read alouds same every year?

Discussion in 'Fourth Grade' started by Mrs_B, Jul 5, 2008.

  1. Mrs_B

    Mrs_B Comrade

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    Jul 5, 2008

    Do you read the same read alouds every year? I am leaning towards mixing it up for my own interest but then I feel a little bad that they might miss out on some that I know they would like. Last year I read:
    -Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing
    -Frindle
    -The Hundred Dresses
    -Bunnicula
    -The Family Under the Bridge
    -Walk Two Moons
    -The City Of Ember
    -The People of Sparks

    There are SO many good books it is hard to choose!!!
     
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  3. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Jul 6, 2008

    I have some standards that I always read, and then I mix it up with a few different ones thrown in every year. My standards that are the same from year to year include:
    Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing
    Titanic Crossing (fiction set on the Titanic)
    Love, Ruby Lavender
    Frindle

    I can't remember off the top of my head if there are any others that I always include or not.
     
  4. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jul 6, 2008

    I use some the same and some new. At the end of each year I have my class list their top 3 favorites out of all the books I read aloud, and then we tally those and it helps me pick for the upcoming year.

    Last year I threw in a new book which the kids didn't seem to enjoy all that much as we went along, but surprisingly it came out #2 in the voting.

    For the past six years the hands-down #1 pick, by a huge majority, is a series by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor - the first book in the series is The Grand Escape. It is about a group of cats.
     
  5. GoldenPoppy

    GoldenPoppy Habitué

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    Jul 6, 2008

    My core group is the same each year:
    Junket
    Jeremy and the Wappo
    The Egypt Game
    In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson
    Jeremy and the General
    Lovina's Song
    Dragon of the Lost Sea
     
  6. smannes

    smannes Companion

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    Jul 8, 2008

    We changed ours this year. This year we're reading:

    Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
    Sign of the Beaver
    From the Mixed Up Files of Basil E. Frankweiler
    Dear Mr. Henshaw
    Cheaper By the Dozen
    Trumpet of the Swan
    Whales on Stilts
    Misty of Chincoteague

    We tried to incorporate many different genres and also books that in some way or another will go along with our curriculum.
     
  7. sunfishy

    sunfishy Rookie

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    Jul 23, 2008

    Diary of a Wimpy Kid and The Lightning Thief were very popular in the 4th grade classroom I worked in as an aid this year. The teacher decided to incorporate them as guiding reading books because it made the kids excited about reading.
     
  8. allyd

    allyd Rookie

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    Aug 2, 2008

    Ones my kids loved:
    The Indian in the Cupboard
    The Journey of Edward Tulane
    The Liberation of Gabriel King
    The Cay
     
  9. zoodies

    zoodies Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2008

    Our school participates in the Mark Twain Award book for the state of MO, so we focus on the nominees. Great way to introduce new authors and series to the students. We also start w/ Tales...they love Blume. We used to read Where the Red Fern Grows and do many actities w/ this.
     
  10. Becky123abc

    Becky123abc Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    For those of you reading the chapter books...are these books you are reading outloud to your class? If so, does each student have a copy and follow along silently? Or do they just listen to you read the only copy?

    I've seen a few class sets of books on sale at ebay but not too many. Do you ask the parents to buy particular books?

    I wasn't sure how all that works.
    Thanks,
    Becky
     
  11. Mrs_B

    Mrs_B Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2008

    I read it aloud while they listen. We stop every once in awhile to make a prediction, comment on a text-to-text connection, notice a simile, define vocabulary, etc.
     
  12. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Aug 5, 2008

    Same with me. Those are all excellent books mentioned above. I love Because of Winn Dixie, Number the Stars, Lily's Crossing, and Maniac Magee.

    I change most of the books every year, though some are keepers. The problem is that I start reading a new one and then I really don't like it - but I can't tell the kids that unless I know that none of them like it either. I didn't like The Phantom Tollbooth, Family Under the Bridge, Egypt Game. In re Family Under.... - my kids didn't know what gypsies were!! Strange.

