Read-Alouds

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MrsC, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 27, 2010

    I just finished the first day of my 3-day workshop on read-alouds--look out Chapters, here I come! Some of what we talked about today has me wondering a few things:

    1. What do you read aloud to your students? (Not specific titles, more the type of material you read)
    2. How often do you read aloud in your classroom?
    3. Why do you read aloud?
     
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  3. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Jul 27, 2010

    1. I read mostly chapter books, with a few picture books throughout the year. I try to choose high-quality literature, and I mix books that are at my students' reading levels with some that are harder.

    2. I read to my students everyday after lunch/recess, usually for 10-15 minutes.

    3. One of my main goals in reading aloud is to get kids excited about books. I choose genres, series, and authors that I think will 'hook' my kids into expanding the kinds of books they read. I also think it is a great way to build community; the shared experience of listening to and thinking about a story is a great way to start conversations and discussions. Finally, it gives me another opportunity to model comprehension strategies. I can make connections to the book in other parts of the school day, and that is a common element that all the students can relate to.
     
  4. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Jul 27, 2010

    I read them a story from children's literature to go along with our reading lesson every day. We also have an on-going chapter book that's several grade levels above their level-to work on listening comprehension and vocabulary.I read to them in morning as they come in (we started breakfast in the classroom, so they can listen and eat), for our reading lesson and then before lunch.

    I also do it to model what good reading sounds like.
     
  5. historynut

    historynut Rookie

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    Jul 27, 2010

    1. Chapter books. Usually stuff that is a bit above their independent level. (Leveled 6th grade class)

    2. Either the first 10-15 mins of reading or where I could fit it.

    3. I like to choose books that they wouldn't readily go for. Some of my old favorites sometimes. I want them to get exposed to different authors than they usually go for. We also pull extra vocabulary from the books to talk about. I also model our skills and strategies while reading.
     
  6. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Jul 27, 2010

    I love the read-aloud. I get to model fluency, and I can also model strategies that are important. Often I'll get distracted by something a student is doing (or something in my own head). I'll stop and tell the class that I don't understand what I just read... and that I need to backup and reread. Or I can stop and say "Hey... what Johnny did in this book reminds me of the LAST book we read when Jimmy did THIS" (Making connections).

    I do it every day (usually multiple times) Sometimes I just do it for enjoyment (often during snack, I'll do a read-aloud.

    I'll use picture books or early chapter books with my first/second graders.

    On another note... This may be of interest to some:

    http://globalreadaloud.blogspot.com/2010/07/global-read-aloud-project.html

    The Global Read Aloud project for 2010. This year they're using "The Little Prince".
     
  7. hawkteacher

    hawkteacher Comrade

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    Jul 27, 2010

    halfateacher, thanks for the link to the global read aloud project! It's such a great idea!
     
  8. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    Jul 27, 2010

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  9. Love to Teach

    Love to Teach Cohort

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    Jul 27, 2010

    1. chapter books that compliment our reading theme for the month, biographies of people of courage and character, and because we study American History in 5th grade, historical fiction and nonfiction books

    2. 15-20 minutes per day

    3. to model fluency, nuture a love for the written word, inspire my students to be people of character, and to reinforce both a knowledge and a love of history...oh, and because I love sharing books I love with them! :)
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jul 27, 2010

    Great idea!
     
  11. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 28, 2010

    Thanks for that link, halfateacher--I'm going to share it at my workshop today. I'm going to post some ideas on this topic after my session today.
     
  12. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Jul 28, 2010

    I do read alouds weekly (I only have my kids for 30/day). I use them to model reading strategies.
    I only do picture books (k-2 ESL).
     
  13. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jul 28, 2010

    Here are my answers:

    1. What do you read aloud to your students? (Not specific titles, more the type of material you read): novels, short stories, picture books, newspaper and magazine articles, excerpts from non-fiction texts, information from webpages, jokes, samples of student work from previous years.

    2. How often do you read aloud in your classroom? Every day

    3. Why do you read aloud? To share information, to expose students to a variety of texts and genres, to prompt discussion, for pleasure, to provide a springboard for writing activities, to model reading strategies, to model the reading process, to provide background knowledge, to discuss writing techniques and text features, to make sophisticated and challenging texts more accessible, to (hopefully) spark an interest in reading.

    The primary focus of the workshop I'm attending has been on picture books--using rich texts and a variety of activities to reinforce the use of reading strategies. We spent a good portion of the day today developing a multi-day plan using one picture book; tomorrow we will do the same with another book. I'm really looking forward to diving into this even more deeply and being even more purposeful with the texts I use with my students.
     

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