Reader Response

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by hollyb713, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. hollyb713

    hollyb713 Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2010

    Ok. I am a new 3rd grade teacher. I graduated last May and long term subbed for two classes for the 2009-2010 school year. I subbed in the school I was hired at in their 3rd grade classrooms.

    I attended a DRA2 workshop last week. The instructor said that we need to make sure we are using reader response journals in the classroom.

    This is where I am stuck. I can not figure out what to do. I have tried asking my other 3rd grade teachers but they don't know. So I am coming to you guys and hoping that you will have some information for me. Or ideas I can try. Thanks!
     
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  3. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 1, 2010

    Here's what's in our reading response journals (these are all separate sections with notebook paper in folders):

    Books I Have Read
    What I Liked Best About (book title)

    Books I Want to Read

    What Kind of Books I Would Like to Write

    My Favorite Author

    I'll send more info when I get home :)
     
  4. teacherlissa

    teacherlissa Comrade

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    Jun 7, 2010

    A RRJ is where students respond to their independent reading to help their comprehension. It is basically a place where they can "think" about what they read by writing it down. If you google "reading response prompts", you should find lots of ideas on how to begin responses. I usually teach a comprehension strategy (text to self connection, for example) and then send them to their seats to read. They are expected to respond to their book that they read by writing a text to self connection...now...sometimes the book they read does not fit that type of response so they may just write what they learned, do a story map, B-M-E, etc. I have also seen where students write a letter to the teacher and then the teacher writes a letter back asking questions about what they read.
     
  5. **Mrs.A**

    **Mrs.A** Comrade

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    Jun 7, 2010

    You may want to read, Notebook Connections by Aimee Buckner...I'm currently reading it because I want to have my students use a reader's notebook next year.
     
  6. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jun 7, 2010

    This was for 5th, so you'd have to adapt for your needs:

    I posted this after last school year:

    Here is a plan that worked well for my class this past year with a read-aloud:

    Students kept a reader response journal. They wrote in it daily. They each had a copy of the book (they had to buy it). They were not allowed to read ahead or start it on their own.

    First, we previewed the book, the title, the author's name, cover illustration. We predicted what the book was about. I kept a chart on the wall to record predictions. Then, we read the back cover which had a brief summary. The kids wrote in their journals about any questions they had, what they wanted to know. I recorded questions on the chart paper. This was done in 2 sessions.

    I made charts for recording names of characters, descriptions of characters, settings. We kept adding to the charts as we read.
    We updated the predictions chart as we proved or disproved our predictions.

    The next lesson was about how to use the reader response journal. Every day of reading, they dated the page before writing. They were to keep it open while they read, jot down questions they had, things they wondered about, conclusions they could draw, emotional responses, words they did not understand, and (their favorite) figurative language. (Tie in to language arts lesson on figurative language.)

    Each day, the kids read one chapter (they were short, you might have to limit it to a certain number of pages if the chapters are long) silently. They wrote in their response journals.

    Chart paper for vocab words was kept up until the book was done. I listed the words and page numbers for each days reading. Sometimes we projected the definitions before the kids read a chapter. I gave them pages for recording vocab words and definitions - just made it on the computer with appropriate lines. They used the dictionary to find the definitions after reading silently.

    When everyone had finished reading and recording, I read the same chapter aloud while they followed along. This could take place at any time later that day. We stopped and discussed at appropriate spots. We updated charts. Each student shared their favorite parts (which they had noted in their journals), and interesting language (words, phrases, similes, metaphors). This turned out to be their absolute favorite part of the discussions, which surprised me.

    On most days, I posted a question of the day (or two or three) on the board. They had to answer the question in their journals. Their answers had to contain the question and be in complete sentences. I encouraged them to cite the page number and/or a quote from the chapter which helped them.

    Sometimes, I had them draw a particular scene, or even a vivid use of language right in their journals. They loved this, too. You could also ask them to make short comic strips of chapters, write letters to characters giving advice, write 'found' poems using words they found in the novel, compare characters to themselves...... there is no end to all the opportunities!
     
  7. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Jun 7, 2010

    Okay, I managed to find the journals.

    The introduction page, which the students can refer back to, says:

    What makes a good reading response?
    It must be in the form of a letter.

    It must contain the title of the author and book.

    You must write at least two connections (The book reminded me of... or It made me think of...)

    You must ask at least one question.

    Make at least two other comments about the book. You might write about:
    details
    characters
    setting
    problem & solution
    questions you had
    your favorite part
    why you liked/disliked the book

    ____________________________________________________

    The different sections within the journal include:
    Books I Want to Read
    Books I've Read
    Abandoned Books
    My Responses (as listed on intro page)
    Reader's Response Rubric

    You can tailor the journals to reflect your expectations. Hope this helps!
     
  8. MsG

    MsG Companion

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    Jun 7, 2010

    I'm in fourth, but this is easily adaptable to whatever you're doing.

    The first page contains the title and author of the book, along with the date started and level (we use guided reading levels). This page they begin to make daily summaries about what they read - usually about 4-5 sentences (based on ability). These summaries can include things they have questions about, things they liked, or what's going on.

    On the back of the page, they keep track of new vocabulary words. They have a chart they glue in that has the columns: word, word in context, page, what I think it means, definition (from a dictionary).

    The next page is the activity. This goes with whatever topic I am currently teaching. If I'm teaching mini lessons on questioning for reading comprehension, then they have a graphic organizer that they keep track of things they have questions about and how they were able to answer their questions. The activities change every two weeks based on what topic we're covering at that time.

    I grade the entire journal entry for one book. For nonfiction books, they don't do the daily entries, but do complete a graphic organizer of important facts/ideas.
     

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