Read Harry Potter to the class?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by runsw/scissors, Jul 5, 2006.

  1. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,492
    Likes Received:
    100

    Jul 5, 2006

    This has probably been discussed before, but I can't find much. I would like to read the first Harry Potter book to my in-coming fifth graders this fall. I have read all the books and think the first two are pretty safe (i.e. not terribly dark or scary), but I'm biased I love these books. So I need a more objective opinion. Do you think it would be OK to read the first (and maybe second) book aloud to 5th graders? Can you see or have you heard of any parental objections to these two books? I wont read any of the others. I just want to get them hooked and move on to another great book.
     
  2.  
  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    I see you haven't gotten any responses, I just wanted to bump this up because I'm curious myself.
     
  4. frodolass

    frodolass Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    I have wondered this myself. I guess I'd send a note home to parents to make sure it was okay, although I'd hate to see one objector ruin it for the others. Perhaps you could provide an alternate activity for the objectors? I LOVE Harry Potter and have read all the books, but I know a lot of families in my area (Bible belt, conservative) think that the books are evil in some way.
     
  5. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Jul 5, 2006

    I haven't read the books to my class, but have had students in the past tell me that they weren't allowed to watch the movies, so I would be hesitant. It is too bad that the opinions of some may impact on what all are able to enjoy.
     
  6. frodolass

    frodolass Comrade

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    MrsC - My nephews aren't allowed to read the books or watch the movies. My boys can't understand how a book or movie can be "evil."
     
  7. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Messages:
    1,089
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    HP books may get you into a sticky situation. I would get the permission of the parents first. Better safe than :sorry: I have younger brothers, and my mom would have a fit if their teachers read HP books to them.
     
  8. Angel_Voice

    Angel_Voice Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2006
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    I know there has been a lot of controversy about these books. In the beginning, I took other Christians opinions, that have been in the media, to heart and wouldn't allow my kids to read the books or watch the movies. My oldest son had a therapist at the time that encouraged me to let him read and watch. I'm glad that I did! The movies are terrific! I bought the entire series of books for my hubby and he LOVED them!!

    If you'll remember a few years back there was a lot of controversy about the "Little Mermaid" movie. Saying that the witch Ursula was teaching children to disobey their parents. There has also been a lot of uproar over Pokemon and Yugio in the past.

    My hubby and I raise our kids in a Christian home and they attend the Christian private school that I teach at. I believe if you teach your children well, they will grow-up well. I don't think you should try to contain their imagination. I don't think by letting them watch the Harry Potter movies or letting them read the books will give them a desire to learn "magic" or be "evil"! However, Harry Potter, Pokemon, Yugio and Power Rangers are not allowed at movie time at our school. (This is per our director!)

    I do agree, however, that perhaps you should send a note home just to be on the safe side. You may want to even ask your principal just in case something has already been said.
     
  9. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2004
    Messages:
    815
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 5, 2006

    I wouldn't read those books out loud in my classroom becuase I have students who are not allowed to read the books based on religious preferences or beliefs...I use to read the Witches to my class, but was adviced against it because of the content (magic, witches, etc)...
     
  10. hanvan

    hanvan Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,776
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 6, 2006

    I had a friend who once said she never understood why people would ban a movie like Harry Potter (magic, witches etc...) but call the wizard of Oz a "classic". There aren't many people who would tell you that their child can't watch Oz so whats the difference with Potter. Just a thought!
     
  11. wig

    wig Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,036
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 6, 2006

    1. I suspect that most fifth graders allowed to read Harry Potter Books have already read at least the first book. Many of my sixth graders have read all of them

    2. It is a very long book. For the amount of time you would take to read it to them, you could read several books to the class exposing them to a greater variety of authors and genres.

    3. If you have students who do not like fantasy (and there are some out there), they would be "stuck" with listening to this book for a long time.

    4. I teach in a Christian school and read the book. I did not find it it particularily wonderful, but did not find anything any more objectionable than any other book with magic. However, many parents do, so if you choose to read the book, I would send a letter home.
     
