Reader's Theatre - Harry Potter & the Sorcerer's Stone

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by teacherman1, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Mar 31, 2012

    Harry Potter Video
    Quite an ego booster, wouldn't you think? After all,
    Tiger and Isaiah are only in 2nd grade.

    When we complete the first chapter the boys will each
    get their own DVD copy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2012
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  3. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Mar 31, 2012

    Woo hoo. They read upside down. As a reading specialist for many years, I would love to hear the peer reviewed, longitudinal research behind your "brand." I assume the research has been tested for validity and reliability.
     
  4. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 1, 2012

    I can't offer that research because MIT is conducting it as we speak.
    But I can give you Jacob's parent's response to their son's reading that way.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 1, 2012

    Teacherman...it's clear from your MANY posts on your methods that this is a passion for you. It is not, however, considered best practices nor is there a meta analysis of research on this strategy. Without that, it's just not something that most here are going to try...
     
  6. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 1, 2012

    And that's fine....
    I'm just keeping it out there until it does become best practice. It's getting closer every day...

    I am making progress. Here's a blog out of Canada that came out this week.

    Steve:)
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 1, 2012

    Neither Canada nor blogs dictate what is accepted as best practices. Again, I admire your passion and wish you well.
     
  8. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 9, 2012

    Best Practice

    Good Morning czacza,
    Your last post got me thinking about best practices – both past and present. Here are just a few of what I came up with:

    Education

    2000+ Best practice seems to be testing, testing and more testing – at the expense of real teaching. Even first graders are expected to be “on task” at all times and recess has been banned form many schools. Do you think this will stand the "test of time"?

    1980’s-1990’s - “Whole language” was considered best practice and “Phonics” was practically banned from some classrooms. The debate continues today, but Phonics is winning. I personally feel a combination of both works best.

    1960’s – “New Math” was considered best practice at the expense of traditional mathematics (I was a victim of this one and almost failed Math in 7th grade.)

    In other fields…

    Medicine

    1800’s – Blood letting was considered best practice, with leeches being used for just about any ill under the sun – including smallpox.

    Construction

    1700’s to mid 1970’s – Lead paint was best practice for coating just about anything including houses, furniture and toys. Children in the inner city are still suffering its effects and will be for the foreseeable future.

    1800 – 1970’s – Asbestos was best practice for insulating pipes in homes and on board ships as well as being used in brake shoes on automobiles. Of course, it is still killing people today.

    My point is simply that the concept of best practice is a moving target.

    We learn from our mistakes as our knowledge base expands.
     
  9. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 11, 2012


    Here's another example of "best practice" gone bad.

    When my wife and I were parents of newborns back in the late 70's and early 80's, everyone (including our pediatrician) said that newborns should sleep on their stomachs. That way, if they vomited there would be less chance that the baby could be asphyxiated.

    Today, parents of newborns are being told that laying a baby on its back is one of the greatest contributors to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Here's a link to the SIDS sight.

    Like I said, "best practice" is a moving target.
     
  10. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 23, 2012

    Hi Kat
    As a "reading specialist for many years" I was kinda hoping you would have commented on the other thread where these same 3 boys take their spelling tests inverted - and earn perfect scores.

    Since all three could not read or write in the "normal" way at all before I began working with them, would you be suggesting that they should have been left to languish in SPED for the rest of their academic careers simply because there's no research behind "my brand"?
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Apr 23, 2012

    :beatdeadhorse:
     
  12. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 23, 2012

    :) I was wondering when your horse would show up again.

    But, according to the principal, the teachers and the children's
    parents, the horse is not dead. They say to press on...

    So if my posts bother you so much - or even worse, make you :yawn::yawn::yawn: - maybe you should avoid reading them.:dunno:
     
  13. strepsils

    strepsils Companion

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    Apr 24, 2012

    Teacherman - it's great that you have found something that works for you and helps you achieve what you want.

    However, it can be frustrating to see very similar posts from you on a very regular basis.

    Many people have mentioned the need for research. This is not an unreasonable request.

    As other people have mentioned in other tests - students would also benefit from behavioural optomerists and other specialist referrals as well. Why? Is there a reason that students need the text inverted? There is lots of environmental print that cannot be inverted - is there a way to help students read and comprehend this text? Are there other times when this could be neg atively impacting students that we are not aware of?

    It's great that you have this passion. If you have this passion, be prepared to hear conflicting views and be prepared for people to be frustrated at numerous postings about the same topic.
     
  14. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 24, 2012


    Hi Strepsis,
    I totally agree that research is needed and I've done everything in my power to move it along. But it will take years before it is completed and published. I could easily be dead by that time. (After all, I am 60 this year)

    In the meantime, I'm still helping kids and accumulating "evidence" to back up my claim. Maybe, by repeatedly putting my stuff out there, I can inspire some energetic young educational researchers to begin their own study.