    This year I will read more historical fiction.
     
  13. lysithea88

    lysithea88 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    We have a core group of books that we read every year, depending on the grade-level theme for that year (we go back and forth...one year is Westward Expansion, genealogy, South Bass Island topics, the other year includes Future, Dr. Seuss, Middle Ages, and Ancient Cultures topics). I also like to add at least one book that coincides with the school's global education theme-of-the-year. It's China this year, so I'm going to read Red Scarf Girl.
     
  14. sunfishy

    sunfishy Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2008

    We do not read chapter books as a class, only picture books like Diary of a Fly. We have guided reading groups that we read different chapter books with according to their reading levels.
     
  15. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Aug 5, 2008

    Yes... and no. I alternate a little bit, and sometimes I get exhausted with reading a book three or four years in a row. This year, I'll be reading No Talking by Andrew Clements :), yet I'll also stay with The Boy Who Ran for President and The Indian in the Cupboard like the last few years. The rest are to be determined. I may try The City of Ember because the movie will be coming out.
     
  16. Mrs_B

    Mrs_B Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2008

    My kids LOVED City of Ember this year. I read Frindle but was thinking of switching to No Talking for a slight change. I am also going to read The Boy Who Ran For President. I can't decide what my first book should be. I read Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing and they liked it but honestly, I didn't enjoy it as much as I remembered... I bought The Lightening Thief today since I've heard so much about it.
     
  17. Jamey123

    Jamey123 Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2008

    I always begin the year with Fourth Grade Rats by Jerry Spinelli. The kids love it and one character wants to be a third grade angel instead of a fourth grade rat..very cute!! Some others that the kids enjoy are:

    The BFG-Ronald Dahl (has a movie too)
    The Tale of Despereaux: Being the Story of a Mouse, a Princess, Some Soup, and a Spool of Thread is a fantasy book by Kate DiCamillo-won the Newbery Medal in 2004.
    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory-Dahl
    The Sideways Stories From Wayside School series is a popular series of children's books by Louis Sachar-think there are 3 books to read (you can add your students names in the book to change the characters and they love it!!!)
    Holes-Sachar
     
  18. Nessy

    Nessy Rookie

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    Aug 17, 2008

    I also keep about 4 that were hits each year, and change up other ones that students didn't love or that I got bored with. I also always rotate genres so I can pull out different literary elements to talk about with the kids. I usually start with fantasy or realistic fiction. But the kids read so much of that on their own, that I like adding lots of historical fiction or non-fiction. It leads to so much discussion.

    My students loved the City of Ember last year and that movie is coming out in theaters this September. It will be the first book I read to my students and then it will be an optional after school field trip with parents when it comes out. (We did that with Prince Caspian this year and 20 of my 25 students showed up with their families. It was a hit.)
     
  19. desertlilac

    desertlilac Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2008

    I have a question, too. I'm new to 4th grade, and thus their books. Are these books that you all have listed for read-aloud books that are above their grade level or at their grade level?
    Do or may 4th graders read books below their grade level in such settings as independent reading in the reading corner, or is it ok to read such books to them as a group because of theme and use it as a springboard for discussion?
     
  20. lysithea88

    lysithea88 Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2008

    reading grade levels

    I was taught in my teacher education program that read-alouds should be above the individual's reading level. Each student basically has three different levels to consider...their independent level, their instructional level, and their frustration level. Any silent reading should be done at the independent level, but any read-alouds, shared reading, or guided reading should be at their instructional levels. Frustration levels you want to avoid. There are assessment programs out there that can help you find these different levels for each of your students. I have used Burns/Roe informal reading inventory in the past.

    That being said, I have also seen teaches who read-aloud books that are at or below their kids' reading levels in order to fit in with a theme. I'd say there are pros and cons to this. It is good to teacher via interdisciplinary units to help make connections for the kids, but it's probably not encouraging them to stretch their reading abilities to the next level.

    Hope this helps!
     

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