Read Alouds

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by MissScrimmage, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I'm looking for a great (chapter book) read aloud for grade 1. We've read a few Magic Treehouse books that relate to our science topics and my students have really enjoyed that. We are in a bit of a plateau in terms of 'themes' so I'd like just a general read aloud that we can enjoy for reading sake. What 'chapter books' do your grade 1s enjoy listening to?
     
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  3. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    When I was a kid, I liked Pippi Longstocking, the Ramona series, and Sideways Stories from Wayside School. Oh! Such good memories of those all. :D
     
  4. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    THIS. So darn funny!

    Mrs. Gorf was terrifying!
     
  5. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    How about Goosebumps?
     
  6. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Charlotte's Web, Ramona or Ralph S. Mouse series by Cleary, Humphrey series (Birney?).

    Sorry, but I disagree with Goosebumps for this age.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    :thumb:

    I wouldn't read Goosebumps aloud to any grade level...there's so many better books out there.
     
  8. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Winnie the Pooh and House at Pooh Corner are perfect for this age. Calm and friendly and comforting, and the characters are familiar to most kids. I don't think most kids today get exposed to literary classics enough.
     
  9. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Not everyone is a fan but Junie B. Jones is good for that age group if you're looking for a series. Flat Stanley is really popular too, and they have the World Wide Adventure series now, last year I read the on in Australia to my class when we studied Australia, they loved it.
     
  10. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Do they have Japan?? That's what we are doing this month.
     
  11. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Great suggestions. I do 'The Mouse and the Motorcycle' every June. It's a fun one for the end of the year. I wouldn't read Goosebumps as a read aloud.
     
  12. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Just googled it - there is one for Japan. Thanks for the suggestion! I think we'll do this next.
     
  13. otterpop

    otterpop Phenom

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    :thumb: More great choices.

    I also disagree about Goosebumps for a read aloud choice. They scared me as a kid. Some kids loved them, though, and they would be a nice addition to a classroom library.
     
  14. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Junie B. Jones
    Judy Moody books
    Stink (by same author as Judy Moody)

    I also agree with The Mouse and the Motorcycle
     
  15. teach1abc

    teach1abc Rookie

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    When I taught first, I read Arthur's Mystery Envelope, Candy Corn Contest, later in the year - James and the Giant Peach (with some editing of language), my son liked The Chocolate Touch around first grade, Junie B Jones, Flat Stanley - those are some off the top of my head.
     
  16. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    I was thinking about the Frog and Toad, Junie B. Jones, and I loved the idea of Charlotte's Web.
     
  17. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    The Mercy Watson series by Kate DiCamillo is my FAVORITE read aloud series for first grade. There are only 6 books, but they are so funny with great full-color illustrations. My kids ADORE them. There is a waiting list to check them out of my library now that I have read them all to the class. I love them as transitional books for my kiddos switching to chapter books, because they have very short chapters and lots of pictures still. Plus, they are just so funny and sweet. I'm sad we're done reading the series. I have moved on to Magic Tree House (I've got lots of boys who are super into those), but I might try some of these other suggestions next!

    I actually wasn't allowed to read Goosebumps as a kid - I wouldn't want to read those out loud. Some kids might be too scared, especially in first grade. Also, they're kind of "junk food" books.
     
  18. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    yd, my students love Mercy Watson.
     
  19. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    My Kindergarteners LOVE Goosebumps, but I understand your reasoning :)
     
  20. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Definitely wouldn't read Goosebumps to my kindergartners.
     
  21. i8myhomework

    i8myhomework Comrade

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    Too bad! My kids love them. I do all the voices and they get a kick out of it.

    Welcome to Camp Nightmare is a long time favorite, but I always pick a new one to read.

    I'd love to read a Choose your own adventure edition with them, and I just might before the end is up. That might be more fun with older grades.

    They love Wayside Stories, and any type of fairy tale. I'm looking for more options but none of them like Junie B Jones, lol. I got all of my students spoiled on horror that now all they want to read is spooky stuff! My P blames me :blush: lol
     
  22. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    I guess I'm old school, :lol:
     
  23. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    I try to read a variety of books to my class, but would not include horror types. If they upset even one or two kids (many of whom see enough horror in their everyday life), it is just not worth it to me when there are so many well-written books available. I don't just pick sugar-coated books, but they need to have some meaning.

