Reading Aloud

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Miss Kirby, Mar 29, 2008.

  1. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Mar 29, 2008

    I'm taking a masters class called "Advanced Children's Literature". My professors says when you are reading picture books to your class, you are supposed to hold the book facing you, making eye contact with the students while you read. She said do NOT show the pictures, because the pause in between the pages and the kids shouting out, "I can't see!!!" looses comprehension. I understand that she does make a point. But I can't NOT show the pictures! In most books the pictures support what's going on in the story and using the pictures helps the students to understand the vocabulary. She says that you need to reread the books, picture books should never be read just once, and you can show the pictures during the reread. Or, you can put the book out for the students and they will be very eager to look at the book to see the pictures.

    I do this when I'm teaching my unit on Visualization. I read the book without showing the pictures and we talk about our mental images, then another day or afterwards we reread the book. I do reread books when I am using them to teach comprehension, but not every book.

    I am just wondering how to do you read picture books to your students? I notice I hold up the book as I read aloud, and then I move it across so the students can see, and as I'm moving the book I am usually discussing the pictures or thinking aloud - to hold the meaning for them. She says not to hold the book up as you are reading because the back of your head is facing half the class and they can't see anyway. I try to flip sides occasionally so all can see.
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I read the book holding it toward myself, and when I show the pictures to the class, I face the book forward and pan the room with the pictures.

    I see most people hold the book out so the kids CAN see the pictures. My students are older, and sit quietly without seeing the pictures. I do get a bit of the "I can't see!" at the beginning of the year, but I won't show the picture if they are interrupting.
     
  4. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 29, 2008

    I have heard to not show the pictures until after you have read the story too. However, I remember being in school and the teacher doing this. The ONLY thing I was thinking was "when is she going to show me the picture already" to the point of not listening. I read the book with the picture facing them and pan the group when I finish reading while discussing pictures, etc.. as you described. I also read chapter books, this is where they build visualization skills and story comprehension
     
  5. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    When reading chapter books my kids are always like, "Is there a picture? Is there a picture????" Most of the time, there is no picture. And when there is, it's usually tiny and not very interesting, but they are dying to see it.
     
  6. 1gdteach

    1gdteach Companion

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    I have actually never heard not to show the pictures. I always hold the book facing the class and read it. I also move the book from side to side after reading each page and talk about what is going on. I think I had a CT that didn't show the pictures.
     
  7. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I'll add that I teach older kids, and often there is not a picture on every page, even in the "picture books." So I don't see a point in facing the book toward them. With actual picture books, with pictures on each page, I would.
     
  8. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    My prof wanted us to read a page from books that we brought last week, holding the book to ourselves. I was like, "I can't do it! I have to show the pictures!"
     
  9. 1gdteach

    1gdteach Companion

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    I don't think I would be able to do it either. When I took Children's Lit. My Prof. showed us how to hold the book facing the class. You know with our figures out of the way. This was the hardest thing for me to learn, but it was always facing the class.
     
  10. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Plus my chair is on the front-right corner of the carpet area - so when I hold the book in my right hand tilted towards the left, no one is not able to see. haha
     
  11. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    Our librarian reads books like that too. When she read to my kinder students, she would read a page, and then show them the pictures. Part of my likes it, and the other part doesn't. Proabably because I'm not used to that method. As a kid, my teachers read the book so that we could look at the pictures while she was reading. So, that's how I grew up with. When I read books to my kinder kids, I would hold it so they could all see and I would move it while I was reading. I never got the "I can't see" phrase.
     
  12. teacherstudent1

    teacherstudent1 Companion

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    I've done it both ways, so I'm probably no help at all to you!

    I think each has it's advantages, and it may depend on what you are trying to accomplish.

    When I wanted to check pure auditory comprehension, I would read the book without showing the pictures. But I always explained to the students beforehand that I wanted them to picture the story in their minds and told them I would not be revealing the pictures until after we had discussed it. This led to great anticipation in some to see how closely their imagination matched the illustrations.

    If I was reading for vocabulary development, sequencing, or anticipation of coming events, I would show the pictures to aid in initial comprehension.

    I know everyone has their preference based on their opinions. For me it just varies.
     
  13. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Mar 30, 2008

    I'm sorry but I don't agree with your professor. We teach the kids to use the pictures to help them determine the meaning of the words and for my ESL kids, it really helps with their vocab if they can put a picture with the words. I never hear the kids say "I can't see" (my kids are all facing the book) and if I did, I would just hold the picture up again - I don't think it's that disturbing. I will actually hold the picture up and read at the same time if it isn't a long passage.
     
  14. maroki

    maroki Comrade

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    I've never heard not to show the pictures to students. Very interesting.

    I teach at a school with a very high ELL population, and I show the pictures and read at the same time to make sure all students are following along, either using the pictures or just listening to the words. Almost all the books I read have pictures on every page. I sit in front of all the students in the middle of the group. And if/when I pause to ask comprehension or prediction questions, I make sure I keep the picture showing to assist students with their answers. We do read a bit of a chapter book without pictures each afternoon and often do journal activities relating to the chapter book. It is very interesting to see student portrayals of characters/situations as they visualize them from our chapter book.
     
  15. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    I'm glad to know that some of you don't agree because I don't agree either!!
     

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