats Gruff, etc.
    It always gets noisy but they are reading to each other. Try it with a story you've read aloud before and then model expectations, but in my experience, that center is noisy, so put it far up in a corner of your room and then only allow 2 or 3 kids at a time. 2 to do show, one to watch it.
     
  15. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2006
    Messages:
    706
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 28, 2007

    Hmmm I'll have to watch out for the drama center then because my room isn't that large, so the centers are fairly close to each other. I might have to replace it with another center. :p
     
  16. Pattie

    Pattie Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2007
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 2, 2007

    Yeah I opened the puppet center this week and it was so noisy! But they all want to go there so as long as they are reading and I can get that noise level down it will always be popular. Good for fluency practice though. :whistle:
     
  17. eswanbury

    eswanbury New Member

    Joined:
    May 2, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2017

    I am currently reorganising my guided reading routine for my Year Two class. Any suggestions on how to run effective sessions?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. vickilyn,
  2. Pi-R-Squared
Total: 433 (members: 2, guests: 409, robots: 22)
test