    We are now reading Phyllis Renolds Naylor's "Cat Pack" series and they love it! The first in the series is The Grand Escape.
     
  24. Rebecca1122

    Rebecca1122 Comrade

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    I am reading a Boxcar Children book to my kids now and they are super into it! It's called Surprise Island.
     
  25. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    At one time read-alouds were considered to be indispensable to developing vocabulary and language in our inner city school. Over the last few years they weren't even allowed because they didn't fit into the curriculum - and this was in 2nd grade!:confused::eek:hmy::dizzy::(
     
  26. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    Cannot believe read-alouds were banned!! Crazy.

    I teach second grade. Before winter break, I read Bailey Kids Mrs Jeepers Christmas (?) and am now reading Calendar mysteries February Fun. Kids BEG me to read more than one chapter...I love how excited they get! I find that it is a great time to work on vocabulary, idioms, figurative language, informal vs. formal speech, etc...
    In the spring, I will read Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Charlotte's Web.
     
  27. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Read alouds ARE addressed in the CCSS:

    Language Arts/K – Speaking and Listening: Confirm understanding of a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media by asking and answering questions about key details and requesting clarification if something is not understood. Sample read aloud texts are specifically recommended through third grade in the standards.
    HINT FROM Common Core Standards FOR SELECTING READ ALOUDS:
    texts need to be selected around topics or themes that generate knowledge and allow students to study those topics or themes in depth.
    “Children in the early grades (particularly K–2) should participate in rich, structured conversations with an adult in response to the written texts that are read aloud, orally comparing and contrasting as well as analyzing and synthesizing, in the manner called for by the Standards.”
     
  28. Pashtun

    Pashtun Fanatic

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    How much time typically do you dedicate to read alouds? Especially in regards to “Children in the early grades (particularly K–2) should participate in rich, structured conversations with an adult in response to the written texts that are read aloud, orally comparing and contrasting as well as analyzing and synthesizing, in the manner called for by the Standards.”
     
  29. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I try to read 1 chapter every day after lunch. After I read a chapter we make predictions about what might happen next and try to use the next chapter's title as a clue. I don't do much else with my chapter book read alouds - I want the kids to just ENJOY the story. With "The Mouse and the Motorcycle" we always watch the movie after and then compare the book and the movie.
     
  30. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    It's been over a year since I quit, so MAYBE they've changed their policy (again) I certainly hope so....
     
  31. OhThePlaces

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    I teach 3rd grade, but we spend about 15-20 minutes on our read-aloud each day. We spend time discussing unfamiliar vocabulary, figurative language, making connections and predictions, etc... Thankfully, it's a part of my district's curriculum. Each student has their own copy of the book and they read along in their heads as I read it out loud.

    This year we've read Charlotte's Web, The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, and we're currently reading Because of Winn Dixie.

    Edward Tulane was a huge hit (and my personal favorite) but it's probably a bit mature for 1st. :)
     
  32. ktdclark

    ktdclark Comrade

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    We also do a chapter a day, more if they have a good persuasive argument to encourage me to read more....

    We spend about 15 minutes, including discussion and "teachable moments".
     
  33. teacherman1

    teacherman1 Devotee

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    Just by coincidence Charlotte's Web was the book I chose to do read-alouds with and, like you, I tried to do a chapter a day.

    I also went so far as to purchase a dozen books with my own money and suggest (in a letter home) that those students who wanted to read along in class could re-purchase the book from me with my B&N teacher discount. Many parents sent the money in, so those kids would use the books in class and take them home at night.

    Unfortunately, the principal and reading coach mentioned that this was not part of "the curriculum" and strongly encouraged me to cease and desist.

    Here's one of the 2nd grade PI kids I was tutoring after school reading Charlotte's Web. http://www.dropshots.com/teacherman9000#date/2012-10-23/08:24:01 You can see he has his backpack on.....

    If I'm not mistaken, Charlotte's Web is a RL4.5.
     
  34. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    My second graders loved Edward Tulane back in the fall!
     
  35. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    That is so sad. :( Administration is actually suppressing love of reading.
     
  36. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    A Ninja one for Japan right? I have it- haven't read it but it's popular in my classroom- especially with the boys.
     
  37. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Yes, it's all about Ninjas. We had to have a little talk yesterday about how karate might look easy and we might think we can do it, but unless we've been trained we are not actually allowed to do any karate moves. :D
     

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