  12. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 6, 2006

    To be perfectly honest, I would not give my child permission for religious reasons. That's just me. I would not object to other kids reading it. It's their parents choice, but I would be upset if the teacher did not send a permission slip out for it. I would like to add, that if it were for an older class, I would consider it, but being that it's this young, I would say no.
     
  13. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 6, 2006

    I have a parent in my county trying to get it banned from the library in all of the county's schools. I would definately ask for permission from parents.
     
  14. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 6, 2006

    I probably wouldn't read it to my class, not because of parent problems, just because the book is so long. I tend to read shorter books to my class. I only get 15 or so minutes a day and it would take forever to read Harry Potter in that time.
     
  15. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,321
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jul 6, 2006

    May we then assume that a family that forbids HP on the grounds of witchcraft, etc, would also forbid almost all Disney animated films, The Wizard of Oz, Mary Poppins, Nanny McFee, Cars, ET, Ella Enchanted, and everything else that deals with magic, wishes, etc? Because if the family isn't consistent, the family is still, by their own standards, h e l l bound, aren't they? Naughty, naughty Dorothy and Toto! Evil, evil, any child who watches them!

    I adore HP. There is nothing whatsoever evil in any of them, except that which is overcome by good. I do not take as viable defense the testimony or opinion of someone who has not, himself/herself, PERSONALLY read the book involved. Excerpts, articles, and other peoples' statements do not count in any way.
     
  16. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 6, 2006

    Jane,

    Unfortunately you cannot assume this. I had one parent not allow her child to go the pumpkin patch b/c pumpkins represent halloween (but yet she wanted us to save him the halloween party treats) and he was unable to use his "magic finger" to spell words in the air b/c it represented magic. I decided to do a home visit when she decided to take him out of kindergarten (kg. was not manditory) and yes, her child must have had over 50 Disney movies including Cinderella, Snow White...
     
  17. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 6, 2006

    Jane, can we not give our own opinion without getting slammed, judged, or what? So now I feel I need to defend my choice for not letting my child watch the movie at a young age for religious reasons? I never said my child would be hellbound, nor do I think that, I just wont allow it until a later age than this. I personally saw the first movie and liked it. I would not, however, let my child see it or read the book until he is older. Just my opinion and choice, which I am entitled to.:)
     
  18. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 6, 2006

    Many people who I have talked to who do not allow this movie, or any other HP movie, do not allow it because it depicts the witches as good, instead of the "bad ones". Saying "it's ok to use witch craft". Not saying this is my stance, but this is the basis of many people who do not allow it.
     
  19. KWLme

    KWLme Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2006
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 6, 2006

    My first year teaching 3rd grade was the year the first HP book came out. I read it to my class and had an experience I'll never forget. It was the last day of school, and we still 28 pages to finish the book. I teach at a private school, and we had Chapel from
    9:00-10:15. It was 10:20 when we got back to the class, and school ended at 10:30. I immediately began reading HP. At 10:30, I told the class that they could leave now - no one moved.
    At 10:40 I opened the door and told the parents that the kids wanted to stay while I finished reading the book. I read until 11:10 on the last day of school. Twenty-five of my 26 students did not budge. (The other student went protesting - but his family had a plane to catch at 1:00.) I've never had an experience like this before or since. Granted, it might be different now that the movies have come out and most of the kids already know what is going to happen, but still.... Anyway, good luck! Remind the kids that the first chapter is the least exciting, and if they can hang in through that one, the rest of the book will be great! As far as parental objections, I suppose it depends on your community. I have heard of some people objecting to HP for religious reasons..... As a side note, my husband, my 2 kids (16 & 12), and myself, just finished listening to "Half Blood Prince" on tape. We usually take turns reading a book to each other, but this one seemed a bit overwhelming. It was a nice break from TV.
     
  20. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 6, 2006

    I think the 1st book is pretty safe. I wouldn't personally read the book to a class (if I taught older grades).

    There is, however, nothing wrong with putting it in your library. Actually by law parents do not have to know what their children are reading. I know this will cause some talk, but that is actually the law. Students have rights that should not be violated. We had a librarian who insisted that we (as teachers) not know what the children were reading. Now I personally have a problem with this. Yes parents should be aware of what their children are reading. Hello! Come on.