    I apologize to anyone who is frustrated by my posts and suggest that they ignore anything that has my name attached.

    Of course, I hope that doesn't happen.

    Best wishes,
    Teacherman


    PS - The kids don't have any problem with the environmental print. They can train themselves to read it right-side-up the same way teachers train themselves to read their student's papers upside-down:)
     
  15. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Apr 27, 2012

    Good Morning!
    I'd like to thank all of the teachers and principal at the James McGuire elementary school in North Providence, Rhode Island for inviting my wife and I back to give our Print Inversion presentation to the entire faculty. The biggest complaint I've heard so far is that one hour wasn't long enough. My hope is that a few of those teachers might be part of this forum.

    Your input here would be highly appreciated.:)

    Steve
     
  16. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    May 19, 2012

    A response from another forum

    This is a response to a posting on the Discalculia forum I post to. Some of the math teachers on AtoZ might find that forum useful, too.
    Teacherman


    I used to tutor special ed kids in grades K-2nd in reading and math (yes, I was a math tutor... great idea, right?). Anyway, one of my kids, who I will refer to as Bobby, was a first grader labeled by his teacher as possibly dyslexic and "difficult" in the classroom setting due to ADHD. He was impulsive, didn't sit still well, had a hard time staying on task, and was reading 2-3 levels below where he was supposed to be for his age. The levels were kind of arbitrary, but a first grader was expected to be a "level 10" reader. Bobby was reading at level 7-8 depending on the book.

    The first few weeks of working with Bobby were a real challenge. He was a wonderfully sweet little boy, very kind to others, and just an all-around great kid attitude-wise. His behavior left something to be desired, but I understood that it wasn't Bobby's fault - he had ADHD, clearly, so his impulsivity and hyperactive traits weren't his fault. He felt guilty about acting out, but he just didn't have the behavioral maturity or skills to control himself yet.

    Anyway, one day I was working with Bobby and we were both having a rough day. He was not staying on task, kept getting up to walk around and distract the other kids (we tutored in groups in a large classroom setting, with several tutors and kids together in one room), etc. I was at the end of my rope so I told Bobby, "Let's take a 2 minute breather and just let our brains stretch a little, okay?"

    As I was sitting there trying to think of some new way to keep Bobby on task, I looked over at him and saw him focusing intently on the book the little boy across the table from us was reading with his tutor. I knew that the boy across from us was reading level 10 books, so his book was more difficult than any of the books Bobby had been trying to read.

    But Bobby was reading it. Upside down.

    I could see his mouth moving quietly as he read the words to himself, and he was reading it, actually reading it, upside down from across the table. So I got up and picked out a few level 10 books and brought them back and said, "Okay Bobby, let's try a new book, you pick."

    He picked one about trucks and set it down in front of him. I shook my head, flipped the book around so it was upside-down, and said, "Read it like this." He looked at me like I was crazy but I just nodded and said, "Go on, just try, read it upside down."

    And he did. He read that book from cover to cover with only maybe one mistake the entire time, upside down. He couldn't make it through level 8 books right side up without making 2-3 mistakes per page, or losing focus and wandering off half-way through the book. But he could read an on-grade level book all the way through with only one mistake, when he read it upside down.

    One of the single best moments of my entire life was the look on Bobby's face when he realized he had just read a level 10 book all by himself. He gained so much self-confidence because he FINALLY didn't feel stupid. I knew he had felt bad because he knew he was behind the other kids, but now he knew, he really could read. He just read differently.

    I told all of this to his teacher and to the staff teacher who was overseeing my tutoring. I explained the upside down book and how Bobby had read it all the way through, on grade level. They were stunned. They just couldn't believe that he could read that book upside down, so they came over to the table and I had Bobby show them.

    I absolutely believe that some kids are print inverted, and I don't know why. But Bobby was, most definitely. They no longer believed he was dyslexic, because he could clearly read with no problem upside-down. For the rest of the semester he was reading on grade level, some books right-side up, others upside down, depending on the kind of day he was having.

    Reading the books upside-down mitigated some of the symptoms of ADHD he was having too, oddly enough. He was much better at attending to the task when he read upside down than when he read the typical way. It was a really bizarre and interesting thing to witness.
    "The hardest arithmetic to master is that which enables us to count our blessings." - Eric Hoffer
     
  17. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Jun 2, 2012

    Harry Potter Presentation to School and Parents...

    The reader's theatre presentation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone went off very well last night. Unfortunately, the video came out very blurry.

    I'm posting the video, not to show how well the boys did, because you've already seen that. But I'm posting it because two teachers and the principal of the school discuss at length the effect that PI has had on several of their students and on the overall attitude of the staff to this crazy "out of the box" idea.

    So if you are interested in what 3 fellow educators who have seen PI work first hand have to say about it, here's the video. Don't bother watching it - simply listen.

    Steve
     

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