    Anyway, there is nothing wrong with encouraging kids to explore your library. I'm constantly reading a children's book, and during Reading Workshop I share about what I'm reading at the time. I like to promote membership to the local library too. I pull out the book and tell them what the book is about and what I think will happen, or what it makes me think about. The students really get into it and look for the books.
     
  21. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 6, 2006


    That's similar to my opinion. I don't really know. I haven't even read the books to judge.
     
  22. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 6, 2006

    If you think about it, though, just about any book could be a problem for parents. I read My Palace of Leaves to the kids. It's about war and talks about being being shot and killed. Because of Winn Dixie talks about the mom being an alcoholic. Don't get me wrong, any one, any parent, has a right to their own opinion on a book (although I really feel they should read it before they decide). My point is, if I have to wait for signed permission slips before reading a book to my class, I'd never be able to read anything. I teach 5th. By then the kids know if their parents don't want them to read a certain book. If a problem arose, they would be off to the side reading to themselves while I read to the rest of the class.
     
  23. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,321
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jul 6, 2006

    I was being sarcastic up there, by the way. HP was never meant for small children, it was meant for older kids. I personally believe it has done more for literacy than any system or state mandated curriculum has ever done. With my own eyes I have seen countless little kids trying like they've never tried anything before to read these big fat (but not nearly fat enough!) books, because they are so interested in the characters and plotlines, and because all the other kids are reading them. Incentive? I'll say. And far more interesting than the standard "I will go. Will you go?" mush that passes for 'reading' in many schools.

    I honestly believe, however, that families who forbid one book for a particular reason should not allow anything else with that same sort of theme, in the name of consistency. Disney is full of witches, some good and some evil. So is Oz. Forbid one, it only makes sense to forbid all the others, wouldn't it? Then again, Disney and Oz don't have the PR, do they. . . . .

    I also do not count the testimony of anybody or any organization who hasn't even read the thing; how can you have an opinion about something based solely on somebody else's opinion, and they probably haven't read it either?

    Yes, we all have a right to our opinions, and really, we don't have to defend them to anybody. You don't, and I don't. But wouldn't it be nice if we could?

    My own kids were required to read boring pap down in grade school, this while they were reading middle and high school level at home. A family/school/teacher that won't allow a child to read what he wants to read, barring Playboy, at school, is suspect to me. I simply do not understand it. Isn't one of the goals of education to have our children know far more than we know?

    Is it the elementary vs. secondary thing again? Am I honestly a b i t ch? Is somebody a fuddy-duddy?

    Do I even belong on this forum, or should I take my opinions and leave, and quit bothering other people's?
     
  24. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    No, Jane, definitely don't take your opinions and leave! I agree about being cosistent with everything. I don't have kids- yet. However; just because it's Disney doesn't mean I agree with it. I would be selective.

    Another thing that popped in my head. Would it be unfair of me as a parent to NOT expose my child to certain things?. Maybe. I would hope that the values and beliefs I've taught my child would influence them more than a book or movie.

    As you can tell, I am torn and need to read up on HP books.
     
  25. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2005
    Messages:
    14,067
    Likes Received:
    1,884

    Jul 7, 2006


    You've expressed what I've been feeling while reading this thread. I know personally of parents who would have difficulties with Harry Potter, so I have stayed away from it (that's the chicken in me...avoiding conflict with certain parents because they have already given me enough grief). However, I have read some pretty "heavy" material to my grade 5 students this year (dealing with such subjects as the Holocaust and 9/11) without thinking twice about asking for or needing permission. I choose books with a purpose in mind and am able to explain that purpose should I need to. As always in my room, if students are uncomfortable with any subject matter being presented in my room, they are able to choose an alternate activity (after discussion and approval by me).

    No Jane...don't go. I always look forward to reading your posts; you often say what I wish I could!
     
  26. MissV

    MissV Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    165
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    Meh, 5th graders are more than old enough for Harry Potter.
    Plus, the first book in the series doesn't average many more pages than any other chapter book.

    I discussed the same issue with my boyfriend (also a teacher...12 years more experience), and he said that rule of thumb was that if it was in the school Library then it was more than appropriate to read in the classroom as a read-a-loud. So, unless your school has had problems with it in the past, I would suggest going ahead and reading it.

    If you sent permission slips home, it would be like a red flag to parents, "Hey! I'm not sure if this book is appropriate.." Parents that ordinarily wouldn't think twice about it, suddenly go "Oh! I've heard about those devil books!" etc etc. (or that's the way it is around here...most parents that object to things haven't even read it themselves)

    It's a fantasy book, pure and simple... and not a very long one at that. I'm not sure how you can expose children to different types of literary genres without including fantasy:p What you COULD do, is send home a big list of books that you plan on reading this year and include the genre beside each one. Include Harry Potter in the list.

    I would say use "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe" in an alternate assignment (thinking about more Christian fashioned books), but it DOES have a Witch in it. You just can't win.
     
  27. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    Jane,

    Please do NOT leave....I always love reading your well-thought-out, highly reasoned, and sensible responses....laced as they are with just the right dab of humor and/or sarcasm. It's the spices and seasonings that make the meal even more delicious, right?
     
  28. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006


    Oh Doc, C'mon, we know the real reason is the marriage propposal:p

    Just Kidding, Jane we love you!!!:D
     
  29. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    Frizz, Now I'm blushing! :eek:

    Jane, see what you've gotten me into here?? (I LOVE it!) LOLOLOL
     
  30. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,321
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jul 7, 2006

    Thank you. I appreciate those kind words very much. I will try to be a little more bland, though. I won't succeed, because it's not in me to sit back and be quiet when something bothers me a lot, but I will try.

    Narnia. . . . . we had more parents gripe about the Christian theme than about the White Witch, one year.

    Really, you can't win. There is always somebody whose preacher's neighbor's sister's daughter's mailman's busboy's TA "heard" from "somebody important" that a book was "evil" therefore, the whole uninformed kit and kaboodle of them want it banned. None of them will read it, but they'll protest it anyway.

    I will NEVER understand that mentality. And I guess some of you will never understand mine.

    I loved it when my kids came home with questions Tim and I didn't know the answers to. It told me that the generation after me was striving for things my generation didn't quite get to. I always believed that any honest question was a good question. God gave us brains that we might use them to learn new things, not just to store other people's information in. He gave us hearts that we might love and help, not to be suspicious of new things and to view everything our parents didn't know with instant antipathy. This business of being suspicious of new things is beyond my comprehension. I'm sorry. That is, I'm sorry for anyone who views new things with suspicion, instead of anticipation. The value system in my home is such that new information was greeted, not labelled before it was even researched.

    There have actually been books and films I would not recommend to anyone, but I read or saw them myself before forming an opinion.

    Sorry, I did it again, didn't I. Sigh.
     
  31. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    Jane, I like your way of thinking. :D
     
  32. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    And you should KEEP doing it, Jane.......how boring would discussions be without a variety of viewpoints? Too many people take things WAY to personally sometimes.

    We have to remember....we're (that's the universal "we're," nitpickers) NOT always right...and everything we like ISN'T necessarily high-quality or correct. People LIKE McDonald's, but most of us realize that it's not really "GOOD" food. Unfortunately, when it comes to personal taste and opinions, people aren't usually able to be quite that objective. I find it amazing that kids think that because they don't LIKE a certain kind of music that it "sucks," or that their favorite "band du jour" might not be the next Beethoven.
     
  33. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    3,321
    Likes Received:
    12

    Jul 7, 2006

    I know. Most things are a matter of perspective and context. You know what "they" say:

    "A man who shoots his mother-in-law right between the eyes is a good marksman, but he is not necessarily a good man."
     
  34. wig

    wig Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,036
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 7, 2006

    .
     
  35. hanvan

    hanvan Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,776
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    I think this whole thing has started to get out of hand. The point of the forum is to express thoughts and opinions without judging others :)

    I agree with Jane, I think if you are going to take out one "witch" book then take 'em all out. I do realize HP has a little more violence in it vs others books (such as OZ...but the witch does die!) Anyway, I think its all about the approach to the literature. If you teach a child that pumpkins for example are bad and "EVIL" then they will believe it. But if you teach them that its a harvest product ...well you get my point. I would probably reserve this book for older children (grades 4/5-up)
     
  36. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    Messages:
    6,439
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    Right, books don't teach children... Teachers and parents do. Books can influence kids to some extent, but ultimately what they have been taught will prevail if reinforced at home. I can respect everyone's opinion on this. I actually find it interesting. I would respect a parents right not to let their child read the books just as anyone else on here would. I have to get reading to see what all the controversy is about.

    I have a friend,,, a best friend who is born again Christian and won't allow her children to read the books or watch the movies. On the otherhand, he can play violent video games...?????? Make sense? To me, not really. I respect her wishes though. I returned the HP movies.
     
  37. wig

    wig Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,036
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 7, 2006

    But again, as stated in a previous post it goes beyond witches - crystal ball reading, numerology, palmistry, astrology, divination, curses and charms. And that is a big part of the objection for many people.

    I have "Ella Enchanted" "The Wizard of Oz, a historical fiction book on the Salem Witch Trials, yet I do feel I am being consistent with what I allow in my classroom library. I also have the first HP in my library. I think the definition of consistency is the problem. I have a bigger problem with the graphicness is the latter novels. However, I am consistent with that in my classroom library, too - but perhaps that could be disputed, too.). So again, even consistency can be defined in different ways.

    However, I am constantly amazed at the number of parents that allow violent video games in their home but do not allow their children to read books with even less violence. However, that is another discussion.

    Going back to the original OP's question, I think a shorter book would be better to read than a long book - especially one that is controversial.:)
     
  38. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,492
    Likes Received:
    100

    Jul 7, 2006

    Oh dear. Looks like I have opened the proverbial can of worms. I really wasn't trying to start a fight. I teach at a parochial school. I have the backing of the Vatican (let's not go there) on these books that they are simply stories, so I could pull that out if a parent started asking questions. Personally I think HP teaches a lot of wonderful lessons: honesty, true friendship (what it is and isn't), loyalty, how to deal well with bullies, respectful behavior towards peers and elders regardless of whether or not you like them, and acceptence. JK Rowling has a very strong theme that shows prejudiced individuals (against non-pure witches and wixards) as the bad guys. She is very much against any sort of prejudice. I think these are VERY important lessons for kids to see in action. Unfortunately they don't see it nearly enough in the real world and almost never in the mass media.
     
  39. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 7, 2006

    You're question was a valid one. The discussion has stretched some. I don't think anyone is going to change anyone else's mind on Harry. I think it boils down to you. You know your kids and know your parents. If you think they would be ok, then go for it. As someone above said, I think sending home a note about that one book is saying that you think there is a problem with the book.
     
  40. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,492
    Likes Received:
    100

    Jul 8, 2006

    I'm really not sure what I'll do. If I leave this on the shelf it will be because most kids will have been exposed to it already. I'm not really afraid of incurring parental wrath. It's happened before, and I've survived. I just want to expose them to the idea that the literature is soooo much better than the movies and the strong, positive character traits of the Harry and his friends. I would only read the first and maybe the second if they begged me, but never the others. They are too long and the series does get scarier as it progresses. Just whet their appetites you know and let them continue on their own if they want.
     
  41. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 8, 2006

    Always leave 'em wanting more! :) I have the AR tests for all of the series, but I only have the first 2 books on my shelf. I simply don't want them trying to read it at school because it would take too long. I encourage them to check them out from our parish library if they don't have them already because they are worth a boocoodle of points (and watching the movie WON'T pass you on the test.)
    I try to vary the read-alouds that I have to expose the kids to a variety of literature so that they can see how many different types of books there are and hopefully find their niche.
    It's true, there is a thread of loyalty and friendship that runs throughout the whole HP series. Look at Dumbledore and Hagrid, and the others, staying so loyal to Harry for 11 years while he was growing up. It really is the story of young kids growing up. Take out the witches (although if it were my story, my older sister would fit that bill! :D) and magic and it's pretty much any coming of age story.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. txmomteacher2
Total: 217 (members: 2, guests: 201, robots: 14)
test